Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Business

We mean business
Contact us today to get results

Young too lazy? Or employers too crap?

johnboy 27 June 2010 88

The Canberra Times is running an epic whinge by Domino’s Belconnen Manager David Hutchinson:

Manager David Hutchinson said the store needed at least two extra staff members a month just to keep up with demand.

”Maybe four or five years ago there were a lot of kids who seemed to want a job, but there’s not as many as there used to be,” Mr Hutchinson.

”Kids are a bit lazier these days. They will just go and watch TV or go and play the Xbox instead going to work.

”You do get a lot of kids, too, who get a fair bit of coin off the parents.”

McDonalds are also saying “it has always struggled to fill jobs at its 15 Canberra restaurants.”

Now thats odd. Some of us distinctly remember queues around the corner for maccas jobs when youth unemployment in the ACT was over 50% (thank you Paul Keating).

Now here’s a thought. Rather than employers thinking the youth of Canberra are an indentured labour force, required to slave away in their kitchens to deliver up the funds to open up another franchise, maybe they need to offer pay and conditions that make the positions attractive?

Crazy talk I know.


What's Your Opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
88 Responses to Young too lazy? Or employers too crap?
Filter
Order
« Previous 1 3 4 5
erv erv 10:48 pm 11 Jul 10

Maybe Hutch wouldnt be so short staffed if he wasnt so quick to fire his best workers over rumours from other lazy jealous workers. Sorry hutch but wake up to yourself, you made your bed.
It seems everyone wants kids to work for nothing and be perfect at their jobs. All these franchise owners like hutch or the managers of subway etc think they can run a business, employ 15 yr olds to work 24/7 for peanuts and have a perfect business and booming profits. sorry but they all live in a dreamland.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 7:01 pm 07 Jul 10

All kids should work part time in a basic job for at least a couple of years, to learn about work ethic and acceptable behaviour. It would also make some of them a bit more grateful for more skilled jobs when they get them (some of the graduates where I work could sure use an attitude adjustment).

p1 p1 4:42 pm 07 Jul 10

robyncatwoman said :

Maybe a lot of people don’t know this yet; it is compulsory in the ACT to stay in education or training (ie school or apprenticeship) until the age of 17. You therefore won’t be finding any full-time employees below that age; it would be illegal unless they somehow managed full-time hours working on top of school hours.

Unless they are from interstate? Or doing Grade 12 at TAFE after hours?

robyncatwoman robyncatwoman 3:38 pm 07 Jul 10

Die Lefty Scum said :

Gen Y’ers are lazy and insolent, I should know – I have 2 of them living under my roof. My youngest is 16 and has no interest in working despite not attending college anymore. I guess its hard to find the time to put in job applications in between games of Grand Theft Auto. My eldest is 18 and was fired from his job at Red Rooster a few months ago for skimming. If I had’ve known all those years ago that they’d turn out to be such bums I’d have given them the baby Adam treatment.

Your daughter should be at school or other training until she is 17; didn’t you know that? You could be the one in trouble for this absence.

If your children are this lazy, insolent and one is a thief to boot, you can and should blame yourself. Parents develop their children’s attitudes, one way or another, passively or actively.

Blathnat Blathnat 3:19 pm 07 Jul 10

I’m technically a member of Gen Y, and while I’m not currently employed (I am at Uni though) I wouldn’t call myself lazy. The problem is, as many have pointed out, that the wages and conditions are just terrible. I remember my first job at Coles 8 years ago when I was 17, and looking now for casual jobs I cringe at what is expected. The wages barely more than they were back then (I used to be on $17/hour, now I’m lucky to be offered $19). Apart from that, we are expected to work more hours just so we continue to get shifts, and it is nearly impossible to find anything except full time or casual work (what ever happened to part timers getting 15 hours?). Not only that, but centrelink will take 50c for every dollar you earn away from its payments, meaning that you’re essentially working for half price, and lets face it, why would I want to work MORE to get paid LESS?

robyncatwoman robyncatwoman 2:56 pm 07 Jul 10

Maybe a lot of people don’t know this yet; it is compulsory in the ACT to stay in education or training (ie school or apprenticeship) until the age of 17. You therefore won’t be finding any full-time employees below that age; it would be illegal unless they somehow managed full-time hours working on top of school hours.

It is true that many ACT teenagers are receiving so much pocket money and anything else they want (as well as need) from their parents that they can’t be bothered working. When they do have jobs, their parents condone their calling in sick when they can’t be bothered working. This attitude overflows to work attitude at school, with students and parents alike expecting good grades even if students don’t ever hand in work or turn up for class.

My daughters expected to pay their way and did, working part-time in retail or other low-paying jobs, studying full or part-time and paying tertiary fees, borrowing and paying off car loans. They are as disgusted as I am at parents’ paying their adult children’s car registration or or paying them “pocket money” even after they are in “proper” full-time employment and not living with their parents.

Having said all that, my daughters NEVER worked in fast food places; the thought was repulsive to them and in Canberra there is always another job somewhere.

Other reasons students don’t stay on in fast food places or supermarkets are:
these employers often try to force students to work during school time or after midnight;
job locations are difficult to get to without parental help and the petrol cost and inconvenience can outweigh the benefits of having a job.

Daspuck Daspuck 2:07 pm 06 Jul 10

If money’s the only thing that can inspire a kid to work, then no kid is going to want to work in entry level fastfood/hospitality/retail jobs. That’s a fair amount of hours they’d have to do before they could even come close to affording a xbox360 or an iphone. Much easier to wait for the parents to buy it for them.

Casual jobs used to have an element of status when I was growing up. Even HAVING a job (be it McDonalds or wherever) was the thing to do, and if you were lucky enough to land Stock Jeans (ooh memories) or Footlocker you hit the jackpot. Was also because the crew you’d work with were all in the same boat so you’d make friends of your own age from nearby schools and it’d all just be fun fun fun..

These days if you were to work at Hungry Jacks or McDonalds you’d more likely end up working with middle aged ethnic people; while the “youth of today” could really benefit from cultural exchanges with people old enough to be their parents, it’s probably not something 16yo kids see as a cool way to spend their Saturdays.

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 11:04 am 02 Jul 10

cleo said :

Die Lefty Scum

I say give them an choice, go back to school or get a job, if not leave home

Here, here! Is there anything better for building society than desperate, desolate children?

Jim Jones Jim Jones 9:42 am 02 Jul 10

cleo said :

Die Lefty Scum

I say give them an choice, go back to school or get a job, if not leave home

Yeah, you should turf your children onto the street without any means of support, that’s the right thing to do.

cleo cleo 12:18 am 02 Jul 10

Die Lefty Scum I say give them an choice, go back to school or get a job, if not leave home

Icepoet Icepoet 6:00 pm 01 Jul 10

vg said :

Icepoet said :

VG

You’re right – lower level full time jobs do tend to lead to higher level ones and I am currently working one low level (supermarket) job and one mid level (not aps but equivilent APS 5) job for a large research centre. I work more than 40 hours per week in these two jobs to pay for my university studies as I do not want to be receiving government money to study and have still managed to maintain my HD average. I work damn hard. The APS is certainly not the be all and end all and as I said I haven’t fully investigated other options yet – I am still testing the waters to see what’s around and to see what I might be suited to for when I finish studies at the end of the year. I also have nearly 10 years of work experience in other low/mid level jobs. I am not approaching my job search with the attitude of ‘only the perfect job will do’.

To be honest I don’t even know what the perfect job is. Which is partly the reason why I’m intersted in a graduate program so I can gain some experience in a variety of roles and hopefully find something that I’m both good at and enjoy.

I’ve no doubt there will be a job for me at the end of my studies – whatever it may be, but I hark back to Mark’s original comment to which I was replying – where he stated that it’s hard for a university graduate to get a position within the APS straight out of university. I wanted to share my experience to let others know that it really is hard. Are there other jobs out there as or even more competitive? Sure there are. But I posted to support Mark’s comment about the difficulty.

@Rebcart – thanks for your advice, that sounds like a good plan if I don’t make it through this round of offers.

@Mark – Best of luck with your job search too. I hope you find something soon. Ps. (Don’t you just hate those silly aptitude tests?)

Good to see you have a sound work ethic anyway, but don’t think working 40hrs a week and studying makes you special these days. I got my Masters whilst working 40-50 hrs a week and doing on call and overtime.

Good luck with your endeavours though

Nope – not special. Just determined to make a better life for myself – and that may well be outside of the public service. Thanks though for your good wishes. 🙂

Glad to hear you’ve got something on the go Mark. Hope it pans out into something more permanent for you.

Mark Mark 5:44 pm 01 Jul 10

@Icepoet – the aptitude tests lol…everyone at the assessment centre bitched about those.

It’s good to share how hard it is, because no one else seems to be talking about it these days, and my older friends are like, “the public service is easy to get into”, of course they remember the days when any seat-filler would be snatched up in the pre-GFC climate. I think that’s the issue as a lot of people aren’t retiring, and Departments don’t have the budget for additional fulltime staff.

Yeah, I’ve got 2 short term APS contracts (both 4s) coming up soon – so I’m just going to be strategic in both scenarios and try to get them extended. The last one, my supervisor was so nice but said they don’t have the budget now.

colourful sydney racing identity colourful sydney racing identity 1:34 pm 30 Jun 10

divion123 said :

Offer better pay & conditions?

Unlikely! The Labour government through that amazing workers’ friend > the Fair Pay Commission refused to grant a pay increase to 41,000 casual workers at McDonalds last Thursday!
quote]

Completely factually incorrect.

Jim Jones Jim Jones 12:21 pm 30 Jun 10

I’d be worried if teenagers weren’t lazy and insolent. They were in my day. The ones that weren’t were boring little tits.

Cameron Cameron 11:44 am 30 Jun 10

thelozenger said :

I am so sick and tired of people complaining that Gen Y are lazy.

The problem with some of these retail/hospitality places is that they expect High School/Uni students to treat their casual job like nothing else matters. When I was in Year 11 I was working at Woolworths doing 4 supervisor shifts a week (8-10 hours each) and then they would get angry with me when they called up asking me to do another shift and I said no. School was my priority because it would help me with the rest of my life whereas Woolies was just a temporary job until I finished school. They expect teenagers to be available 24/7 and drop everything to work another shift.

I work in clubs now, and the pay is much better (thanks to poker machines) and the management is much for understanding with things like exams, other commitments ect, but it’s still hard sometimes because of the hours. I try to get Office type jobs but employers seem to want semi-retired or return to work mums for those jobs, not students.

Also, someone said that the reason Gen Y are lazy is that it’s because they just stay at home for longer, not moving out ect.

For a student, it is really difficult to move out of home. One, landlords don’t want to rent out to share houses- the only way students can afford to move out- and with the rental shortage, it is almost impossible to get a place. Who are you going to rent out to? Three students or a young professional couple with jobs in the public service? Two- with the pitiful amount of Youth Allowance & work you can do, its hard money wise to move out (the only students I know living out of home all have help from their parents.)

I work very hard, both at uni and when at work, as do most people I know. I hate the stereotype that Gen Y have. Either way, it’s a lot harder these days for us. I’m 20 years old and know that I will probably never be able to buy a house, because it’s just too expensive and that the profession I want to go into rarely pays well (unless you get lucky.) You baby boomers and Gen Xs can’t say that can you? It was just a given that after working for a while, you buy a house, pay it off, ect.

Mate, I’m certainly only referring to when my staff were working. If casual staff knocked back shifts, that was certainly their prerogative and I never had a problem with it. What they do with their own time is entirely their business, and if they choose to make work a lower priority, good for them. But when they are working I expect them to treat my business like it’s the only priority – because for the time I’m paying them, it is.

Every business has downtime and I encouraged staff to take full advantage of that – but the lazy and insolent attributes I described are unacceptable whether they rate my business and their wage as a priority in their life or not.

vg vg 10:46 am 30 Jun 10

Icepoet said :

VG

You’re right – lower level full time jobs do tend to lead to higher level ones and I am currently working one low level (supermarket) job and one mid level (not aps but equivilent APS 5) job for a large research centre. I work more than 40 hours per week in these two jobs to pay for my university studies as I do not want to be receiving government money to study and have still managed to maintain my HD average. I work damn hard. The APS is certainly not the be all and end all and as I said I haven’t fully investigated other options yet – I am still testing the waters to see what’s around and to see what I might be suited to for when I finish studies at the end of the year. I also have nearly 10 years of work experience in other low/mid level jobs. I am not approaching my job search with the attitude of ‘only the perfect job will do’.

To be honest I don’t even know what the perfect job is. Which is partly the reason why I’m intersted in a graduate program so I can gain some experience in a variety of roles and hopefully find something that I’m both good at and enjoy.

I’ve no doubt there will be a job for me at the end of my studies – whatever it may be, but I hark back to Mark’s original comment to which I was replying – where he stated that it’s hard for a university graduate to get a position within the APS straight out of university. I wanted to share my experience to let others know that it really is hard. Are there other jobs out there as or even more competitive? Sure there are. But I posted to support Mark’s comment about the difficulty.

@Rebcart – thanks for your advice, that sounds like a good plan if I don’t make it through this round of offers.

@Mark – Best of luck with your job search too. I hope you find something soon. Ps. (Don’t you just hate those silly aptitude tests?)

Good to see you have a sound work ethic anyway, but don’t think working 40hrs a week and studying makes you special these days. I got my Masters whilst working 40-50 hrs a week and doing on call and overtime.

Good luck with your endeavours though

Icepoet Icepoet 9:34 am 30 Jun 10

VG

You’re right – lower level full time jobs do tend to lead to higher level ones and I am currently working one low level (supermarket) job and one mid level (not aps but equivilent APS 5) job for a large research centre. I work more than 40 hours per week in these two jobs to pay for my university studies as I do not want to be receiving government money to study and have still managed to maintain my HD average. I work damn hard. The APS is certainly not the be all and end all and as I said I haven’t fully investigated other options yet – I am still testing the waters to see what’s around and to see what I might be suited to for when I finish studies at the end of the year. I also have nearly 10 years of work experience in other low/mid level jobs. I am not approaching my job search with the attitude of ‘only the perfect job will do’.

To be honest I don’t even know what the perfect job is. Which is partly the reason why I’m intersted in a graduate program so I can gain some experience in a variety of roles and hopefully find something that I’m both good at and enjoy.

I’ve no doubt there will be a job for me at the end of my studies – whatever it may be, but I hark back to Mark’s original comment to which I was replying – where he stated that it’s hard for a university graduate to get a position within the APS straight out of university. I wanted to share my experience to let others know that it really is hard. Are there other jobs out there as or even more competitive? Sure there are. But I posted to support Mark’s comment about the difficulty.

@Rebcart – thanks for your advice, that sounds like a good plan if I don’t make it through this round of offers.

@Mark – Best of luck with your job search too. I hope you find something soon. Ps. (Don’t you just hate those silly aptitude tests?)

Deadmandrinking Deadmandrinking 6:20 am 30 Jun 10

Agree with VG (Again! What is happening to me?). There’s heaps of jobs out there in Canberra – not just a Dominos. Working these sort of jobs will give you some kind of experience and can give you extra sets of skills to fall back on.

Thelozenger – I know exactly where you’re coming from. The guilt trips about not staying back caused me to cave in and fall to sleep in class in the morning. The good thing is, though, is that it’s near impossible to get fired. I called in ‘sick’ almost every week and kept my job.

Mark Mark 11:41 pm 29 Jun 10

@ Icepoet: I know! And the Graduate Assessment days, if you’re lucky to even be invited, are just a series of hurdles and hoops that only those with job experience can handle. Then there’s the charming APS ‘merit’ process, translation: graduates with employment experience temping in our Department will get through.

You’ve got a bloody HD average, I’ve only got Credit!…It’s like their zealously seeking perfection.

It’s not about grades it’s about connections.

vg vg 8:25 pm 29 Jun 10

Icepoet said :

I am currently completing my honours year of my 2nd degree at university and have applied for numerous graduate positions within APS departments for 2011.

I have a high distinction GPA, am on track for first class honours and as a mature aged student have 10 years of work experience behind me.

Of the eight departments that I applied for a graduate position with for next year, I received seven rejections. In some cases, such as the Department of Broadband and Communications I was competing against 600 applicants for just 12 positions. The Department of Human services had over 1200 applications for less than 100 positions.

I am still in the process of being assessed for one final department, but have accepted that if I do not make it through the selection process there I will probably be looking for a temp job early next year simply to get my foot in the door.

There’s plenty of full time work you can engage in while you seek your best choice of employment. The best position from which to seek a full time job is being in one currently. Sure you may not be in the job you see yourself in for the rest of your life, but prior to my current employ I was a furniture removalist, garbage man, nightclub bouncer and clerical assistant in the APS. Beggars can’t be choosers

« Previous 1 3 4 5

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2019 Region Group Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site