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Amber Rams Again

By Jazz 5 November 2007 31

Amber Jane Westin has rammed another elderly woman and been sentenced again, this time for assault with a shopping trolley (no license for that either) according to this ABC story. Shes been sentenced to 2 months gaol to be served at the same time as her current sentence.

The story says that she was serving 7 months for her last killing, but I thought it was eighteen, possibly she has seven months to go or have they reduced her sentence for good behaviour?

What’s Your opinion?


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Amber Rams Again
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Zilog 1:33 pm 16 Mar 08

1. Rumours of sexual abuse are almost certainly nonsense; dad has not been resident for 15 years (interstate).
2. Abortions, well, who’ll cast the first stone?
3. Yes mum was quite abusive, but elder sister thrived notwithstanding. And brother is not disturbed, nor is AJ; just criminal (jordan serving 2 years armed rob)
4. Pot’s a minor habit. She’s been a junkie every day for about 5 years. Then, at the scene, at every hearing, now. Comprehendo? Everything that has occurred has never had anything to do with pot. It has always been about smack and benzo’s.

Deadmandrinking 2:47 pm 08 Nov 07

Maelinar, the fact that I somehow (at least partially) agree with you is frightening, but it’s true. Prisons rarely rehabilitate nowadays, being violent holes where alot of prisoners tend to rely on primal ‘take or have taken from you’ psyches that carry on outside prison. Although, complete isolation can have it’s downsides as well. Prisoners can get very lonely and very depressed, which can lead to suicide.
And special G, you seem to have no idea about what I said. I don’t agree with you. Prisons aren’t rehabs, especially with the amount of drugs that do get smuggled in there and the lack of offering alternatives to use. Same with chain gangs. That’s mainly simple labor (which isn’t that bad, considering skills that might be learned). What I meant is that the offenders work (presumably after spending time in rehab) in areas relative to the nature of their crime, i.e. working with victims of crime (not their own victims, though, of course). Big difference, Special G. The world isn’t plain and simple, I’m afraid.

Lord Mælinar 6:57 am 08 Nov 07

Halve, even quarter prison terms, but spend them on your own in isolation.

Cross pollination of criminal skills is subsequently reduced to 0, and effect of rehab etc is multiplied as the transfer of illicit substances within the prison is also reduced to 0.

Crims actually come out of prison clean.

Somehow, you all know this makes a lot of sense.

Special G 5:45 am 08 Nov 07

Ok lets analyse your suggestion.

Forcing rehab – this is what prison is supposed to be doing. Getting them off drugs and rehabilitated with skills etc to reenter society.
Community service – chain gangs whilst doing te forced rehab.

Long terms of hard labour with chain gangs doing community service.

maybe I do agree with you DMD

Deadmandrinking 12:34 am 08 Nov 07

What? By putting her down?
I did offer an alternative: “(i.e. forcing offenders to stay in rehab, perhaps even community service in areas that deal with the effects of crimes like those the offender committed)” and whilst it’s not viable at this time, neither is capital punishment.

nyssa76 6:58 pm 07 Nov 07

DMD, she doesn’t deserve a second chance. She had it and then some before she was sentenced.

But here’s a spin on your good vs. bad upbringing.

My sister – the druggie – was favoured, given whatever she wanted and became a thief and a druggie.

I was treated most harshly by my step-dad (her father), the extent of which I will not discuss here, and still I managed to become a teacher, get married, have children (one at 18yo), finish 3 degrees and function as a good member of society.

It’s called making people accountable for their actions REGARDLESS of their upbringing. By the age of 18, we all know right from wrong. We all know that being a dickhead will piss people off.

Most of all we should know that our actions have consequences.

Special G 6:51 pm 07 Nov 07

DMD, I don’t see any alternatives being offered up by yourself. Yay laets fix the problem. How? At least others are offering up their opinions on how to fix the issues at hand.

Deadmandrinking 2:50 pm 07 Nov 07

sorry to double post, but I need to correct something.
“But one glance at the sheer amount of criminals, heroin addicts and hell, even alcoholics that are second, even third” should have had ‘generation’ at the end of it.

Deadmandrinking 2:48 pm 07 Nov 07

Big Dave, you really are a big D-. I was being very very hypothetical, as it clearly should have shown. I would never have Amber at my house, because as I clearly said, I don’t know her, and she also doesn’t seem to be the kind of person I’d hang out with. But that doesn’t mean I don’t sympathize with her AS WELL AS the victims.
Her actions seem to me to be more self-estructive than anything. Obviously with her running from the cops. The shopping centre incedent seems to have come about as a result of her associations with certain types of people.
That’s not to say that her actions are justified. She has problems, problems, Nysaa, yes I’m looking at you, that hav, by all accounts been seeded within her upbringing. Yes, some people do elevate from bad upbringings and become successful and model members of society. But one glance at the sheer amount of criminals, heroin addicts and hell, even alcoholics that are second, even third, clearly shows that such people are the exception rather than the rule (I’ve a feeling that’s been said before here).
So what should we do about these people when their problems start to affect the suburban fantasy-lands of the middle-class? Lock them away and forget about them? That seems to me to be a fairly soft-ass approach to running society.
I’m not saying that such actions should go without consequences – I’m saying that these consequences should have a more pro-active approach. Unfortunately, the current alternatives to prison are almost voluntary on the offenders part and in so forth, mostly ineffective, especially in cases of long term drug-addicts. Those alternatives need more work, both in availability and the legislation that makes them effective (i.e. forcing offenders to stay in rehab, perhaps even community service in areas that deal with the effects of crimes like those the offender committed).
The longer people like you, Nyssa and Big Jerk, sweep problems like these under the carpet and forget about them, the longer they fester. Maybe you should be doing something instead of complaining about your warm little bubbles floating too close to people who live in the real world.

BigDave 12:46 pm 07 Nov 07

Deadmandrinking, you are a complete idiot. It’s morons like you with your soft arsed attitudes that have got countries like ours in to the current state we find ourselves in. We can’t punish these little scumbags accordingly because of it. And you reckon you’d put her up in your house??? BULLS**T!! Stop talking out of your backside, and do something to alleviate the problem instead of fuelling it!

Dark and Mysterious 11:09 am 07 Nov 07

I have to agree, Nyssa. My sympathies are with her victims, and I include any children she has the care of in that list. She’s all grown up now and has responsibility for her actions, but who is thinking about her children in all this mess? How are they meant to make sensible choices and avoid following in their mother’s footsteps?

I have to also note in passing that her friend, mentioned in the newspaper article, sounds like a real piece of work.

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