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Jerk Cyclist

By johnboy - 15 November 2013 27

As cheap cameras proliferate we get more and more of a look at each other. And thanks to YouTube all can see.

John Smith sent this into us:

Check this guy out, what a jerk!

cyclists

What’s Your opinion?


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27 Responses to
Jerk Cyclist
JC 4:26 pm 18 Nov 13

tim_c said :

Are you sure they’re weight activated? I had a few problems with some lights previously and reported some intersections to Canberra Connect. I had a very helpful chap call me about it (he also cycled) and following his suggestions, I now stop on the sensors (look for the patched grooves) – it works better if you stop along the patched grooves that are parallel to your direction of travel which means your bike is along the sensor (rather than across it). Failing that, you can also try riding circles over the sensors since they are actually induction loops which means they are triggered by the movement of metal (rather than just the presence of metal). Since following these suggestions, I’ve never had any further problems – even on my aluminium framed bike with alloy wheels.

There are no weight sensors. All are induction loops that require a bit of metal to pass over the top, how much metal depends upon how sensitively tuned they are. Some loops you can see, some, especially newly resurfaced intersections are below the top layer of asphalt and hence are not visible.

Though do agree with what he was saying that we could do with less of the turn signals in this town. Not every intersection needs them on 24/7.

tim_c 2:27 pm 18 Nov 13

Robertson said :

“Are you a cop” seems like a perfectly reasonable response. He doesn’t believe in your rules. He is not licenced to cycle on the road. His conveyance is not registered to be cycled on the road. This means there has been virtually no effort made by the state to ensure that he becomes aware of any rights and responsibilities he might have.
In fact, the state’s failure to take steps to impose any kind of limits to his cycling behaviour seems like tacit approval for him to make up his own rules, as he has done.

Try jay-walking your unlicensed, unregistered shoes across a busy intersection in the CBD of Melbourne then.

Robertson 12:27 pm 18 Nov 13

“Are you a cop” seems like a perfectly reasonable response. He doesn’t believe in your rules. He is not licenced to cycle on the road. His conveyance is not registered to be cycled on the road. This means there has been virtually no effort made by the state to ensure that he becomes aware of any rights and responsibilities he might have.
In fact, the state’s failure to take steps to impose any kind of limits to his cycling behaviour seems like tacit approval for him to make up his own rules, as he has done.

Gungahlin Al 11:40 am 18 Nov 13

Yeah that’s just stupid. Good on you for speaking out. I get the same reaction though when chipping people who whip past me in traffic without any warning. Bell? What bell? That would add weight… (4gs)

Holden Caulfield 11:18 am 18 Nov 13

I’ve yet to find the right frame of mind or opportunity to do it, but I do sometimes wonder if a cyclist running a red light like that would get a surprise if a car (or cars) just followed their lead to run the red light too.

Yes, yes, two wrongs and all that, it’s just a scenario that amuses my (sometimes) small mind at times. 😛

tim_c 11:17 am 18 Nov 13

Jethro said :

taninaus said :

good on you for challenging him – if you cycle on the road you get to obey the road rules.

I’m going to agree with you 98%.

There are, unfortunately, a couple of intersections where cyclists have little choice but to run the red.

eg. Turning right from Emu Bank into Benjamin Way… The right arrow is a weight activated light, so if you pull up on your bike, you will sit there until a car arrives to trigger the green arrow. Considering the fact you are facing a straight road with oncoming traffic (or complete lack thereof) clearly visible, running the red is the only sensible option, particularly early in the morning, when you might otherwise sit on a completely empty road (in all directions) for 10 minutes or so.

Canberra needs to be more willing to remove the red arrow light when the green straight ahead light is showing (every other city allows its adult populations to determine if they can turn right across traffic without a green arrow). It also needs to create a road law that allows cyclists to run reds on weight activated lights.

Are you sure they’re weight activated? I had a few problems with some lights previously and reported some intersections to Canberra Connect. I had a very helpful chap call me about it (he also cycled) and following his suggestions, I now stop on the sensors (look for the patched grooves) – it works better if you stop along the patched grooves that are parallel to your direction of travel which means your bike is along the sensor (rather than across it). Failing that, you can also try riding circles over the sensors since they are actually induction loops which means they are triggered by the movement of metal (rather than just the presence of metal). Since following these suggestions, I’ve never had any further problems – even on my aluminium framed bike with alloy wheels.

tim_c 11:04 am 18 Nov 13

“Why should I care?” he says!
Because some motorists think that you running a red light is adequate justification for running you down at the next opportunity. At least now I know why some drivers don’t want to share the road with me when I’m on my bike.

Roundhead89 5:47 pm 17 Nov 13

Do people still wear jeans whilst cycling? Back in the pre-lycra days in the 1970s when you could only buy flared jeans you had to use a cycling clip otherwise you would get caught up in the chain and your jeans would be torn and full of sprocket holes and also sport a large black oil stain which did not come out in the wash.

FXST01 4:01 pm 17 Nov 13

junglespank said :

which one’s the jerk?

The one you see in the mirror every morning.

junglespank 2:04 am 17 Nov 13

which one’s the jerk?

Jethro 11:42 pm 16 Nov 13

taninaus said :

good on you for challenging him – if you cycle on the road you get to obey the road rules.

I’m going to agree with you 98%.

There are, unfortunately, a couple of intersections where cyclists have little choice but to run the red.

eg. Turning right from Emu Bank into Benjamin Way… The right arrow is a weight activated light, so if you pull up on your bike, you will sit there until a car arrives to trigger the green arrow. Considering the fact you are facing a straight road with oncoming traffic (or complete lack thereof) clearly visible, running the red is the only sensible option, particularly early in the morning, when you might otherwise sit on a completely empty road (in all directions) for 10 minutes or so.

Canberra needs to be more willing to remove the red arrow light when the green straight ahead light is showing (every other city allows its adult populations to determine if they can turn right across traffic without a green arrow). It also needs to create a road law that allows cyclists to run reds on weight activated lights.

Ekeia 11:37 pm 16 Nov 13

Good job standing up to him!

taninaus 7:06 pm 16 Nov 13

good on you for challenging him – if you cycle on the road you get to obey the road rules.

Alderney 3:58 pm 16 Nov 13

Surely he can’t be a jerk, he wasn’t wearing lycra…

kumadude 9:49 am 16 Nov 13

You dear sir, OP, are a most distinguished person of the community, I can not say the same for the dude pedalling with sweaty nut jeans. I always stopped at pedestrian crossings and lights to allow the traffic to proceed. Though the laws are different in the ACT, as a NSWelshman crossings are always for the pedestrians, so I waited. Glad to see you gave the hipster tryhard curry,

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