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Kids: how loud is too loud in Canberra?

By Gerry-Built 3 October 2013 56

Following lunch at a Belconnen fast food ‘restaurant’ outdoor playground today; when I gave my kids the 2 minute warning I was smuggly and rudely told my children were being too loud by another parent (“oh good, does that mean we’re only going to be subjected to the yelling and screaming for another two minutes!?”).

Whilst I’d happily admit my response, while initially constrained (Excuse me!? It’s a kids’ playground!”); was not entirely appropriate (flipped her “the bird” – which I apologised for afterward);

I’m interested to know reader’s opinions of loud boisterous behaviour from children in an outdoor play venue (albeit confined and glassed in – trapping sound).

Was I over the line allowing my kids to be “yelling and screaming” whilst playing in an outdoor play area?

What’s Your opinion?


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56 Responses to
Kids: how loud is too loud in Canberra?
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Gerry-Built 10:02 am 05 Oct 13

I’m pretty sure the answer I sought has been 100% clarified. There is disagreement about what constitutes an “outdoor play area”. In view of that, I accept her opinion that my children were being inappropriately loud. I am prepared to err on the side of caution. I undertake to be more considerate of “grey areas” in response. Though I’m still happy to argue semantics with the nit-pickers.

I absolutely do not accept that her initial contact was an acceptable form of communicating her issue; and neither was my “parting shot”. We are both to blame for the way things were handled; although I insist she chose and set the tone of our interaction.

What I would ask is; if any of you ever feel the need to pull someone up over their behaviour (or that of children under their care) – please don’t frame it in an aggressive way; that only invites an aggressive response – and there are already far too many real issues we all have to deal with than to make new ones from simple issues that could easily be resolved in a more peaceful, respectful manner; therefore modeling it for our future adults…

Gerry-Built 8:54 am 05 Oct 13

Masquara said :

It sounds as though it’s an enclosed space, not outdoor, so a responsible parent would have ensured they didn’t shriek and scream and annoy the people nearby. No doubt they were humiliated when Gerry-built flipped the bird. Bad parenting.

Outdoors, but has 6ft high glass fence around it.

No kids; not hers, not mine – saw that – and I both acknowledge that was reactionary, poor form AND apologised for it. I take your point on considering it and enclosed space…

Blathnat 2:08 am 05 Oct 13

“Children should be seen and not heard”.

Even after nearly 600 years, this statement has not lost it’s value.

Basically, both parents were in the wrong (other than the fact they are feeding their children that “food”).
You were in the wrong for calling attention to it, and making a potential scene in front of your children, and their children (as well as any others who were there). You should have kept quiet and ignored the parent.
They also should have stayed quiet, and waited that 20 seconds for you to leave before making snide remarks. Teaching children to be passive-aggressive is not a good thing.

As others have said though, it’s a playground not a cafe. Provided your children weren’t being obnoxious (swearing, hitting, etc) and weren’t being excessively loud (I have met children who have no problems screaming at the top of their lungs whilst running up and down a hallway for 20 minutes at any time of day) then the other parent should have expected as much.

Postalgeek 10:25 pm 04 Oct 13

Masquara said :

It sounds as though it’s an enclosed space, not outdoor, so a responsible parent would have ensured they didn’t shriek and scream and annoy the people nearby. No doubt they were humiliated when Gerry-built flipped the bird. Bad parenting.

Guess the “outdoor playground” in the first sentence of the OP means different things to different people.

JessP 10:01 pm 04 Oct 13

Masquara said :

It sounds as though it’s an enclosed space, not outdoor, so a responsible parent would have ensured they didn’t shriek and scream and annoy the people nearby. No doubt they were humiliated when Gerry-built flipped the bird. Bad parenting.

Oh please. It was a KIDS PLAYGROUND at a fast food restaurant. Get a life. If it was a real restaurant, cafe or even a club I would agree but it wasn’t acceptable behaviour but …….. It was Hungry Jacks FFS!

Masquara 7:12 pm 04 Oct 13

It sounds as though it’s an enclosed space, not outdoor, so a responsible parent would have ensured they didn’t shriek and scream and annoy the people nearby. No doubt they were humiliated when Gerry-built flipped the bird. Bad parenting.

neanderthalsis 3:25 pm 04 Oct 13

JessP said :

Gerry
Some people dont like to see kids having fun, being loud, happy and well, kid like. .

Kids should not be encouraged to have fun. Childhood should sap the soul in preparation for an adult life that is banal, boring and a constant source of disappointment.

Postalgeek 3:18 pm 04 Oct 13

I wouldn’t worry, Gerry. Going to a kids playground and complaining about yelling kids is like sticking your hand in the kitchen sink grinder and complaining about the pain.

JessP 12:21 pm 04 Oct 13

Gerry
Some people dont like to see kids having fun, being loud, happy and well, kid like. Their idea of noise levels when it comes to kids play areas is very different to mine or yours. I respect their thoughts but I still think they are d*ckh%$ds.

Mr Jess jnr is now a teenager and barely talks let alone makes a ruckus in a play ground…but did in the past. Loved Maccas and HJs (going through a period of only wanting to eat Maccas or HJ or sausages if I remember rightly) and is 185cm tall and a sports nut playing Union, AFL and cricket. Didnt do him much harm….still loves a slushy.

Yes, there are some uptight parents out there. The better response would have been to say ‘Yes, only 2 more minutes, have a nice day’ and walk away…. But if it had been me I would have undoubtably reacted the same way.

Your doing a great job, spending time with your kids, having fun, letting them have fun and a SLUSHY (WHOO HOO). Whats not to love! Enjoy…they will be non communicative teens before you know it.

Have a great weekend.

BimboGeek 11:21 am 04 Oct 13

When I’m feeling lazy or tired I just throw some red lentils and frozen vegies in a pot and call it soup. It’s no less healthy than any other soup but pretty quick considering the only prep is rinsing the lentils.

As for noisy kids, they don’t bother me as long as it’s outside. Inside noisy or running kids make me nervous. Outside they can scream and make mud pies for all I care. Just remember to hose them off and stick a bit of fruit in their gob to shut them up when they come back in.

And yes a slushy is ok as a treat but still too much sugar and colouring for anything other than birthdays and christmas. This can make kids annoyingly loud and boisterous. Home made juice pops or juice slushies are much better.

But in conclusion, you can safely assume that passive agressive bitches are just being bitchy.

PugGirl 10:36 am 04 Oct 13

Robertson said :

Pitchka said :

Robertson said :

My children dine on good, wholesome food, preferably bought in-season or on-special. The cost per meal varies, but would usually be somewhere between 75c and $4.

If I felt like spending close to $10 feeding them, then yes, I would by an expensive cut of meat and make a delicious meal of it.

People who spend big wads of cash buying the tasteless and barely-edible garbage on offer at McDonalds are displaying an extremely poor decision-making ability.

That’s pretty harsh. I wish I had the mental and physical energy to prepare home cooked, nutritious meals at home EVERY NIGHT, but sometimes I am so tired from looking after the family that I relent and allow McDonald’s. Not very often, but every now and then. The kids love it and have a good time, so what’s the problem? Better to stay sane than worry about the odd meal of ‘barely-edible garbage’ that your kids must ‘endure’ (or should I say ‘relish’).

DrKoresh 5:15 pm 03 Oct 13

Macca’s brings out the best in parents, I find. I remember being honked at by a mum with kids as I was crossing the entrance to Dickson Macca’s carpark with a group of mates during a free period at College. We were just walking along the footpath and we had right of way so I gave her the finger told her what I thought of her. Maybe it’s not the thing to do in front of kids but I was still a kid then too, technically, but her reaction (following us down the road in her soccer-mum SUV yelling at us not “f***ing swear in front of [her] ****ing kids”) was priceless. At least I was assured that any damage my actions might done to the kids in the back had already been done by Mummy Dearest, but still, people are crazy.

Watson 4:19 pm 03 Oct 13

Just one of those post that brings out the ‘haters will hate’ kind of posters, hey.

People can hardly expect you to carry a decibel gauge to make sure your kids don’t yell or laugh that little bit too loud. We know what appropriate levels are inside a restaurant for example. “Normal speaking voice” level. That’s easy to assess and control. But at a playground? Totally subjective and really not that important.

Agree, let kids be kids. And people who are that quick to judge – referring to both the parent in the story and some commenters – probably do so because of some major insecurity or guilt complex or something. I do not trust them so I ignore them.

Gerry-Built 3:54 pm 03 Oct 13

Gerry-Built said :

I don’t know how you…

“you”; not directed at A-cog… (more at those saying I was rude and out of line)

Pitchka 3:53 pm 03 Oct 13

Gerry-Built said :

A_Cog said :

I defy anyone to not return volley if your children are attacked to your face…

You only have to read my replys to see im on your side, infact, i dont even know why you bothered apologising about giving her the bird..

Gerry-Built 3:50 pm 03 Oct 13

A_Cog said :

Don’t fret over your choices by attempting to validate them via RA input, avoid getting into fisti-cuffs over a trivial issue, and let their/your frustrations go.

I’m not “trying to validate my actions”; I own them, good or bad. I made a poor choice at the end of this 2 minute interaction; which I apologised for. I was quite civil until then; despite the verbal abuse she gave me in front of ALL our kids; including telling me my kids “belong in a zoo”…

I was wondering what people though was too loud, for a child’s playground at a “restaurant”; and I’m prepared to change my position on that given some of the RA hivemind feedback. I don’t know how you can focus on my rudeness – letting one solitary bird fly; when she started off in the way she did. I defy anyone to not return volley if your children are attacked to your face…

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