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Snorkel Massey’s soon to be resumed reign of terror

By johnboy - 6 October 2011 41

We’ve been waiting a while for this gem, but the Supreme Court has published the sentencing of Mathew James Massey and Fakatounaulupe Ngata. (Mathew is known in some circles as “snorkel” after an attempt to make like Gary Cooper and evade police using a snorkel made out of a reed).

The standover tactics of Mr Ngata make for a fascinating read all of its own, but it’s gold when it comes to Mr Massey (yes of the infamous crime clan).

Mathew Massey, you have a very significant criminal history. That history extends from when you were 14 years of age until you were most recently dealt with by Magistrate Campbell on 10 November 2010. You have, on my calculation, been convicted of nearly 50 prior criminal offences, including serious offences such as armed robbery, escaping custody, assaulting police, assault occasioning actual bodily harm and trafficking in drugs. You have served significant terms of imprisonment. In fact, at the time that you committed the offences now before this Court, you were on parole. There is little by way of leniency that this Court can show you based on that prior history

And yet he will be eligible for parole on the 13th day of this month.

[Photo by TooFarNorth CC BY]

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41 Responses to
Snorkel Massey’s soon to be resumed reign of terror
Jim Jones 4:01 pm 07 Oct 11

Classified said :

neanderthalsis said :

Why can’t we have a Three Strikes law here? Violent recidivists should not be given the chance to repeat offend simply because they can supply the parole board with a sob story about their disadvantage childhood or sick granny. Three Strikes would give a con two chances to rehabilitate before being locked up for life.

Remember the kid in the Northern Territory who go busted un the three strikes rule years ago? It was all over the papers how he was going to be put in a juveline facility for 12 months for stealing a mars bar. The bleeding hearts came out and it became a political nightmare. Of course, no-one seemed so interested in the fact that he was a serial thief…

Yeah, serially stealing stuff like Mars Bars. We definitely need to lock these dangerous criminals up so that society doesn’t disintegrate!!!

MissAppropriation 3:43 pm 07 Oct 11

Sigh. Has anyone thought perhaps our supposed “correctional system’s” focus on discipline instead of rehabilitation and healing is to blame. That perhaps, by locking these people up in an institution that only encourages the psychological behaviour of rebellion, with other ‘criminally minded folk”, might actually be contributing to, if not creating the culture of rebellion and criminal behaviour itself, and encouraging these disadvantaged people to recommit? If not by conditioning them into that pattern of reactionary behaviour, then certainly by providing the adequate criminal networking culture to enable them to re offend on a larger scale. Thoughts?

Chop71 12:25 pm 07 Oct 11

Could be a big night in Civic next Thursday. Keep ya head in!!!

Classified 11:57 am 07 Oct 11

neanderthalsis said :

Why can’t we have a Three Strikes law here? Violent recidivists should not be given the chance to repeat offend simply because they can supply the parole board with a sob story about their disadvantage childhood or sick granny. Three Strikes would give a con two chances to rehabilitate before being locked up for life.

Remember the kid in the Northern Territory who go busted un the three strikes rule years ago? It was all over the papers how he was going to be put in a juveline facility for 12 months for stealing a mars bar. The bleeding hearts came out and it became a political nightmare. Of course, no-one seemed so interested in the fact that he was a serial thief…

neanderthalsis 11:39 am 07 Oct 11

Why can’t we have a Three Strikes law here? Violent recidivists should not be given the chance to repeat offend simply because they can supply the parole board with a sob story about their disadvantage childhood or sick granny. Three Strikes would give a con two chances to rehabilitate before being locked up for life.

p1 11:14 am 07 Oct 11

johnboy said :

Masseys are nothing if not adept at the parole system. Just look how many crimes they commit while out on it!

That is because the bail/parole conditions are too tough, with unfair restrictions (like preventing them from attending there jobs as low life criminal scum).

eh_steve 9:30 am 07 Oct 11

This quote from the victim was interesting…

“I know I owe youse (sic) some money right, but I’ve never disrespected you or anything like that, you know what I mean, like there’s, ever since I’ve known you, there’s been a lot of people that have owed you a lot of money, and you’ve been a…lot more lenient on me.”

I wonder what was involved in the cases where less leniency was displayed?

LSWCHP 11:07 pm 06 Oct 11

Lets cut this bloke some slack and assume that the ACT legal system has made a few mistakes and he’s actually been innocent of 50% of his convictions. This would mean he’d still be guilty of 25 crimes! And that’s only the ones where he was caught.

I’d really, really like some explanation from a judge or some knowledgeable person as to why this bloke isn’t going away for a long time…like 10 years. It’s just inexplicable to most of the rest of us who aren’t judges.

As JB has pointed out on a number of occasions, bugger rehabilitation, sometimes we need incarceration of evildoers simply to protect the rest of us from them. It’s hard to steal a car, sell drugs or do a burg when you’re in the slammer, and that’s a good thing.

Spykler 10:01 pm 06 Oct 11

What does this loser have to do to get any decent jail time- commit genocide? 50 offences and he could be back out??

Classified 9:58 pm 06 Oct 11

farnarkler said :

I’m surprised he’s still alive. There must be a queue of people waiting to get a bit of payback.

Can we sponsor them?

farnarkler 6:10 pm 06 Oct 11

I’m surprised he’s still alive. There must be a queue of people waiting to get a bit of payback.

Deref 5:14 pm 06 Oct 11

Did he have a difficult childhood?

johnboy 4:42 pm 06 Oct 11

p1 said :

And yet he will be eligible for parole on the 13th day of this month.

I would just like to point out to those in positions of responsibility, that “Eligible for Parol” is not synonymous with “Should be Let out of the Clink”.

Masseys are nothing if not adept at the parole system. Just look how many crimes they commit while out on it!

p1 4:23 pm 06 Oct 11

And yet he will be eligible for parole on the 13th day of this month.

I would just like to point out to those in positions of responsibility, that “Eligible for Parol” is not synonymous with “Should be Let out of the Clink”.

EvanJames 3:35 pm 06 Oct 11

If someone is constantly committing crimes (and if they’ve managed to convict him of 50, I hate to think how many they didn’t get him for), why is the court desperately reaching for any reason to show leniency? It’s not like this is a one-off, accidental type thing.

Why can’t people like this be locked up properly, and when they get out, someone is assigned to watch them so that when they commit their next crime, they can be locked up again expeditiously. It would only take a day or so.

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