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The inside out of Deadwood

By Alex Rea 16 July 2018 0
Dee Allchin in her new Braidwood establishment 'Deadwood.' Photos: Supplied

Dee Allchin in her new Braidwood establishment ‘Deadwood.’ Photos: Supplied.

Braidwoodians have long referred to Braidwood as Deadwood – in a lovingly, ironic kind of way. There’s always been so much life and creativity in the place, although it may seem a little sleepy at times when driving through.

Now a new ‘establishment’ has opened called ‘Deadwood.’ Proprietor Dee Allchin already has lots of runs on the board when it comes to hospitality in Braidwood, formerly serving up tasty treats at the old Albion Café, Dee-Licious and The Fickle Pickle.

Just months since moving from her old premises at the café ‘The Fickle Pickle’, Allchin has renovated and opened a new shop, part gallery, part bazaar, part emporium, part nursery, part café and a little bit just community hang-out.

‘Deadwood’ has arrived. The former art studio, furniture workshop, and Braidwood Times office in the 1860s coach house, on Duncan Street, has been transformed by adaptive reuse into a modern business. One of the most photographed buildings in Braidwood, with patina dating back to the 19th century, has been given a makeover to bring the outside in.

The restored exterior of the former coach house.

The restored exterior of the former coach house.

On a cool winter day, you pass from the austere exterior into a tropical gothic interior, with hanging plants, cow skulls and luscious flowers, homewares and the smell of Campos coffee and cakes.

The ceiling has been removed to reveal the original shingled roof slats, now under iron and stable beams, which have been intersected by a massive electrified iron chandelier.

Allchin’s partner Dave Sargent is a whizz with a welder. With his passion for restoring both wood and metal items, Sargent has transformed the building with decorative and functional details and also has some items for sale.

The massive iron chandelier suspended through the rafters.

The massive iron chandelier suspended through the rafters.

All this hard architectural work is offset by the real passion of Allchin – flowers. Bold modern natives and cotton still on the stem, are just some of the natural forms Allchin uses to make stunning arrangements. She will be joined by Inke Falkner to do some floristry workshops in coming months. Locally grown garlic will also be available in season.

Homewares include the rustic glazed pottery made less than 100 metres away by Kate Carruthers and Michael Warner, and antique objects from Longbarn & String from further along Duncan Street.

Not to disappoint former clientele, a full arsenal of locally made pickles and fermented products are available for sale.

There is limited seating in the shop, but it’s a sumptuous spot to drop in for a takeaway and to drink in the sights and smells on offer. The food on offer is a smaller selection of cakes, pastries and soup, including seasonal and local produce.

Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday 8:30 am – 4:00 pm.

Deadwood is just off the main street on Duncan Street, opposite the Landmark Rural Merchandise Store.

A range of pickled and fermented products are available alongside local pottery.

A range of pickled and fermented products are available alongside local pottery.

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