Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Ask RiotACT

Quality childcare in a
welcoming & supportive environment

Anyone care about the public servants losing their jobs?

By mot 16 May 2014 40

There is so much media coverage around the sacking of pilots or car factory workers or pensioners, what about those 16,000 people (many will have to go by Oct this year). These are people with families, people who need to pay for kids’ tuition fees, their medical bills, and morgage.., etc. Look at newspapers, Tvs, no one mentions them much, as if  public servants are a different species!!!

 

 

 

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
40 Responses to
Anyone care about the public servants losing their jobs?
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
rigseismic67 8:41 am 15 Oct 15

Canberra Times

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/new-jobs-cull-at-department-of-defence-20150907-gjh7o1.html

“The criteria for offering a VR will be based on age, gender, disability, Indigenous background, job family, job criticality, location, and performance of the person in the last two years,”

does that mean if you have been a lazy so and so for the last 2 years you will get priority for a redundancy? bad luck to those who worked hard! Laziness rewarded.

JonnieWalker 4:07 pm 19 May 14

Johno said :

Earl said :

You know what’s worse than public servants? People who are so full of themselves they think they’re better than any pube just because they work in private industry / work for themselves. Fair enough to point out inefficiencies and ineffectiveness, but why the hatred for people who just happen to be employed by the government? Don’t understand it – and yes I have worked in private, public and for myself.

Bravo, this comment! I have worked for 43 years with public service officers (after a stint in the private sector and the Army) and I met a few lazy ones but I met thousands of dedicated people who just wanted to do a good job and go home to their families who loved them.

Johno said :

Earl said :

You know what’s worse than public servants? People who are so full of themselves they think they’re better than any pube just because they work in private industry / work for themselves. Fair enough to point out inefficiencies and ineffectiveness, but why the hatred for people who just happen to be employed by the government? Don’t understand it – and yes I have worked in private, public and for myself.

Bravo, this comment! I have worked for 43 years with public service officers (after a stint in the private sector and the Army) and I met a few lazy ones but I met thousands of dedicated people who just wanted to do a good job and go home to their families who loved them.

Don’t like the chances of any APS promotions in the next few years. You’d probably have to go back to the ADF for any real chance at promotion. But agree with you wholeheartedly – worked in private/public/military and there are a small portion of wasters anywhere. Some of my snooziest positions were in the private sector. Get in at 7 – do the laundry run, find a laundry basket full of towels to sleep in between 8-9 before getting breakfast and reading the paper.

davo101 3:55 pm 19 May 14

Earl said :

You know what’s worse than public servants? People who are so full of themselves they think they’re better than any pube just because they work in private industry / work for themselves.

‘Cause everyone knows that the private sector is an example of red-hot efficiency.

JonnieWalker 3:48 pm 19 May 14

While I feel for the APS guys who may loose out, I honestly think you could cut some of these departments by 50% in the right areas and they would function more efficiently. Many years ago, I recall DVA had a SES Band 1 heading up the regional accounts payable unit in QLD.

Cut back on the already thousands of IDCs and you would probably save 100s of FTE. As a general rule, it probably takes 5 times as long to approve a brief/report/policy than it does to research and write it. Less levels of management and governance would save a fortune.

Johno 3:28 pm 19 May 14

Earl said :

You know what’s worse than public servants? People who are so full of themselves they think they’re better than any pube just because they work in private industry / work for themselves. Fair enough to point out inefficiencies and ineffectiveness, but why the hatred for people who just happen to be employed by the government? Don’t understand it – and yes I have worked in private, public and for myself.

Bravo, this comment! I have worked for 43 years with public service officers (after a stint in the private sector and the Army) and I met a few lazy ones but I met thousands of dedicated people who just wanted to do a good job and go home to their families who loved them.

Johno 3:22 pm 19 May 14

How many people in Australia know exactly what our public service officers actually do? and do they know that we all have families and kids just like them. folks that don’t care are heartless and deserving of a double dose of meat from the Abbotoir! and they are public service officers not servants of anyone!

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 2:45 pm 19 May 14

dungfungus said :

BimboGeek said :

Sorry dungfungus, Poe strikes again! I was joking a bit but wanted to point out that there’s a bit of dischord between the two policies.

Obviously there are options, who knows a redundancy package may just pay off the mortgage leaving just enough savings to retire on.

No worries.
Actually, there are a lot of retirees paying off loans and spending the rest of their super on luxury items so they can go on the age pension for the rest of their miserable retirements. While it is legal it is still a rort and this may force the government to quarantine lump sum super payouts. This would take pressure off a lot of super funds who would be struggling to find liquidity in the event of an economic shock which could create a run on funds.

Unfortunately, this is true.

I don’t know how representative it is, but I know several people nearing retirement talking about major purchases with superannuation money for items that won’t be included in the pension assets test. Basically the plan is to set themselves up with everything they could possibly want/need so they can collect welfare.

And really, under the current rules, why wouldn’t they?

switch 1:24 pm 19 May 14

Pitchka said :

justsomeaussie said :

Felix the Cat said :

Every time I catch an EL1 spending all day worrying about font size and playing with MS PowerPoint I’m reminded that that person is a waste of time and of my tax money.

So how do you catch these public servants spending all day on powerpoint exactly?

S/he’s got nothing else to do.

Pitchka 1:07 pm 19 May 14

justsomeaussie said :

Felix the Cat said :

Every time I catch an EL1 spending all day worrying about font size and playing with MS PowerPoint I’m reminded that that person is a waste of time and of my tax money.

So how do you catch these public servants spending all day on powerpoint exactly?

dungfungus 11:39 am 19 May 14

BimboGeek said :

Sorry dungfungus, Poe strikes again! I was joking a bit but wanted to point out that there’s a bit of dischord between the two policies.

Obviously there are options, who knows a redundancy package may just pay off the mortgage leaving just enough savings to retire on.

No worries.
Actually, there are a lot of retirees paying off loans and spending the rest of their super on luxury items so they can go on the age pension for the rest of their miserable retirements. While it is legal it is still a rort and this may force the government to quarantine lump sum super payouts. This would take pressure off a lot of super funds who would be struggling to find liquidity in the event of an economic shock which could create a run on funds.

BimboGeek 11:01 am 19 May 14

Sorry dungfungus, Poe strikes again! I was joking a bit but wanted to point out that there’s a bit of dischord between the two policies.

Obviously there are options, who knows a redundancy package may just pay off the mortgage leaving just enough savings to retire on.

dungfungus 10:54 am 19 May 14

BimboGeek said :

The only problem with decreasing the age of your staff is that the old deadwood are supposed to work til they are 70 now.

That is totally incorrect and alarmist.
No one “has to work until they are 70” now, or even at anytime. The “being 70” refers to the age someone will have to reach to access the age pension. I think the 70 year old bracket is being phased in many years from now.
In any event, all people who are working now will have superannuation to retire on in 20 years time – so there should be no need for a taxpayer funded pension.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 10:09 am 19 May 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

milkman said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Hardly fair to those who are being told to go.

It’s a good opportunity to get rid of old, dead wood, and bring in some new ideas with a can-do attitude who cost a heap less.

Bingo! There’s the reason. Cost cutting by getting cheaper labor. If the government can do it, so can anyone. Whose it going to be next? Construction, manufacturing, retail, health services, law enforcement.

It’s a lot easier in business to identify dead wood, because costs and revenue can often be apportioned to staff efforts. It’s much harder to do this in government, though. The problem government also has is that those people who are either close to retirement, or able to find alternate employment are often the ones putting up their hands for the fabled VR package. Why not change jobs or retire early after a long career if it puts a couple of hundred thousand dollars (or more) into your wallet? Some people, especially the savers/investors, would be significantly closer to retirement should a VR be given.

BimboGeek 9:12 am 19 May 14

The only problem with decreasing the age of your staff is that the old deadwood are supposed to work til they are 70 now.

JimCharles 10:13 pm 18 May 14

Felix the Cat said :

Surely not all of these thousands of public positions can be surplus to requirements? The work will still need to be done by somebody, presumably by hiring some one as a consultant to do it (often the worker who has just been sacked/made redundant) so how does this save money?

By the time a redunduncy is paid and the process has been gone through to outsource this work and then the often inflated price is paid to the replacement consultant/company then it would actually work out much cheaper just to keep the original worker.

It depends what the original worker is achieving.
A friend of mine worked as a contractor and reckoned the only ones actually achieving anything were self-employed on contractor rates. They were also the only ones to be found working on a Friday afternoon. She also found the multitude of Directors incomprehensible and thought some were completely useless for fulfilling the organisational objectives. A Director directs, you only need one of them.
Also, a bit of churn is good for an organisation….it can open up opportunities for younger staff who want to do more but are being held up by people sitting static in higher positions who aren’t being held accountable for anything, nor do they feel they want to do anything differently.
Public sectors all over the world were experts at protecting themselves. Sometimes the only way to force change is to cut budgets to such a level so they cannot hide anymore, are forced to transform and then come out with better performance and more fulfilling jobs for people. It’s happened elsewhere, now it’s Australia’s turn.

…and she found ones with Director job titles the worst culprits (in fact, she said they direct nothing and are only worth ignoring).

wildturkeycanoe 9:58 pm 18 May 14

milkman said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

Hardly fair to those who are being told to go.

It’s a good opportunity to get rid of old, dead wood, and bring in some new ideas with a can-do attitude who cost a heap less.

Bingo! There’s the reason. Cost cutting by getting cheaper labor. If the government can do it, so can anyone. Whose it going to be next? Construction, manufacturing, retail, health services, law enforcement.

milkman 8:00 pm 18 May 14

wildturkeycanoe said :

Hardly fair to those who are being told to go.

It’s a good opportunity to get rid of old, dead wood, and bring in some new ideas with a can-do attitude who cost a heap less.

justsomeaussie 4:59 pm 18 May 14

Felix the Cat said :

Surely not all of these thousands of public positions can be surplus to requirements? The work will still need to be done by somebody, presumably by hiring some one as a consultant to do it (often the worker who has just been sacked/made redundant) so how does this save money?

A lot of the time once things like HR, training courses, annual leave, sick leave are factored in it can still be cheaper to hire a contractor on 1.5-2 times the the salaried position salary. Plus you can sack problem contractors on the spot, which unsurprisingly you can’t do to a public servant.

If you look at days sick for example contractors are at the very low end of the sample, public servants fall the highest and everyone else in the middle.

Contractors can be very useful in set project work with a defined budget and defined timeframe.

Largely my issue with my experience with and around the public service is that for the most part most departments have done away with clerical type roles on clerical type salaries only to have APS6-EL1 people doing well below their knowledge level.

Only too often reports sent to higher with the only red pen coming back being stylistic changes rather than any actual content knowledge.

Every time I catch an EL1 spending all day worrying about font size and playing with MS PowerPoint I’m reminded that that person is a waste of time and of my tax money.

wildturkeycanoe 2:09 pm 18 May 14

If jobs from the government are going, for example up to 400 from PM & C, http://www.smh.com.au/national/public-service/up-to-400-jobs-to-go-at-prime-minister-and-cabinet-department-20140516-zrf7q.html , why are PM & C advertising for graduates to apply for jobs there, as I saw on a job site today? Get rid of the old dead timber and plant new seedlings? Hardly fair to those who are being told to go.

Felix the Cat 8:41 am 18 May 14

Surely not all of these thousands of public positions can be surplus to requirements? The work will still need to be done by somebody, presumably by hiring some one as a consultant to do it (often the worker who has just been sacked/made redundant) so how does this save money?

By the time a redunduncy is paid and the process has been gone through to outsource this work and then the often inflated price is paid to the replacement consultant/company then it would actually work out much cheaper just to keep the original worker.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Region Group Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site