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Baby boomers go to Bateman’s bay – let the younguns run this town!

By stirred408 4 November 2008 75

I heard somewhere that 50% of the ACT’s population is over 50.  

Can that be right?  

Is this town going to turn into a waiting room for the graveyard?

I think half the problem with this place is that the older generation that moved here in the 70’s do not want to see the place change.  

They are opposed to everything new.

The Commonwealth and ACT public service are filled with these bludgers.  

Do we have to wait 30 years for them to disappear before this town can grow?  

Discuss…. 

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75 Responses to
Baby boomers go to Bateman’s bay – let the younguns run this town!
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Granny 1:31 pm 06 Nov 08

Yep!

*hehehehe*

rosebud 1:17 pm 06 Nov 08

tee hee hee :). Here’s a link to the Teenage song if you haven’t seen it yet. Pure Gen x or y er – I can’t tell as the ‘tude seems pretty ubiquitous regardless of the decade:

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=gKaUL2mtAqA

Granny 1:14 pm 06 Nov 08

Yep. We’re old alright. And one day we’ll be dead. And you’ll be old. Yep. You’ll be old alright.

poptop 1:11 pm 06 Nov 08

As you read Nancy Mitford, I shall forgive your hurtful words, rosebud. 🙂

rosebud 1:06 pm 06 Nov 08

REAL Gen Xers don’t feel compelled to delineate ‘the cusp’. It’s not astrology. Only those oldies who think they are still young and are embarrassed when someone stands on the bus so that they can sit down, worry about when one market segment stops and the other starts. Read ‘Love in a Cold Climate’ (Nancy Mitford) to see that even in the 1930s, the old people thought themselves young, while the truly young KNEW that the oldies were, indeed, old, with old values, old hair, and old money.

Granny 12:17 pm 06 Nov 08

Yes, although I am strangely and weirdly drawn to the music of the 50s and 60s.

thetruth 12:10 pm 06 Nov 08

poptop said :

I am also a child of the 60s, have a HECS debt, buy my stuff from the Salvos, etc, etc, etc.

The issues about the age group defined as Baby Boomers in Australia is that, as a group, we are – the holders of stupendous wealth, the greatest consumers the World has ever seen, inclined to believe we will live forever, disinclined to relax into the stuff we expect our parents to do [like going off quietly to the nursing home], The most highly educated generation ever, etc., etc.

This is generalising and we can all point to bits that don’t apply to us; very few baby boomers could tick all the boxes.

The big policy wonks believe that the Baby Boomer generation represents a sort of peak – Generations after us will have to exercise restraint that we didn’t have to, are less likely to have the standard of living we had, are less likely to obtain tertiary quals, are less likely to own their own home.

While I genuinely like quite a lot of the younger people I know and am friends with, I am quietly pleased I managed to get through my horny adolescence during that small window that included contraception but excluded AIDS, went to work knowing I could change jobs as I wanted, was able to fly around the world without worrying about terrorism or carbon credits.

Sadly we may have indeed lived through the best of times.

If you are born in the 60’s chances are that you are a GenX (if early 60’s you are on the cusp)- but I don’t subscribe to the academic categorisation – me father for example was born in 1943 (technically he is not a boomer, but he has alway identified with and experienced the life and issues of the boomer generation.

Your expeience is more akin to mine (born 1968)there is always debate on the fringes about the cut off – but I would suggest that an early 60s child would more identify with coming of age in the 70’s to 80’s cohort than the 50’s 60’s love peace generation (most identifable babyboom group).

poptop 10:17 am 06 Nov 08

I am also a child of the 60s, have a HECS debt, buy my stuff from the Salvos, etc, etc, etc.

The issues about the age group defined as Baby Boomers in Australia is that, as a group, we are – the holders of stupendous wealth, the greatest consumers the World has ever seen, inclined to believe we will live forever, disinclined to relax into the stuff we expect our parents to do [like going off quietly to the nursing home], The most highly educated generation ever, etc., etc.

This is generalising and we can all point to bits that don’t apply to us; very few baby boomers could tick all the boxes.

The big policy wonks believe that the Baby Boomer generation represents a sort of peak – Generations after us will have to exercise restraint that we didn’t have to, are less likely to have the standard of living we had, are less likely to obtain tertiary quals, are less likely to own their own home.

While I genuinely like quite a lot of the younger people I know and am friends with, I am quietly pleased I managed to get through my horny adolescence during that small window that included contraception but excluded AIDS, went to work knowing I could change jobs as I wanted, was able to fly around the world without worrying about terrorism or carbon credits.

Sadly we may have indeed lived through the best of times.

GB 9:28 am 06 Nov 08

“Baby Boomer” isn’t defined by

miz said :

” own heaps of stuff”

You are a “baby boomer” if … wait for it … you were born during the baby boom. Eg wikipedia “Baby boomer is a term used to describe a person who was born during the Post-World War II baby boom between 1946 and 1964.[1][2] Following World War II, several English-speaking countries – the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand – experienced an unusual spike in birth rates, a phenomenon commonly referred to as the baby boom.”

Whether this cohort of people have anything in common other than their age is hugely debatable. And using “baby boomers” as a sort of catch-all insult for “parents” is just lazy. As is using X or Y as a catch-all insult for younger people you don’t like.

So, is there actually anything useful to say about whether people over 50 “don’t want anything to change”, or that this is The Problem With Canberra?

I love discussions that start with “I heard somewhere that” [insert wrong data here].

Granny 9:27 am 06 Nov 08

No technically we probably are Baby Boomers, poptop. It is just hard for us because we really do identify with Gen X.

poptop 9:10 am 06 Nov 08

The Baby Boomer timeframe for the US wasn’t set by me and I did specifically note it is for the US. I don’t recall making generalisations based on the generational tag, but was pointing out that The Truth was doing so and erroneously.

Those exit polls linked also show that white people, particularly men, vote Republican. Ditto the higher the education level attained the more likely the person is to vote Republican. Let’s not allow our prejudices to assume a single cause.

It is intellectually lazy to claim a moral high ground on foreign data and then dispute the bits you don’t like.

thetruth 1:09 am 06 Nov 08

poptop said :

And your evidence for this bizarre claim would be what?

The only way to get a reasonable estimate of the voting patterns the exit polls that showed that once you hit 45 and older you tended toward McCain

see http://edition.cnn.com/ELECTION/2008/results/president/

Granny 9:35 pm 05 Nov 08

The whole “generation” thing is so arbitrary and stupid anyway. As a baby born in the early sixties, what on earth am I supposed to have in common with my parents born in the thirties? Yet we are all supposedly “baby boomers” ….

I don’t think so!

More of my friends are from my daughters’ generation in any case, quite accidentally as it happens.

miz 7:08 pm 05 Nov 08

Poptop, I am a ’62 baby and I’m definitely gen x, not boomer – ie I don’t own heaps of stuff like boomers are supposed to, AND I am paying HECS! I suspect the so called boomer timeframe is too wide to make accurate generalisations.

rosebud 6:13 pm 05 Nov 08

I thought Baby Boomer meant people born from parents who had lived thru ‘the war’ – ie not the Second World War generation, but the one after it.

Gen X and Gen Y have had their day now too.

I’m looking forward to using the new market jargon for the next gen: the Millenials! Truly a sci fi ring to that! M

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