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How (not) to share the road

By Publicserpent 16 August 2013 70

If the middle-aged brunette driver of the Nissan X-Trail (YDY 34C) that felt the need to blast their horn at me – while traveling through the roundabout between McCaughey and Masson Streets – would like to explain what point you were trying to make, I’d be much obliged.

Another shining example of tolerance on Canberra’s roads!

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How (not) to share the road
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Jim Jones 9:20 am 28 Aug 13

CraigT said :

rigseismic67 said :

Being a road user you are meant to be tolerant of other road users, something you are obviously not. Regardless of her horn you should learn to share the road
You don’t own the road, only share it with the rest of us.

But being a cyclist means he delights in obstructing other people and holding them up.

So ‘sharing the roads’ = get out of my way I’m a motorist.

:golfclap:

CraigT 6:34 am 28 Aug 13

rigseismic67 said :

Being a road user you are meant to be tolerant of other road users, something you are obviously not. Regardless of her horn you should learn to share the road
You don’t own the road, only share it with the rest of us.

But being a cyclist means he delights in obstructing other people and holding them up.

Aeek 12:28 am 28 Aug 13

As an example of sharing, MacArthur Avenue is 2 lanes but often light traffic. When I notice the only vehicle behind me is signalling left I LOVE to shift to the right lane. It’s pure win win.

Aeek 11:58 pm 27 Aug 13

rigseismic67 said :

Being a road user you are meant to be tolerant of other road users, something you are obviously not. Regardless of her horn you should learn to share the road
You don’t own the road, only share it with the rest of us.

As a cyclist, I’m all about sharing the road. I just don’t get how being attacked with a horn or threatened with over 1 tonne of metal is sharing.

rigseismic67 9:40 pm 27 Aug 13

Being a road user you are meant to be tolerant of other road users, something you are obviously not. Regardless of her horn you should learn to share the road
You don’t own the road, only share it with the rest of us.

thebrownstreak69 10:39 am 19 Aug 13

One thing I find interesting about threads like this is the impression that problems are widespread. I’ve walked, ridden and driven around Canberra for a couple of decades now, and never had any problem more serious than having to brake suddenly a few times (both bike and car) because someone did something silly, and that was the end of it. I’ve never once had a problem with either bikes or cars while I was a pedestrian. All in all, I’d say that was a pretty good outcome.

Holden Caulfield 10:12 am 19 Aug 13

davecdp said :

I don’t understand why bike riders don’t use the paths? Its safer and more relaxing that trying to fit in with cars especially on these smaller streets. If this roundabout is where I think it is, i’m pretty sure there is one of the good larger bitumen bike paths on this route. If it makes your commute quicker to use the road your being a bit of a hypocrite because most of you are telling the cars they should slow down and don’t rush their commute…..

As a general rule I would agree with you. However, in this instance the cycle path you’re thinking of runs perpendicular to the route the OP is taking.

Postalgeek 9:54 am 19 Aug 13

Weatherman said :

The cyclist was riding on the road, when there is a footpath nearby and it is also legal in the ACT to cycle on footpaths. The lane width on many roads were not designed for accommodating both a bike and a car, whilst there is oncoming traffic. That’s the actual situation, despite all the hoopla about how we should be sharing roads.

The Dutch solution to have cycle paths segregated is the most logical solution. No risk of collision.

I’ll get my quoting right this time :-/

Yes, segregated cycle paths would be the ideal solutions.

There are several problems with paths that lead to cyclists using parallel roads.

A major one is right-of-way. A footpath running parallel to a trunk road will be dissected by all side roads, and a cyclist will have to give way at every cross-over point, expending far more energy accelerating each time than they would if they cycled on the trunk road, where they would have right-of-way. No motorist would use a parallel side road with give ways at every single intersection if they had the option to use the trunk road, and they are expending far less energy than cyclists.

Cyclists leaving paths to crossing road are also very vulnerable to turning traffic, especially coming from behind. Head checks for cyclists are much trickier than for drivers as they can affect balance and line much more, and motorists, while they are expected to be situationally aware, are generally looking for other cars on the road. Being on the road in bright colours puts you in a more prominent position to negotiate these intersections, in theory.

Then there are the driveways and lane ways that dissect paths, and the myriad hedges, walls, and fences that conceal cyclists and reversing vehicles from one another. Not to mention all the obstructions in the form of overgrowth and vehicles parked across footpaths.

The pedestrian traffic on footpaths is anarchic and follows no hard and fast rules. At least cars have a set of rules that makes their actions more predictable, again in theory.

Paths also might also take rambling lines, diverge away, or there are limited access points, or the cyclist intends to turn right, or other indirections.

And then there’s path quality, which doesn’t matter much on some bikes, like MTBs, but can make it very unpleasant for someone riding on slimline road tyres running at 110+ psi.

Cyclists don’t want to mix with cars anymore than cars want to mix with cyclists, but until everyone gets what they want, the mixing will continue.

jase! 9:49 am 19 Aug 13

magiccar9 said :

Why is it always up to drivers to make the compromise?
Why can’t the cyclist be considerate and stay as close to the left as possible (or better yet use the paths build for them)?

Is it really that bad for everyone to make an effort? No, it’s common sense. So just use it.

I will ride as far over to the left as is safe, I’m not going to ride in the gutter just because it is possible, I’m not going to ride in an area where I can be hit by opening doors just to “keep as far left as possible”. If the bike paths go where I need to go I am happy to use them. If the video above is a car driver ‘making an effort’ then it is probably better if they didn’t

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