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Like Canberra pledges free car rego for 17- to 25-year-olds

By Chester Ward - 21 September 2016 23

Shelley Dickerson and Tim Friel of the Like Canberra party at the Dickson Motor Registry. Photo: Charlotte Harper

The Like Canberra Party has today committed if elected to granting all 17 to 25-year-olds free registration for the first car they own.

Members of the party gathered outside the Dickson Motor Registry this morning to announce their newest campaign promise, which would cover the cost for young drivers of the government registration charge but not the insurance component of the total registration cost.

In a clear attempt to attract young voters, the Like Canberra team argued that reducing the cost of registration would help Canberrans who work in casual and part-time jobs with irregular hours, making the use of public transport difficult.

If the registration fee were eliminated for first time car-owners, it would reduce the overall registration cost for them by several hundred dollars. The exact amount charged is calculated on vehicle weight, and therefore varies on a case by case basis.

Shelley Dickerson, one of the Like Canberra party’s two candidates for the Woden-Weston Creek seat of Murrumbidgee, argues that young people need a car to live their lives because the current public transport in Canberra is insufficient to meet their needs.

“Our public transport is really not working, it’s really poor,” she says.

“Young people have lives they have to sustain, and their jobs are the ones that need them at the drop of a hat.”

Fellow Like Canberra candidate Tim Friel, who is running in the Tuggerangong seat of Brindabella, believes that his party’s proposed registration fee reduction is necessary to help young people get around, while other, better means of public transport are developed.

“This is an opportunity to help young people from day one of the next parliament,” Mr Friel says.

“After that we can investigate light rail, we can investigate a better bus system.”

The Like Canberra Party’s other policies include: the introduction of an independent corruption commissioner, the legalisation of same sex marriage and funding for a $500,000 international science, technology and arts Canberra prize.

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Like Canberra pledges free car rego for 17- to 25-year-olds
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madelini 9:54 am 28 Sep 16

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

I think it’s a great idea (and am wondering how much of the opposition is borne out of jealousy). Given that young people are the group most likely to be underemployed and/or balancing study commitments, this would be a great help. Keeping in mind that they have restricted it to first-time car owners, it’s not as though many will be able to rort the system. Even if restricted to the first year of car ownership this would be a great assistance, rather than having to fork out ~$900 on top of the cost of the car and insurance (especially if you earn too little to qualify for a loan). It definitely would have been of great help for me – when I was younger I lived in outer suburban Tuggeranong, worked in Red Hill and studied in the City. I begged lifts so that I wouldn’t have to spend nearly 90 minutes in commute, because I couldn’t afford to buy a car of my own. I was lucky in that I had stopped working weekends – that was a nightmare, requiring two busses and an hour-long trip to get to Woden, let alone anywhere else. The busses are not practical for many people living in the suburbs, particularly towards the outskirts of Tuggeranong and Belconnen.

Young people are often overlooked by the major parties. This is for a number of good reasons – mainly, that families probably deserve more attention as their needs tend to be greater. That said, I appreciate that one of the smaller parties is recognising that in the post-GFC world, and in car-centric Canberra, the young would appreciate a boost.

If someone can’t afford the rego, perhaps they should consider not having a car. What about parents running children all over the place, then going to work (Little spending money because they have a mortgage); people, who struggle to walk to the bus, but can still drive. What makes the youngest and the fittest so unique? Most of whom would be capable of walking, dare I say running for a bus, or cycling. Instead of catching the local bus, cycle to where the express bus runs and shorten the commute. If the excuse is, but I don’t like cycling or walking, that is not a reason to be subsidised by other people, some who would be as badly off money wise, or having a lot to balance in their day too.

For many people, including the young, having a car is a necessity, not a choice. The busses are not practical for everyone, depending on the times they work and where they live. Many people don’t live remotely close to an express route. I certainly don’t; Tuggeranong is a big place, and one of the more affordable spots if you don’t have much earning power. As I said earlier, young people are more likely to be underemployed and/or studying – while university and CIT operate during standard hours, if you are supplementing your income by working in one of the bars or clubs, or even McDonalds, good luck getting a bus at 2am. Or if you are a young person who doesn’t feel safe waiting around for a bus at night in Woden or Tuggeranong interchange, because we all know they’re not the nicest of places. Saying that young people are fitter doesn’t mean that this policy doesn’t have value. It is one policy, from one party, targeting the youth because no other party does that. As far as a play goes, I’m sold.

As to your examples, Australian families with children receive many more benefits, services and tax breaks on a local and federal level than the youth do. Having children is a choice, more than being a young person is. People with disabilities get certain allowances – particularly if they have a permit. They are entitled to that, and this policy does not revoke the rights they already have. I very clearly stated that the youth are often overlooked and for good reason, but that doesn’t mean that they cannot appreciate a policy designed to specifically benefit them.

It’s very easy to live in the inner south and say that transport is convenient for everyone, and the youth should just suck it up. If this policy makes life a little bit easier for someone who was like me, a couple of years ago, and will appreciate the small boost, then I am all for it.

What, more than ten kms from an express bus route? Ten kms is easily cycled. I would think many people would be closer. To choose not to cycle, for the able bodies, is a choice, but one shouldn’t expect free car rego just because you choose not to.
Yes, having children is definitely a choice; I agree with you there, but then so too is much of one’s other choices.

You misunderstand both me and the article above. There is no sense of entitlement; I have not heard of anyone requesting free rego. It has been suggested by one party as a policy that they would implement, in the same way that free bus travel for school children was put forward in the 1990s. For all your talk of the able-bodied youth who don’t know how good they’ve got it, I don’t buy it, and I am more in favour of a policy that will benefit youth across the city than I am for a tram or the Liberals’ Gungahlin to City “rejuvenation”. If you don’t like the policy, then don’t vote for Like Canberra. It’s that simple.

Bonkers 11:30 pm 23 Sep 16

This is quite possibly the stupidest idea I’ve heard yet in the run up to the election.

Given the age, I’m not sure if this is a Gen Y or Z issue, but in any case – you want a car? Then own a car and take responsibility for all the costs associated with owning one. If not, then don’t buy one and either PT or bike to work.

That said…

If Like Canberra pledges free car rego for 35-50 YO instead, you may have my vote. 🙂

Maya123 1:43 pm 23 Sep 16

madelini said :

Maya123 said :

madelini said :

I think it’s a great idea (and am wondering how much of the opposition is borne out of jealousy). Given that young people are the group most likely to be underemployed and/or balancing study commitments, this would be a great help. Keeping in mind that they have restricted it to first-time car owners, it’s not as though many will be able to rort the system. Even if restricted to the first year of car ownership this would be a great assistance, rather than having to fork out ~$900 on top of the cost of the car and insurance (especially if you earn too little to qualify for a loan). It definitely would have been of great help for me – when I was younger I lived in outer suburban Tuggeranong, worked in Red Hill and studied in the City. I begged lifts so that I wouldn’t have to spend nearly 90 minutes in commute, because I couldn’t afford to buy a car of my own. I was lucky in that I had stopped working weekends – that was a nightmare, requiring two busses and an hour-long trip to get to Woden, let alone anywhere else. The busses are not practical for many people living in the suburbs, particularly towards the outskirts of Tuggeranong and Belconnen.

Young people are often overlooked by the major parties. This is for a number of good reasons – mainly, that families probably deserve more attention as their needs tend to be greater. That said, I appreciate that one of the smaller parties is recognising that in the post-GFC world, and in car-centric Canberra, the young would appreciate a boost.

If someone can’t afford the rego, perhaps they should consider not having a car. What about parents running children all over the place, then going to work (Little spending money because they have a mortgage); people, who struggle to walk to the bus, but can still drive. What makes the youngest and the fittest so unique? Most of whom would be capable of walking, dare I say running for a bus, or cycling. Instead of catching the local bus, cycle to where the express bus runs and shorten the commute. If the excuse is, but I don’t like cycling or walking, that is not a reason to be subsidised by other people, some who would be as badly off money wise, or having a lot to balance in their day too.

For many people, including the young, having a car is a necessity, not a choice. The busses are not practical for everyone, depending on the times they work and where they live. Many people don’t live remotely close to an express route. I certainly don’t; Tuggeranong is a big place, and one of the more affordable spots if you don’t have much earning power. As I said earlier, young people are more likely to be underemployed and/or studying – while university and CIT operate during standard hours, if you are supplementing your income by working in one of the bars or clubs, or even McDonalds, good luck getting a bus at 2am. Or if you are a young person who doesn’t feel safe waiting around for a bus at night in Woden or Tuggeranong interchange, because we all know they’re not the nicest of places. Saying that young people are fitter doesn’t mean that this policy doesn’t have value. It is one policy, from one party, targeting the youth because no other party does that. As far as a play goes, I’m sold.

As to your examples, Australian families with children receive many more benefits, services and tax breaks on a local and federal level than the youth do. Having children is a choice, more than being a young person is. People with disabilities get certain allowances – particularly if they have a permit. They are entitled to that, and this policy does not revoke the rights they already have. I very clearly stated that the youth are often overlooked and for good reason, but that doesn’t mean that they cannot appreciate a policy designed to specifically benefit them.

It’s very easy to live in the inner south and say that transport is convenient for everyone, and the youth should just suck it up. If this policy makes life a little bit easier for someone who was like me, a couple of years ago, and will appreciate the small boost, then I am all for it.

What, more than ten kms from an express bus route? Ten kms is easily cycled. I would think many people would be closer. To choose not to cycle, for the able bodies, is a choice, but one shouldn’t expect free car rego just because you choose not to.
Yes, having children is definitely a choice; I agree with you there, but then so too is much of one’s other choices.

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