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More ceremony for the temple of the death cult

By johnboy 17 April 2013 92

war memorial

The ABC reports on ever more elaborate rites being laid on at the War Memorial.

Speaking as someone who used to go to the dawn service back when it fitted inside the memorial* I’m increasingly disturbed by the trend this is part of.

The national anthem will be played, the public will be able to lay wreaths and a uniformed member of the defence force will read a short account of the life of one of the people on the memorial’s Roll of Honour.

The daily ceremony will end with the playing of the last post and it will also be streamed on the internet.

The Memorial’s director Brendan Nelson says he felt a more meaningful closing ceremony was needed.

It started under the Howard Government, the ever increasing fetishism of Anzac as the last veterans who could have told them off finally disappeared.

Conservatives have always liked the authoritarian nature of Christianity, but it’s imperfect for them.

That hippy preaching love, forgiveness and running the bankers out of the temple? Troubling.

Whereas a militaristic death cult immortalising the sacrifice of the young for the maintenance of the old men’s position of power?

Wrap it in a flag, play the last post, and bow your head as you walk past their name etched in bronze?

That’s more like it isn’t it?

* The author comes from multi-generational service family and is all in favour of remembering the fallen. But all things should be in moderation.


UPDATE: The memorial’s media release is available in full.

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More ceremony for the temple of the death cult
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Tooks 10:59 am 26 Apr 13

Jim Jones said :

Roundhead89 said :

According to Alan Jones on 2GB money

You really should start your post with that phrase, so that nobody wastes any time reading the rest of your post.

How anyone can listen to that grotty fat little bigot is beyond my understanding.

Jim Jones 8:42 am 26 Apr 13

Roundhead89 said :

According to Alan Jones on 2GB money

You really should start your post with that phrase, so that nobody wastes any time reading the rest of your post.

IrishPete 4:28 am 26 Apr 13

Tetranitrate said :

[
The UK on the other hand directly denied the poor the right to vote through property qualifications, denying the bottom 40% of men the vote entirely. That ended in 1918 of course – telling millions of traumatized war veterans that they had no right to have a say in how they were governed would likely not have ended well.

indeed, especially after the example of Russia in 1917…

IP

Tetranitrate 5:57 pm 25 Apr 13

IrishPete said :

And it’s never been clear to me whether the Germans in WW1 were any “worse” than the British – move to WW2 and you are on much safer ground. Perhaps Britain was a democracy in 1914 when Germany wasn’t, but most of Britain’s remaining colonies weren’t democracies.

IP

Britain and Germany were both ‘flawed’ democracies at the time –
The German Empire had universal male suffrage, but entrenched mal-apportionment at the state level (the largest ‘state’, the kingdom of Prussia, about 2/3rds of the country had a 3 class franchise, where the rich, poor and middle class each were allocated a 3rd of the seats – more or less at least)

The UK on the other hand directly denied the poor the right to vote through property qualifications, denying the bottom 40% of men the vote entirely. That ended in 1918 of course – telling millions of traumatized war veterans that they had no right to have a say in how they were governed would likely not have ended well.

The claim that WW1 was over freedom and democracy is on the face of it absurd though given that we were on the same side as Tsarist Russia, the most autocratic state of any note on the planet at the time.

Roundhead89 5:22 pm 25 Apr 13

JimCharles said :

IrishPete said :

Where I come from (UK) Remembrance Day is also a big deal for soldiers who lost their lives in Northern Ireland, which makes it incredibly political in that little corner of the UK. I don’t think it is yet commemorating Northern Ireland’s civilian dead (no matter who killed them) nor terrorist dead.

It’s interesting that Remembrance Day in the UK is suffering from the same accusations of excessive commercialisation and “poppy fascism”, to the point where people feel obliged to wear them weeks before the actual day and there’s blanket poppy wearing for weeks across all TV channels, news, sports managers, public officials, sewn into sports shirts and flags.
This is fine, but those who choose NOT to wear a poppy are being increasingly vilified, normally Irish people who might have very good reasons not to commemorate soldiers they saw as deadly enemies.
The irony is, they’re just exercising the right to independent choice and freedom of expression that soldiers fought for. Trying to push and organise everyone to remember the same thing in the same way is exactly what most WWII soldiers fought against.

I think it is time for the hype to be taken out of Anzac Day commemorations. It has just become too overblown in the media and maybe it is time to scale it back to the way it was in the 1970s and ’80s – dignified, level-headed and not ostentatious.

According to Alan Jones on 2GB money is being spent and preparations are being made to spread the centenary of Anzac commemorations over four years – 2014 to 2018! If this is true it will be going completely over the top and risks Australians suffering Digger fatigue.

IrishPete 2:52 pm 25 Apr 13

LSWCHP said :

IrishPete said :

And it’s never been clear to me whether the Germans in WW1 were any “worse” than the British – move to WW2 and you are on much safer ground. Perhaps Britain was a democracy in 1914 when Germany wasn’t, but most of Britain’s remaining colonies weren’t democracies.

I think you should read a little more history. History is written by the victors of course, but I’m pretty firmly convinced that things would not have turned out well in the long run if the Kaiser and his crew had achieved the quick victory they desired. As it was, things turned out pretty poorly for almost everybody in the short run, but it wasn’t Britain who invaded Germany to kick it all off.

Quick victory over who? WW1 did not start when Germany invaded Britain (it never did of course, the land war not being fought on any British soil and Britain entered the war later than most other protaganists). Nor even when it invaded France (or more correctly, Belgium). It started when the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia as a consequence of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. How and why everyone else entered the war isn’t entirely clear to me, but as one outcome of WW1 was the rise of Russia and then the Soviet Union, and of course Hitler’s Germany, I doubt there are any positives. The world may have been a better or worse place if WW1 had not taken place, or if it had ended differently. We will never know.

IP

LSWCHP 12:30 pm 25 Apr 13

My boys and I went to the dawn service this morning and I thought it was good.

We got there about 4:50 while the readings were taking place. They were sometimes very moving, particularly one from a digger who had written a letter to his partner to be delivered if he was KIA, which he sadly was.

The images projected on the walls of the AWM were unobtrusive.

About 5:20 it all stopped and the lights went out. We had ten quiet minutes in the dark, and then the traditional dawn service took place as usual.

I was concerned that it might have been distasteful and cheesy, but I thought it was quiet, low-key and dignified.

LSWCHP 12:21 pm 25 Apr 13

IrishPete said :

And it’s never been clear to me whether the Germans in WW1 were any “worse” than the British – move to WW2 and you are on much safer ground. Perhaps Britain was a democracy in 1914 when Germany wasn’t, but most of Britain’s remaining colonies weren’t democracies.

I think you should read a little more history. History is written by the victors of course, but I’m pretty firmly convinced that things would not have turned out well in the long run if the Kaiser and his crew had achieved the quick victory they desired. As it was, things turned out pretty poorly for almost everybody in the short run, but it wasn’t Britain who invaded Germany to kick it all off.

IrishPete 1:17 pm 22 Apr 13

Masquara said :

JimCharles said :

… normally Irish people who might have very good reasons not to commemorate soldiers they saw as deadly enemies.

Would that be folks who relate to the tiny minority of Irish people who supported the German-Irish collaboration during WWI, as opposed to the vast majority who supported participation?

Can you provide a source for the “tiny minority” “vast majority” claim? In 1916 Irish republicans/nationalists took the opportunity of a distracted and weakened Britain to try to gain their independence. They probably had the support of the majority of the population, but failed for a variety of reasons including, perhaps, a lesser level of support for their timing than for their aims.

You can criticise them for their timing, but given they won partial independence 5 years later, it would be hard to criticise their motives.

And it’s never been clear to me whether the Germans in WW1 were any “worse” than the British – move to WW2 and you are on much safer ground. Perhaps Britain was a democracy in 1914 when Germany wasn’t, but most of Britain’s remaining colonies weren’t democracies.

IP

Masquara 9:15 pm 21 Apr 13

JimCharles said :

… normally Irish people who might have very good reasons not to commemorate soldiers they saw as deadly enemies.

Would that be folks who relate to the tiny minority of Irish people who supported the German-Irish collaboration during WWI, as opposed to the vast majority who supported participation?

JimCharles 7:32 pm 21 Apr 13

IrishPete said :

Where I come from (UK) Remembrance Day is also a big deal for soldiers who lost their lives in Northern Ireland, which makes it incredibly political in that little corner of the UK. I don’t think it is yet commemorating Northern Ireland’s civilian dead (no matter who killed them) nor terrorist dead.

It’s interesting that Remembrance Day in the UK is suffering from the same accusations of excessive commercialisation and “poppy fascism”, to the point where people feel obliged to wear them weeks before the actual day and there’s blanket poppy wearing for weeks across all TV channels, news, sports managers, public officials, sewn into sports shirts and flags.
This is fine, but those who choose NOT to wear a poppy are being increasingly vilified, normally Irish people who might have very good reasons not to commemorate soldiers they saw as deadly enemies.
The irony is, they’re just exercising the right to independent choice and freedom of expression that soldiers fought for. Trying to push and organise everyone to remember the same thing in the same way is exactly what most WWII soldiers fought against.

5

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