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Screaming out for Independence in Braddon

By Alexandra Craig - 22 July 2014 57

supermarket

Braddon is pumping. It’s pretty much your one stop shop. You can indulge in a delicious breakfast at Elk and Pea, get a killer haircut at AXIS, stop for a cold pressed juice and some scrumptious bread at Autolyse and then grab some groceries from the IGA on your way home. One problem: there is no IGA in Braddon!

If you live in Braddon, chances are you’re not happy that we don’t have a supermarket. I am one of those people.

Braddon has three liquor stores (four if you count the brand spankin’ new Bentspoke Brewery), a plethora of cafes and restaurants, some quirky homewares stores, an Officeworks and even an optometrist! You can buy a used car in Braddon and even get it washed on the way home but you can’t buy toilet paper or a box of Dilmah tea.

‘Don’t be so lazy, just walk to the Canberra Centre and go to Supabarn!,’ I hear you scream. I get this. Kind of. I often walk to Supabarn instead of driving (really, who wants to pay $73 to park at the Canberra Centre for eight minutes?) but if I’m hanging out on Lonsdale Street and I want to grab a few groceries on my way home, I don’t want to walk nearly a kilometre in the opposite direction. No one does. The Canberra Centre is the absolute pits, and on an icy cold day the last thing I want to do is walk a longer distance to get my hands on some decent groceries. Besides, if you’re walking back to Braddon with shopping bags your arms are going to get sore very quickly.

If you don’t want to walk to the Canberra Centre, your next option is to drive (or bike) to the IGA at either Ainslie or O’Connor, or make the trek to Dickson Woolworths which is it’s own special kind of hell.

I want quick. I want easy. I want convenience. Don’t try and tell me to go to one of Braddon’s four petrol stations. Convenience does not equal overpriced random branded ‘groceries’ from the 7-11 or the BP. The options available at petrol stations just don’t cut it.

Other IGAs in Canberra stock a decent variety of brands, including the delicious Lindsay and Edmunds chocolate – bonus points for stocking handmade chocolate entirely produced in Canberra! The only chocolate you’ll get at a petrol station is a squished Mars Bar or a semi intact Caramello Koala if you’re lucky.

Braddon is where it’s at. We have everything here and most of us are really cool. We desperately need an IGA though. Our O’Connor and Ainslie neighbours have had their own IGA for ages and we can’t deal with their bragging any longer.

What’s Your opinion?


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Screaming out for Independence in Braddon
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crackerpants 8:46 am 29 Jul 14

For various boring, non-hip reasons I get my groceries delivered from one half of the evil duopoly, via the internets. It’s terribly uncool, but this could be countered if conducted via iPad and free wifi at the cold-pressed juice bar.

I did once score an iceberg lettuce at my local shops, but realistically it’s 2.8k to the nearest supermarket. It’s a lovely walk to load up the pram baskets with fruit and veg, but not doable when I have the older kids with me…but long story short, we chose to live in the Creek with its single petrol station for 10 suburbs, and we stand by our decision 🙂

Alexandra Craig 4:03 pm 28 Jul 14

Postalgeek said :

You moved to Braddon to be close to Civic, and all that entails.

No, I didn’t. I moved to Braddon because I found a house that I liked there. Civic being close played zero part in my decision. But thanks for the tip.

Masquara said :

Postalgeek said :

Yeah, I guess a “human brochure” might be prone to spruiking any message that pays. That’s the conundrum of the new media environment – none of these PR people have a hope of developing any form of trust in their audience. Treasure traditional journos while you still can!

Nothing to do with the Human Brochure. Being part of the Brochure isn’t something that I’m paid for. Even if it was, the Brochure is about bringing new visitors to Canberra – not about getting an IGA for Braddon.

Also, I haven’t even mentioned the Brochure on RiotACT. You obviously took the time to look at what I’ve been posting on social media – nawwwwwwww, aren’t you just so sweet?!

Postalgeek said :

PS You should only ever think you’re ‘really cool’. If you say it, it doesn’t come true.

Awww, I’m sorry that’s been your experience. How unfortunate for you.

Watson said :

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

No way. Otherwise I would have just moved to Casey.

Masquara said :

If having a cheap supermarket within a couple of minutes walk of where you live is your top priority – why on earth did you move to Braddon?

It’s not my top priority. It would just be nice to have one. And once more, IGAs are NOT CHEAP. They are usually more expensive than Coles/Woolworths etc – you’re paying extra for the convenience or because you believe in supporting independent retailers instead of big business.

jgsma 6:53 pm 27 Jul 14

Back in the olden days when I was a child, the milkman and the bread man delivered by horse and cart, the butcher and grocer had men/boys on bicycles to bring your groceries right to your door and you had the same order most times.

Guess what – it’s the 21st century now and Coles/Woollies allow you to choose from 1000s of items, order on-line and will deliver right to your door 7 days a week and you won’t have even cross the street let alone stagger from Braddon to City.

bigfeet 1:42 pm 27 Jul 14

Postalgeek said :

So it could be a reference to pulp and no pulp, but I can’t imagine anyone would be so brazenly pretentious as to do that.

If you can’t imagine that level of pretentiousness I assume you haven’t been to Braddon for a while have you?

Postalgeek 8:44 pm 26 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

tuco said :

That’s just the sort of common sense we are trying to address with our beards, fixed gear bikes and cold-pressed juice.

None of which I have. What is cold-pressed juice? My orange juice comes out of an orange.

Well, I know of cold- and hot-press paper, cold-press being with texture and hot-press being smooth. So it could be a reference to pulp and no pulp, but I can’t imagine anyone would be so brazenly pretentious as to do that.

Maya123 11:35 am 26 Jul 14

tuco said :

Maya123 said :

milkman said :

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

Cycling is fine in good weather and when you have plenty of time. When it’s raining, windy, freezing, night, you’re in a hurry, kids are sick, or many other things, cyclking sucks.

I can’t imagine taking kids for a 5km round trip on a bike on a rainy night to pick up some bread and milk from the local.

Bread and milk (milk anyway) are often available from petrol stations and other places, as well as supermarkets, so they might be an alternative (esp. for those living in Braddon). It can also be a matter of thinking ahead when doing the shop. Freeze a spare loaf of bread or two and have several long life cartons of milk as backup for the occasions you run out. Saves the rush to the supermarket in the rain.

That’s just the sort of common sense we are trying to address with our beards, fixed gear bikes and cold-pressed juice.

None of which I have. What is cold-pressed juice? My orange juice comes out of an orange.

Masquara 10:35 pm 25 Jul 14

Postalgeek said :

There’s the smell of astroturf about this post:

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/braddon-supermarket-haggling-heats-up-again-20140724-zw1pc.html

I doubt anyone outside of Braddon cares much whether Braddon gets an IGA or not. But IGA isn’t a charity and it’s up to Braddon to present a convincing business case for IGA. You moved to Braddon to be close to Civic, and all that entails. An adolescent declaration of self-entitlement is not the best strategy to win over people or businesses.

PS You should only ever think you’re ‘really cool’. If you say it, it doesn’t come true.

Yeah, I guess a “human brochure” might be prone to spruiking any message that pays. That’s the conundrum of the new media environment – none of these PR people have a hope of developing any form of trust in their audience. Treasure traditional journos while you still can!

tuco 5:51 pm 25 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

milkman said :

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

Cycling is fine in good weather and when you have plenty of time. When it’s raining, windy, freezing, night, you’re in a hurry, kids are sick, or many other things, cyclking sucks.

I can’t imagine taking kids for a 5km round trip on a bike on a rainy night to pick up some bread and milk from the local.

Bread and milk (milk anyway) are often available from petrol stations and other places, as well as supermarkets, so they might be an alternative (esp. for those living in Braddon). It can also be a matter of thinking ahead when doing the shop. Freeze a spare loaf of bread or two and have several long life cartons of milk as backup for the occasions you run out. Saves the rush to the supermarket in the rain.

That’s just the sort of common sense we are trying to address with our beards, fixed gear bikes and cold-pressed juice.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 10:16 am 25 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

milkman said :

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

Cycling is fine in good weather and when you have plenty of time. When it’s raining, windy, freezing, night, you’re in a hurry, kids are sick, or many other things, cyclking sucks.

I can’t imagine taking kids for a 5km round trip on a bike on a rainy night to pick up some bread and milk from the local.

Bread and milk (milk anyway) are often available from petrol stations and other places, as well as supermarkets, so they might be an alternative (esp. for those living in Braddon). It can also be a matter of thinking ahead when doing the shop. Freeze a spare loaf of bread or two and have several long life cartons of milk as backup for the occasions you run out. Saves the rush to the supermarket in the rain.

I understand that there are things you can do to plan ahead, and be super organised, but that still doesn’t address issues of weather, convenience, supervising your kids, etc.

Like I said, I love to go for a walk, but we live in the 21st century and when it’s a choice between convenience and not, I’ll choose convenience.

It’s good that you like your bike. Great. But I am a busy person and will continue to use a car when it suits me.

Maya123 9:16 am 25 Jul 14

milkman said :

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

Cycling is fine in good weather and when you have plenty of time. When it’s raining, windy, freezing, night, you’re in a hurry, kids are sick, or many other things, cyclking sucks.

I can’t imagine taking kids for a 5km round trip on a bike on a rainy night to pick up some bread and milk from the local.

Bread and milk (milk anyway) are often available from petrol stations and other places, as well as supermarkets, so they might be an alternative (esp. for those living in Braddon). It can also be a matter of thinking ahead when doing the shop. Freeze a spare loaf of bread or two and have several long life cartons of milk as backup for the occasions you run out. Saves the rush to the supermarket in the rain.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 8:25 am 25 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

I have never been a big cycler (sp?) but have always nejoyed walking (my dog gets an hour every morning). Before kids I would walk to my local shops (then about 1.2km from home) for small things, because I enjoyed the walk, but I didn’t tend to do this if I was in a hurry, had lots to carry or the weather was bad.

With kids, the biggest issue is making sure they’re properly supervised. I sometimes walk with them to my local shops (one is under 2), but never if I have stuff to carry, bad weather, etc.

Perhaps my comment was a bit hasty, and I apologise for that, but I don’t think it’s realistic to have cycling or walking as your main form of transport when raising a family. Yes, it’s possible, but very inconvenient a lot of the time. It’s those less normal situations when it would really bite you – sick kids needing to see the doctor, that terrible realisation you’ve run out of stuff for school lunches (and need to make the 7am dash), etc.

milkman 7:14 am 25 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

Cycling is fine in good weather and when you have plenty of time. When it’s raining, windy, freezing, night, you’re in a hurry, kids are sick, or many other things, cyclking sucks.

I can’t imagine taking kids for a 5km round trip on a bike on a rainy night to pick up some bread and milk from the local.

Postalgeek 11:28 pm 24 Jul 14

There’s the smell of astroturf about this post:

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/braddon-supermarket-haggling-heats-up-again-20140724-zw1pc.html

I doubt anyone outside of Braddon cares much whether Braddon gets an IGA or not. But IGA isn’t a charity and it’s up to Braddon to present a convincing business case for IGA. You moved to Braddon to be close to Civic, and all that entails. An adolescent declaration of self-entitlement is not the best strategy to win over people or businesses.

PS You should only ever think you’re ‘really cool’. If you say it, it doesn’t come true.

HiddenDragon 6:09 pm 24 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

HiddenDragon said :

Maya123 said :

HiddenDragon said :

Maya123 said :

HiddenDragon said :

“….on an icy cold day the last thing I want to do is walk a longer distance to get my hands on some decent groceries. Besides, if you’re walking back to Braddon with shopping bags your arms are going to get sore very quickly..” – which illustrates, nicely, that the claimed convenience (and consequential health and environmental benefits) of urban densification is over-hyped at times.

I’ve seen similar comments about the practicalities of living in inner-city Sydney and Melbourne – which probably answers those who might think that once Braddon gets enough residents, the supermarkets etc. will follow.

Shopping trolleys are available to take the shopping home in. Example: http://www.petersofkensington.com.au/Public/D-Line-Shop-Go-Mode-Shopping-Trolley-Red.aspx
I have also found a backpack can be helpful; as are large panniers on a bicycle. A bicycle can carry a lot, especially for short distances.
JC in comment #28 made good comments.

Yes, those contraptions can also be had locally – at DJs if you want a snazzy, well-designed one, or at the “2 dollar” shops if you want something cheaper, but still fairly practical. In earlier days, they were quite common – depending one how old one is, it’s likely that your mother, grandmother, or great-grandmother had one. But, of course, the world has changed – in the days when those trolleys were relatively common, the great majority of Australian kids managed to walk to and from school (without being abducted or molested).

Those trolleys I think are much more fashionable than they used to be. I once associated them with older women in dowdy overcoats and hairnets. These days I don’t. They are now fashionably retro, and come in much more exciting materials.

“older women in dowdy overcoats and hairnets” – my vague recollection, too (Ena Sharples probably had one). They would have been useful in the pre-supermarket/shopping mall days when shopping was done at the “corner shop” or at “high street” shops which were a manageable walk from home – but not easy to get on and off public transport.

“but not easy to get on and off public transport.”

I imagine most people could manage it. I accept a few people couldn’t. I once brought home two dinner sets on the bus, so a trolley should be manageable.

That’s admirable (the dinner sets) – I mean that, and not in a sarcastic way, but I think it makes you fairly atypical by Canberra standards, if not by the standards of somewhat larger cities (speaking from experience here). By comparison, and for all the predictable swipes Alexandra has received, her expectations are much more typical of Canberra – which takes me back to my earlier point about the practical limitations on the willingness of a diverse range of people to move to and remain in inner inner locations in Canberra.

Maya123 4:34 pm 24 Jul 14

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

What has this to do with it, except that you don’t want to walk or cycle and would rather drive everywhere? My guess you did this before children and nothing changed. Please be honest. It’s not children holding you back from walking/cycling to the shops, but your attitude. There are parents who have no problem with walking and cycling to the local shops. No wonder we have such an obesity problem. Those with children have even more reason to cycle/walk, so as to lead by positive example and give the children the exercise they should be getting.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 1:45 pm 24 Jul 14

Maya123 said :

Watson said :

Couldn’t bother even reading that whole post.

Casey. 2.5 kms to nearest shop which is a tiny Spar. 2.5 kms to the closest bakery and (bad) take-away. 6kms to nearest restaurant, chemist, cafe, big supermarket, department store, butcher, etc.

Wanna swap?

All within a short cycling distance fortunately.

You obviously don’t have children.

Masquara 1:11 pm 24 Jul 14

Entitlement Syndrome sufferer Alexandra: If having a cheap supermarket within a couple of minutes walk of where you live is your top priority – why on earth did you move to Braddon? And don’t get your hopes up – a small supermarket failed in Lonsdale Street just a few years ago AND much of the commercial real estate in Braddon is owned by people who have common interests with several local IGAs.

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