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The magic number: Eleven, give or take

By Spectra - 12 March 2009 14

Many sentencing decisions of late have drawn cries to the effect of “how many times does someone have to ignore court orders before they’re actually punished for it?”. Well, we now have our answer courtesy of Robert Andrew McNamara (ABC Online): It seems that having eleven good behaviour orders, breaching “most” of them, and then getting done for burglary will actually earn you some time in the clink. Specifically, a maximum of 27 months for involvement in the burglary of the Canberra Rockclimbing Centre in Mitchell.

At the risk of editorialising [ED – be our guests], I would have thought that somewhere around the fifth to seventh time the judiciary might have become suspicious that he wasn’t really serious about mending his ways and that something a little more than a slap on the wrist and “don’t do it again” was in order, but I don’t pretend to know the details of the other cases.

What’s Your opinion?


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14 Responses to
The magic number: Eleven, give or take
Furry Jesus 12:17 pm 13 Mar 09

Spideydog said :

Swaggie said :

Doogan again – is this woman the solitary ray of hope that this town has? I’ve given up on the other members of our judicial system – a view increasingly reinforced by my wife’s general observations while doing Jury Duty.

Beth Campbell is a goodin too

Beth Campbell is a babe.

SadMushroom 11:45 am 13 Mar 09

They can breach their court orders as many times as they like as long as they still have someone else to dob in.
My ex breached his AVO that many times that all up he spent 13 years on new AVO’s.
Then after failing to pay unlicenced/unregistered/uninsured he got caught another 3 times in one day. NOT 3 times in a year, BUT 3 times in one day (twice in my driveway which was against his AVO)
They didn’t even take him away, just gave him a notice to appear in court.
He said it was due to alcohol and drug abuse and named his dealer and copped a WHOPPING BIG year and half good behaviour bond and probation..(which he failed to do, so they checked it to make sure it was something he could stick to)

Nothing like knowing there is a 43yo (who could never pass the driving test) in unregistered/uninsured cars with no licence, with a drug and alcohol problem driving around the city and the police/courts know about it.

(His first 2 fines in ACT were 75km and 115km in a school zone in unregistered/uninsured car that he had stolen. They were caught on camera on the same day at different ends of the same street.. He had no licence so they couldn’t take it,,,LOL and the fines were sent to the owner of the car weeks later even though the car was reported stolen)

Isn’t it nice to know that man is still driving around school children??

p1 3:48 pm 12 Mar 09

Been exiled from Goulburn? Come visit Canberra!

Tonka 3:45 pm 12 Mar 09

There is some tourism synergies here.

Where else in the world can you do whatever crime you want for as long as you want and get away free.

Tourism ACT (or whatever the relevant body is these days) should be marketing directly to these people.

Here’s a sample –

‘Canberra… you can do what you want and get away with it… if the incredibly unlucky and unforseen happens and you do go down for something, then we’ve built a brand new housing facility with all the mod cons. You won’t even know you’re in jail.

It’s a gangsta’s paradise. We even build statues of crooks in our fair city.’

We need to be bringing crook tourists here. At the front end of it there will be a little pain for the various victims of crime, but at the back end of it, we could have thousands of criminal tourists wanting to spend up big with their ill gotten gains.

After crooks have done the required photo pose with their guns/drugs/loot/girls whatever, they’re going to need somewhere to spend all that illicit cash.

We could even get residuals from all the future episodes of underbelly they’d have to shoot here.

With a little clever marketing crook tourism would work for so many of us in so many ways. We’d save on advertising too. If we just sent brochures to jails, we’d pretty much get the people we want without the need for expensive tv & radio time.

p1 2:47 pm 12 Mar 09

I’m all for warnings. But it should be in the form of suspended sentences, where a couple of years (maybe five) gets you no criminal record. But if you break that at all, you should be in doing the sentence plus whatever you earn for breaking it.

I can understand occasions when judges give people more then one chance, and I hate the idea of mandatory sentencing, but 11 times? Perhaps a mandatory, “ten strikes and you’re out” law?

MadScotty 1:04 pm 12 Mar 09

The legal system in this retarded tree hugging socialist state is a joke!
Should have had Zero warnings, people like this only ever learn the hard way.

p1 11:47 am 12 Mar 09

Why don’t they Carney him out of town?

Spideydog 10:43 am 12 Mar 09

Swaggie said :

Doogan again – is this woman the solitary ray of hope that this town has? I’ve given up on the other members of our judicial system – a view increasingly reinforced by my wife’s general observations while doing Jury Duty.

Beth Campbell is a goodin too

Furry Jesus 10:08 am 12 Mar 09

Why aren’t home detention orders used more often in the ACT, at least as a step up from a stern lecture from the beak? BRC is overcrowded to the max and apparently AMC is still too clean and tidy to be sullied by letting prisoners in, so we must have some other alternatives which impose a sense of consequence on offenders.

Bring back the stocks.

Swaggie 9:44 am 12 Mar 09

Doogan again – is this woman the solitary ray of hope that this town has? I’ve given up on the other members of our judicial system – a view increasingly reinforced by my wife’s general observations while doing Jury Duty.

vg 9:20 am 12 Mar 09

“And if you offend again I will be forced to caution you for an 11th time”

johnboy 8:54 am 12 Mar 09

chrispy said :

Bring on the Japanese judicial system which has a 98% conviction rate.
You can’t argue with the safe streets for everyone, any street, 24×7.

More to do with with entrenched organised crime, and a whole other raft of factors.

chrispy 8:08 am 12 Mar 09

Bring on the Japanese judicial system which has a 98% conviction rate.
You can’t argue with the safe streets for everyone, any street, 24×7.

Pommy bastard 8:06 am 12 Mar 09

One breach should be your limit.

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