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Tony Abbott’s Acts of Bastardry Part I

54-11 22 September 2013 183

I thought I would start a series of Tony Abbott’s Acts of Bastardry, so that there is a running record of all the unconscionable things that he gets up to over the next three (hopefully no longer) years.

1. Sacking of Steve Bracks.  This nasty action by Abbott’s equally nasty Julie Bishop flies in the face of what happened when there was the last change of colour of government.  Back in 2007, Labor inherited Amada Vanstone’s appointment to Italy and later appointed Brendan Nelson and Tim Fischer to diplomatic roles.  A petty and nasty act by a petty and nasty PM and Foreign Minister.

2. Hiding of Boat Arrivals. Abbott and the equally small-minded Scott Morrison have decided that the best way of “stopping the boats” is to stop telling us if and when they arrive.  Under the previous government, the ALP directly announced to the media every time a boat was intercepted in Australian waters.  Not Morrison – he thinks hiding the figures will make the problem go away.

3. Claiming a mandate – Abbott is continuing to claim that he has a mandate for everything he wants to do, despite the fact that he didn’t release his economic policy until 2 days before the election, which was even after many people had done pre-poll voting. After the 2007 election, Abbott said that then Opposition Leader “Brendan Nelson is right to resist the intellectual bullying inherent in talk of “mandates”. The elected opposition is no less entitled than the elected government to exercise judgement and to try to keep its election commitments”.

4. Threatening to overturn any ACT gay marriage change – Abbott is siccing his small-minded A-G George Brandis onto the ACT if it should have the temerity to approve the democratic wishes of the ACT people.  Like Abbott’s hero, John Howard, who overturned the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act of the Northern Territory in 1996, five months after it came into force.

Abbott is a nasty man who leads an already equally nasty government.


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183 Responses to Tony Abbott’s Acts of Bastardry Part I
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howeph howeph 9:40 am 20 Jan 14

7+. Broken Election Promise not to cut funding to NGO Aid Organisations.

Charities, with partnership agreements with the Federal Government, including Care, Save the Children, Caritas, ChildFund, Plan International and the Fred Hollows Foundation have had their planned funding cut by 8%.

Two days before the election Joe Hockey and Andrew Robb said “the Coalition will re-prioritise foreign aid allocations towards Non-Government Organisations that deliver on-the-ground support for those most in need.”

Source: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/18/aid-groups-accuse-coalition-of-broken-promise-after-it-announces-new-aid-cuts

dpm dpm 1:15 pm 12 Dec 13
rosscoact rosscoact 7:34 pm 06 Dec 13

gazket said :

Labor couldn’t a week without being caught out telling lies.

Where’s the surplus Labor….oh you lied about too. $300 billion dollar lie that we all pay for while they collect a pension for stealing off the Australian Public.

Ah its great to be on the other side of the fence. This government has proven by the hour to be variously and sometimes collectively, stupid, mean and astoundingly incompetent.

I wonder when they will break the cycle and get one thing, just one thing, right. Stupid as spit.

Robertson Robertson 4:07 pm 06 Dec 13

gazket said :

Labor couldn’t a week without being caught out telling lies.

Where’s the surplus Labor….oh you lied about too. $300 billion dollar lie that we all pay for while they collect a pension for stealing off the Australian Public.

No idea what you’re blabbering on about, but to put whatever it is in context, here is Tony Abbott:
http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tony-abbott-stuck-in-travel-expenses-cycle-of-shame-20131109-2x8lr.html

Made the taxpayer pay for his flying around the country to attend book signings, mates’ weddings, and to participate in photo ops where he was billing himself as a “volunteer” despite making very handsome costs claims for being there.

gazket gazket 3:47 pm 06 Dec 13

Labor couldn’t a week without being caught out telling lies.

Where’s the surplus Labor….oh you lied about too. $300 billion dollar lie that we all pay for while they collect a pension for stealing off the Australian Public.

howeph howeph 3:08 pm 06 Dec 13

howeph said :

howeph said :

6. Broken promise of support for Gonski education funding reforms:

http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/governments-double-gonski-backflip-an-act-of-brazen-politicking-20131126-2y6zx.html

Well I guess thanks to Abbott and Pyne’s backflip, on their backflip, on their backflip we should remove this act of bastardry… for now.

But let’s see how they can deliberately screw up the implementation.

Correction again: My generous nature got the better of me.

The Abbott / Pyne triple backflip has restored the funding but completely nullified the even more important Gonski funding model.

They killed the Gonski reforms dead.

Number 6 Stays: “Broken promise of support for Gonski education funding reforms.”

rhino rhino 4:48 pm 04 Dec 13

Watson said :

…more money for IT and other education tools and materials…

.

Woops, i forgot to address these last points in my last reply.

I’ve been to harrison school and seen the resources they have and they far outstrip those that I had at a private school until 2005. Kids these days at public schools have laptops they use in the classroom rather than having computer labs. That’s a massive expense and i suspect the benefits are not there really. The idea that pouring money into buying laptops for every student somehow makes them better at reading, writing and arithmetic seems flawed to me. It could even detract from the time that would have been spent in my day on these activities. I can see how it would be useful for them to learn how to use a computer if they didn’t have one at home, but the ACT has the highest IT literacy rate amongst kids in the country from what I hear. And basically every child has a PC of some type at home which they probably know how to use better than many of the teachers. Making fancy looking schools like Gungahlin college seems a little unnecessary also in terms of dollars spent to academic outcome. Spending money on having quantity and quality of teachers is certainly a good way to spend the money though.

I think other factors come into play though, like parental influences. Hence why asians at a dodgy school probably outperform others at better schools.

rhino rhino 4:37 pm 04 Dec 13

Watson said :

Robertson said :

I would like a Public Education system that enforced discipline and strove to push its students to high levels of achievement.

Just as long as they don’t ask for more money to improve the system, right? Better training for teachers, more staff to deal with the “problem kids” that the private system merrily casts out, more money for IT and other education tools and materials…

I don’t think discipline can be improved with money.

At my private school, the teachers didn’t receive any additional training either.

And we had autistic students, ones with extreme cases of violent ADD and ADHD and an epileptic girl in my year. We probably had above average special cases for any school.

Watson Watson 1:41 pm 04 Dec 13

Watson said :

Those who *are* responsible for it prefer to focus instead on lawyering-up for a fight with the Commonwealth over homosexual marriages.

And surely it’s the Federal Govt that’s being the wasteful party here? No one forced them to contest the same sex marriage laws? Which as far as I know, didn’t cost the ACT taxpayers anything extra.

Watson Watson 1:36 pm 04 Dec 13

Robertson said :

Watson said :

The solution is not to give up on the public school system and treat it as free childcare for the poor.

I’m not responsible for the public school system.

Those who *are* responsible for it prefer to focus instead on lawyering-up for a fight with the Commonwealth over homosexual marriages.

They also spent an inordinate amount of our taxes unsuccessfully trying to enforce their ideological beliefs on Calvary Hospital, the net result of which was a large reduction in fertility treatment options for Canberrans (and increased Rates bills).

Join the dots…

Err… wasn’t this discussion about the Federal Gov education funding boost?

One good thing about making private schools fully government funded and abolishing school fees would be that the higher income people would take more of an interest in how much of their tax money goes to education full stop.

Robertson Robertson 11:43 am 04 Dec 13

Watson said :

The solution is not to give up on the public school system and treat it as free childcare for the poor.

I’m not responsible for the public school system.

Those who *are* responsible for it prefer to focus instead on lawyering-up for a fight with the Commonwealth over homosexual marriages.

They also spent an inordinate amount of our taxes unsuccessfully trying to enforce their ideological beliefs on Calvary Hospital, the net result of which was a large reduction in fertility treatment options for Canberrans (and increased Rates bills).

Join the dots…

Watson Watson 11:28 am 04 Dec 13

Robertson said :

I would like a Public Education system that enforced discipline and strove to push its students to high levels of achievement.

Just as long as they don’t ask for more money to improve the system, right? Better training for teachers, more staff to deal with the “problem kids” that the private system merrily casts out, more money for IT and other education tools and materials…

You mention in an earlier post that private school kids cost the government $5000pa less. I think that’s about the amount you’d pay for the cheapest Catholic school here. And I’m not quite sure if that figure applies to those schools. Private schools have a lot more money per student to work with. And it is the major determining factor in the debate about outcomes. The solution is not to give up on the public school system and treat it as free childcare for the poor.

rhino rhino 10:33 am 04 Dec 13

Robertson said :

I’ve seen this in action: some friends believed this guff that you should never say “no” to children. I watched their children get older and, lacking any stated boundaries, their behaviour became wilder and wilder.

I have seen similar examples and I’m quite confident that that is the likely outcome for most children at least. So I consider this PC stuff towards kids as a pretty moronic idea.

Robertson Robertson 10:17 am 04 Dec 13

rhino said :

By the way, I heard from someone who works in childcare now that they are not allowed to say “good boy” or “good girl” to children. They aren’t allowed to say “don’t do that” even! They have to say “instead of bashing Timmy on the head, why not try…”. How silly is that? It’s certainly political correctness gone mad. They had other similar examples but that’s all I can currently recall. In an environment like that, I can really see children becoming brats.

I’ve seen this in action: some friends believed this guff that you should never say “no” to children. I watched their children get older and, lacking any stated boundaries, their behaviour became wilder and wilder.

rhino rhino 10:08 am 04 Dec 13

By the way, I heard from someone who works in childcare now that they are not allowed to say “good boy” or “good girl” to children. They aren’t allowed to say “don’t do that” even! They have to say “instead of bashing Timmy on the head, why not try…”. How silly is that? It’s certainly political correctness gone mad. They had other similar examples but that’s all I can currently recall. In an environment like that, I can really see children becoming brats.

rhino rhino 10:06 am 04 Dec 13

I don’t think anybody has much of a response for Robertson because what he says is pretty bang on accurate.

Robertson Robertson 12:09 pm 03 Dec 13

miz said :

Robertson, when in doubt, I always go to Rawl’s theory of justice. Picture yourself in a society, any society. Now imagine that you have no idea whether you are rich or poor, male or female, young or old, or what your class or financial situation is. This is called the ‘veil of ignorance’.

NOW, given you have no idea about any of those aspects, what sort of education policies would you like? A very different sort from what you are spouting on this website, I’ll wager. If only our Commonwealth government politicians considered this, and acted accordingly.

I would like a Public Education system that enforced discipline and strove to push its students to high levels of achievement.

Now, I look at the reality and I discover a system that is completely dysfunctional and panders to the lowest common denominator at the expense of those who try hard.

I look further and I discover that many, many others have noticed the same as I have, and we have decided to protect our children from the public education system by sending them to schools that have actual standards of behaviour that are enforced so that education can actually proceed.

The failure of the public education system means I demand my taxes be spent on outsourced education providers, for two reasons:
1/ So my children can get a better chance at an education
and
2/ To save taxpayers’ money: the public system is highly inefficient and wasteful – every child funded through a non-government school saves about 30% of the cost of its education.

howeph howeph 9:53 am 03 Dec 13

howeph said :

6. Broken promise of support for Gonski education funding reforms:

http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/governments-double-gonski-backflip-an-act-of-brazen-politicking-20131126-2y6zx.html

Well I guess thanks to Abbott and Pyne’s backflip, on their backflip, on their backflip we should remove this act of bastardry… for now.

But let’s see how they can deliberately screw up the implementation.

rhino rhino 9:42 am 02 Dec 13

IrishPete said :

please provide the evidence. And I mean, research of academic standard.

If you can admit private roads and healthcare are scams, but you won’t admit the same for schooling, then I suggest you are not being objective.

To be fair, your standard here seems slightly inconsistent. You’re demanding peer reviewed academic research from others, but you are basically making the opposite claim and aren’t providing similar research to back up your claim. From past discussions on this topic, I have found academic articles with statistical detailed data to back them up and quite sound arguments to support the private schooling benefits but then someone claims that they are funded by someone with a vested interest in the outcome of the research. I have not been able to find research that hasn’t in some way involved either governments who wish to support their own positions or private think tanks who generally support privatisation. Nobody else has much motivation to conduct this research.

2604 2604 10:54 am 01 Dec 13

miz said :

Robertson, when in doubt, I always go to Rawl’s theory of justice. Picture yourself in a society, any society. Now imagine that you have no idea whether you are rich or poor, male or female, young or old, or what your class or financial situation is. This is called the ‘veil of ignorance’.

NOW, given you have no idea about any of those aspects, what sort of education policies would you like? A very different sort from what you are spouting on this website, I’ll wager. If only our Commonwealth government politicians considered this, and acted accordingly.

If Robertson is like me, he’d want education policies which resulted in his children (and children generally) learning as much as possible, in a positive environment. That is the only way in which any sane parent would evaluate an education policy.

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