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Trouble at the old Tent Embassy

By wooster - 2 September 2011 128

Just looking to share an unfortunate incident that I happened to be witness whilst on my lunchtime constitutional.  A group of tourists, composed of a number of adults with cameras and children in tail, happened upon the grassy area that encompasses the area usually associated with the Tent Embassy.

As innocent as their endeavours appeared to be to the passer-by, one of the local ‘residents’ proceeded to share his views on the tourists encroaching in a manner that would make angels lose their wings.

The youngish looking chap who copped the brunt of the tirade appeared too bamboozled to do anything: he stood completely still while the local shared his thoughts, in the meantime aggressively pointing a sizeable piece of sharpened wood into the younger man’s face.

It would be ungentlemanly for me to share the exact words – needless to say that they were the amongst the worst available to users of the English language.

These tourists clearly had not done anything wrong.  Sadly for them, this will befoul their impression of this town.  This act of aggression was a real head-shaker for myself and the many other people who witnessed it.

Having worked in the area for over 12 mths now, I have personally seen the constabulary called to the location on a handful occasions.  Although I acknowledge the right to protest and the significance of the site; the goings-on of the place are an affront to Canberrans, and just as importantly, to indigenous Australians wherever they may reside.

Apologists in our midst are welcome to canvass exactly how today’s (and previous scraps) are somehow justified by past misdeeds.  However, I assure you that your ideology and your sense of solidarity would not afford you any better treatment, were you to find yourself in a similar situation.

Over to you Rioters – what’s to be done with the Trouble at the old Tent Embassy?

Pip pip,

Bertram Wilberforce Wooster

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Trouble at the old Tent Embassy
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TruthTeller99 12:21 pm 05 Oct 11

Henry82 said :

I think we should all follow this “alternative to employment” approach and see how long this country lasts.

Henry82 11:51 am 05 Oct 11

I think we should all follow this “alternative to employment” approach and see how long this country lasts.

Stevian 11:06 am 05 Oct 11

johnboy said :

There’s no self worth like doing something other people are willing to pay for. Nor having the money from your work to support yourself.

Money is an unfortunate neccessity, but there is very little self-worth to be found in being a wage-slave, hence the term. The greater self worth come from doing for yourself what you would have to otherwise someone to do.

Jungle Jim 11:01 am 05 Oct 11

johnboy said :

There’s no self worth like doing something other people are willing to pay for. Nor having the money from your work to support yourself.

I’d argue that the self worth derived from raising children and caring for a family as a stay at home parent would do better than equal that of earning a few dollars for your services.

That being said, someone in that family has to be earning for them to survive and indeed flourish in modern society.

johnboy 10:51 am 05 Oct 11

There’s no self worth like doing something other people are willing to pay for. Nor having the money from your work to support yourself.

Violet68 10:49 am 05 Oct 11

TruthTeller99 said :

What alternative to employment are you suggesting?

I wasn’t suggesting an alternative to employment. I was stating that employment is not the only means of participating in community. Why place so much emphasis on working for the machine? Why not focus on what creates solid healthy foundations for community? To create a sense of self worth, all people need opportunities to participate in activities that are meaningful to them. If employment is not meaningful, then it won’t be a priority and will become a burden. It is not up to you or I to decide what would work for a particular culture.

Cabin12 10:26 am 05 Oct 11

Anger management courses would seem to be needed – urgently.

TruthTeller99 10:03 am 05 Oct 11

Stevian said :

TruthTeller99 said :

[I have a solution, I outlined most of it already. I find it appalling you would want to have them revert to tribalism in a modern day society,.

So you’re appalled ath the thought of indigenous communities having autonomy in contrast to your plan to use them as a source of slave labour. At least I admit my “solution” is unworkable, yours is also immoral. At least we know where you stand

You’re having trouble grasping what are very simple distinctions here. This is not about slave labour, this is about holding them to the same obligations you hold non-black welfare recipients to. If you don’t find work in 2 years, they require you to be put into a work program, both to discourage you staying out of work, and to keep your industriousness up. When people of any race claim government benefits, they give up some of their rights. For instance, the right to certain privacy you’d normally have, because the government wants to know the circumstances of the people they’re paying. Nobody is forcing a choice on them any different than for ordinary people, namely that with government money come obligations. If they don’t want to do it, they can just avoid claiming benefits.

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