Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Charity and fundraising auctions for the Canberra community

Walking the Centenary Trail in 8 Days: Tuggeranong to Narrabundah

By Heather Lansdowne - 12 May 2016 7

Have you ever thought about walking the Centenary Trail? The 145km loop was established in 2013 to celebrate Canberra’s Centenary, and passes over our picturesque mountain scapes, rivers, fields and forests. Not only will you see stunning natural scenery, you’ll also explore many of Canberra’s suburbs and the Parliamentary Triangle, discovering hidden gems and visiting iconic cultural institutions along the way.

The Centenary Trail was designed to be walked in 7 separate legs, or biked in 3. However, I’ve designed a plan that tackles walking the trail continuously over 8 days, with recommendations for interested places to eat and sleep along the way.

The trail is set out with markers that will guide you on your way at the turning points, and maps and more information are available on the TAMS website.

IMG_2745

Today we’ll look at the third leg of this plan, from Tuggeranong Town Centre to Narrabundah.

If you want to grab coffee or breakfast before you set out, I’d thoroughly recommend Lazy May’s amazing choc banana brioche slider buns. You can also stock up on snacks at the Hyperdome if necessary.

IMG_2727

Once you’re ready to begin, follow the trail markers on Anketell St down to the lake, across the bridge and continue along the bike path under Drakeford Drive, towards the Chisholm shops.

Next you will pass Isabella Pond and meet a stormwater drain which you will follow for the next few kilometres. Continue following the trail makers until you reach the Fadden Pine Plantation, where can make a slight detour if you want to check out some of the cool playground equipment there.

IMG_2754

IMG_2758

IMG_2764

Shortly after the playground you can cross Isabella Drive to the right of the trail and grab some lunch at the Chisholm shops. I had the steak sandwich at the Chisholm Family Tavern, where the staff were super lovely and even fired up the deep fryer early to make my side of fries.

IMG_2770

After you’ve re-stocked your tummy and joined back up with the trail, follow the markers between the houses until you reach the entrance to Waniassa Hills. Continue along through the bushland and alongside some power lines and through the underpass under Long Gully Road. You will walk parallel to the road for a while before you can turn right back into Canberra Nature Park, and continue along between the houses and pine trees until you get to the Issaacs Ridge Loop walk. You will follow this path up along the ridge and to the summit of Mt Sheaffe, where you can take in awesome sweeping views of Canberra and the Brindabellas. When you’re ready, keep going downhill and re-join the track running behind the line of houses. Follow the markers through the pine trees and into a grassy field and native bushland. You will turn right at the Mugga Quarry Access Road and continue through the bushland until you reach Mugga Lane and the official end point for this leg.

IMG_2794

IMG_2803

If you’re looking to stay the night, the Ibis Styles hotel in Narrabundah is just a little further and super comfortable with big beds, nice air con and showers and a pool.

For dinner, I can recommend XO, however I would warn that it’s not as casual as I was expecting it to be and hiking gear will look slightly out of place! Even though I looked pretty rubbish compared to the rest of the clientele, the staff were super friendly and brought me some delicious and mildly spicy Xiu Mai slow cooked Vietnamese meatballs.

IMG_2848

Happy hiking! Have you walked or biked any of the Centenary Trail? Which part was your favourite?

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
7 Responses to
Walking the Centenary Trail in 8 Days: Tuggeranong to Narrabundah
1
Roksteddy 8:40 pm
15 May 16
#

I’ve cycled the trail, doing it over 3 days on 3 different weekends. Highly recommended. The northern border section was probably the best, possibly because I hadn’t been along there before. Red Rocks Gorge is scenic but more stop/start because of gates and walkers.

2
dungfungus 9:46 am
16 May 16
#

gooterz said :

I’ve cycled the trail, doing it over 3 days on 3 different weekends. Highly recommended. The northern border section was probably the best, possibly because I hadn’t been along there before. Red Rocks Gorge is scenic but more stop/start because of gates and walkers.

“gates and walkers.”
Evil!
Ban them!

3
Ezy 3:52 pm
16 May 16
#

Haha – yes, the gates. After just clicking over 100km I was faced with multiple gates to lift the bike over. Swear words were said.

4
Maya123 4:49 pm
16 May 16
#

It’s great you can lift the bike over the gates. Many gates I struggle to do this. I find this discriminatory, as it means many great rides are cut off from those who are still able to ride, but not being as young as they once were (or have other physical limitations) have difficulty lifting their bicycle over the gate. Bicycles might be allowed, but only for those young and able enough. There should be narrow openings for these paths that a bicycle can be taken through without the need to lift it, such as has now miraculously appeared at the Nature Park entrance off Narrabundah Lane, Symonston.

5
Ezy 5:17 pm
16 May 16
#

wildturkeycanoe said :

It’s great you can lift the bike over the gates. Many gates I struggle to do this. I find this discriminatory, as it means many great rides are cut off from those who are still able to ride, but not being as young as they once were (or have other physical limitations) have difficulty lifting their bicycle over the gate. Bicycles might be allowed, but only for those young and able enough. There should be narrow openings for these paths that a bicycle can be taken through without the need to lift it, such as has now miraculously appeared at the Nature Park entrance off Narrabundah Lane, Symonston.

How do you think horse riders go when they come to these gates? Horses are far heavier than bikes.

6
Maya123 8:44 pm
16 May 16
#

madelini said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

It’s great you can lift the bike over the gates. Many gates I struggle to do this. I find this discriminatory, as it means many great rides are cut off from those who are still able to ride, but not being as young as they once were (or have other physical limitations) have difficulty lifting their bicycle over the gate. Bicycles might be allowed, but only for those young and able enough. There should be narrow openings for these paths that a bicycle can be taken through without the need to lift it, such as has now miraculously appeared at the Nature Park entrance off Narrabundah Lane, Symonston.

How do you think horse riders go when they come to these gates? Horses are far heavier than bikes.

Jump of course!

Seriously, these paths should not have locked gates. Unfortunately though, if the car sized gates are unlocked some people will take the opportunity to drive in and dump rubbish. However, an unlocked gate too small for cars (but big enough for horses and bikes) should be available.

7
Ezy 8:05 am
17 May 16
#

lobster said :

madelini said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

It’s great you can lift the bike over the gates. Many gates I struggle to do this. I find this discriminatory, as it means many great rides are cut off from those who are still able to ride, but not being as young as they once were (or have other physical limitations) have difficulty lifting their bicycle over the gate. Bicycles might be allowed, but only for those young and able enough. There should be narrow openings for these paths that a bicycle can be taken through without the need to lift it, such as has now miraculously appeared at the Nature Park entrance off Narrabundah Lane, Symonston.

How do you think horse riders go when they come to these gates? Horses are far heavier than bikes.

Jump of course!

Seriously, these paths should not have locked gates. Unfortunately though, if the car sized gates are unlocked some people will take the opportunity to drive in and dump rubbish. However, an unlocked gate too small for cars (but big enough for horses and bikes) should be available.

The majority of the gates do have a chain around them that you can unhook and open – but there are a few there that are locked. Some along the Kambah Pool trail go through farmland with stock so they need to make sure the cows don’t go missing. If you are on horse on this section, The Bicentennial Trail (http://www.bicentennialnationaltrail.com.au) passes almost the same way which is more horse friendly.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au

Search across the site