Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Opinion

Expert strata, facilities & building management services

Windscreen washers on Northbourne are local legends

By Alexandra Craig 19 May 2015 43

car-stock031214

Most of the intersections along Northbourne Avenue have a resident windscreen washer.

Northbourne’s windscreen washers are all men, and it’s often difficult to tell their ages as their faces are obscured by sunglasses, facial hair and sometimes a baseball cap. These men are at their post almost all day, every day. I’ve often said they’re the hardest working people in Canberra.

I don’t mind them. I often say no to a windscreen wash because my windscreen hardly ever needs a clean, and I also rarely have cash on me. Sometimes they do it for me anyway, for free, and they throw in a smile and a wave. Sadly, on the odd occasion I’ve seen motorists motion ‘yes’, and then make no attempt to pay, speeding off the second the lights go green. I’ve heard stories of the windscreen washers being abused, told to get a ‘real job’, or being called junkies, druggos, alcoholics etc.

I think the abuse these guys cop is totally unwarranted. I have no doubt they work much harder and longer than most people I know (who actually work very, very long hours at demanding jobs). While some would say their job as a windscreen washer funds their drug and alcohol habits, I don’t think this is entirely true. Sure, some of them might use the cash for these habits, but not all of them would. And for those that do, they’re going to fuel their addiction somehow – I’d definitely prefer them working and earning their own money rather than having to take part in illegal activities to get some cash.

Many readers will remember Lindsay the windscreen washer at the intersection of Northbourne Avenue and Barry Drive. Lindsay sadly passed away in 2013, and there was a huge public outpouring of grief. I was really cynical about this. Plenty of my friends on Facebook had written status updates paying tribute to Lindsay which annoyed me because I knew they had previously groaned about ‘annoying windscreen washers’ or made comments about them being criminals or ‘crackheads’.

I used to always have a giggle every time I pulled up to Linsday’s intersection because it was the same thing every time. I would say ‘No, I’m okay. Thank you though!’ And Lindsay would say ‘Nah, you’re right mate,’ and do my windscreen anyway. We’d both laugh and he’d move on to the next car. We had this same interaction about two or three times a week from the time I moved to Canberra in 2011, to just before he died in 2013.

There’s a great little short film on Lindsay (you can find it here) where he said he found it difficult to get a job because he had a criminal past and was on the methadone program, so he found his own type of work. I love that these guys are self-starters. I know some people would whinge that they don’t pay tax, but if they didn’t work and sat around all day they’d cost the taxpayer a lot more in the long term.

I have no idea how much money the average windscreen washer makes each week. I hope it’s enough to stay well-fed and clothed, however if there’s a few rainy days in a week I bet it would greatly affect their income.

While some motorists haven’t had the best experience with the windscreen washers in the past, I think the majority of people have had positive encounters. These guys are part of the social fabric that makes Canberra such a great place. If they weren’t there tomorrow, I’d miss them and I think many others would too.


What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
43 Responses to
Windscreen washers on Northbourne are local legends
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newest
oh_ 8:51 pm 21 May 15

Alex, I agree theyre part of the character of Canberra and good on them for offering a service and being somewhat entrepreneurial in their own way, as opposed to begging or worse (eg crime, in the event they have addictions which appearances suggest a few do). Who cares if theyre on Centrelink as well and pocket a little extra cash, a mans gotta make a living. The only thing that slightly bothers me is when they hold up traffic when the lights go green, and when you say no and they go ahead and wash anyway, expecting law of averages some people will feel guilty/sorry for them and cough up anyway (I notice they do this more to women than men, maybe playing on womens generally greater sympathies and empathy). But thats small bickies in the scheme of things. It was sad when that one died, it is a little moment of humanity in an otherwise uneventful commute.

Kalliste 8:21 pm 21 May 15

After reading the article and the comments I’m still not sure how these guys cost less tax payer dollars by doing this work.. you’re making the assumption they’re not on the dole/pension while making these tax free dollars? Highly unlikely, they’re costing us as much as the beggars in the city except that the beggars in the city don’t hassle you after you say no.

As far as the long work hours without breaks, I can confirm that isn’t true of the guy on the corner of Antill and Northbourne, I have seen him many a time having a break, sitting out the front of the TAB with a smoke so his income isn’t solely to feed himself and provide shelter and I’m sure he drugs would be involved somewhere.

It’s interesting that you find it ok to ‘legally’ make some money (as opposed to stealing/robbing) to feed their illegal habits.

As for if you hit a car as a pedestrian legally crossing the road and if they did the same as ‘businessmen’ the penalty probably would (or should) be different.

I’d have no issue with them being there if they took no for an answer. If I say no, it doesn’t mean I want a freebie, it means I don’t want you to do it. At this point they’re more of a nuisance than legends.

Blen_Carmichael 7:34 pm 21 May 15

Alexandra Craig said :

chewy14 said :

I’ll try this again,

Alexandra, you do realise there are other choices than “doing nothing” and “window washer” right? It isn’t an either or situation. The idea that there is “nothing” else they could do is ridiculous.

As I said in my surprisingly moderated comment, I’ve seen these people abuse motorists many times, including witnessing the many domestic disputes one of these fellows used to have with his female companion near Northbourne and throughout Civic throughout the years.
And you seem to be under the misapprehension that some of these fellows aren’t affected by their drug addictions whilst working on their squeegee? Of course maybe I’m wrong and they just have wild mood swings and exhibit extremely strange and seemingly intoxicated behaviour after visiting their “friends” in nearby flats?

As for calling the cops, LOL. What exactly do you think they’re going to do? Even if the police had the manpower to move them on, they will simply return later or the next day and the ACT government has freely admitted they’re tolerant and allowing of the window washing itself.

If no one will hire someone because they have a criminal history and are on the methadone program, what else do you propose they do?

Like anything reported to the police, if the same problem is reported regularly and consistently by enough people, the police will do something about it. They can’t go to every single call every day, it’s impossible. But if it’s a continuing problem with enough people reporting it they’ll sort it out. Next time you see this abuse happening give the police station a call.

I’m interested to hear more about your assurance that the police will “sort it out”. Could you please elaborate, and perhaps refer to the specific legislative powers police have to deal with windscreen washers.

Genie 1:22 pm 21 May 15

Window washers are pests ! I can’t stand them. I’m always left alone if I have a male in the car with me, but if I’m by myself they magically don’t understand no. In the past I’ve had my window punched because they continued to clean my windscreen for “free” and I refused to pay, I’ve also been verbally abused on other occasions for saying no and refuses to pay money when they clean the window anyway.

As for them been drug addicts. Yes, yes they are. I can attest to at least one window washers drug use. He receives disability from Centrelink and uses the window washing money (which can be several hundred dollars a day) to buy his drugs. Despite several admissions a year to rehab he checks himself out after a few days costing his father a small fortune each time.

gemqueen 7:27 am 21 May 15

Alexandra Craig said :

chewy14 said :

I’ll try this again,

Alexandra, you do realise there are other choices than “doing nothing” and “window washer” right? It isn’t an either or situation. The idea that there is “nothing” else they could do is ridiculous.

As I said in my surprisingly moderated comment, I’ve seen these people abuse motorists many times, including witnessing the many domestic disputes one of these fellows used to have with his female companion near Northbourne and throughout Civic throughout the years.
And you seem to be under the misapprehension that some of these fellows aren’t affected by their drug addictions whilst working on their squeegee? Of course maybe I’m wrong and they just have wild mood swings and exhibit extremely strange and seemingly intoxicated behaviour after visiting their “friends” in nearby flats?

As for calling the cops, LOL. What exactly do you think they’re going to do? Even if the police had the manpower to move them on, they will simply return later or the next day and the ACT government has freely admitted they’re tolerant and allowing of the window washing itself.

If no one will hire someone because they have a criminal history and are on the methadone program, what else do you propose they do?

Like anything reported to the police, if the same problem is reported regularly and consistently by enough people, the police will do something about it. They can’t go to every single call every day, it’s impossible. But if it’s a continuing problem with enough people reporting it they’ll sort it out. Next time you see this abuse happening give the police station a call.

There are plenty of people with criminal records who work and being on the methadone program is not something one needs to declare to an employer. It’s easier to wash windows, tax free and make quite a bit of money seemingly.

creative_canberran 12:11 am 21 May 15

One of them once rushed the car without asking, whatever they used left a slick on the glass that took a lot of washing to get off. Ever since I’ve adopted a no-tolerence approach. They get one “No mate” and if they try it, as one did, they get hosed with the car’s sprayer and lose an ear drum.

They serve no useful purpose, at best they’re an annoyance, at worst a menace. Get rid of them.

Alexandra Craig 11:44 pm 20 May 15

chewy14 said :

I’ll try this again,

Alexandra, you do realise there are other choices than “doing nothing” and “window washer” right? It isn’t an either or situation. The idea that there is “nothing” else they could do is ridiculous.

As I said in my surprisingly moderated comment, I’ve seen these people abuse motorists many times, including witnessing the many domestic disputes one of these fellows used to have with his female companion near Northbourne and throughout Civic throughout the years.
And you seem to be under the misapprehension that some of these fellows aren’t affected by their drug addictions whilst working on their squeegee? Of course maybe I’m wrong and they just have wild mood swings and exhibit extremely strange and seemingly intoxicated behaviour after visiting their “friends” in nearby flats?

As for calling the cops, LOL. What exactly do you think they’re going to do? Even if the police had the manpower to move them on, they will simply return later or the next day and the ACT government has freely admitted they’re tolerant and allowing of the window washing itself.

If no one will hire someone because they have a criminal history and are on the methadone program, what else do you propose they do?

Like anything reported to the police, if the same problem is reported regularly and consistently by enough people, the police will do something about it. They can’t go to every single call every day, it’s impossible. But if it’s a continuing problem with enough people reporting it they’ll sort it out. Next time you see this abuse happening give the police station a call.

matt31221 8:52 pm 20 May 15

What a wonderful post Alexandra, I completely agree and love the positive tone.

To the haters, I think perhaps you need to take a good look at how privileged you are in life. Not everyone has it fair – at least the window washers are having a crack the best way they know how.

Furthermore, let’s hypothetically say the majority of window washers have a drug addiction. Perhaps Heroin. Heroin is very expensive and the addiction is like a disease. An addict will do anything for their next hit, if rehabilitation services and intervention help are not available to them; would you rather they wash car windows for change or burgularize your house? Possibly while your children are at home? Would you like them to steal your car because when desperate some addicts will do anything for the money to pay their dealers and the police can’t be everywhere at once.

fabforty 5:52 pm 20 May 15

Local Legends ? No.

Pests ? Absolutely.

I would never miss these guys. I wish they would learn two basic rules: No, means no, and get off the road when the lights change

Grrrr 5:03 pm 20 May 15

I’m not going to argue that these guys don’t work hard, etc etc – but I’ll say this: It doesn’t matter whether you’re being precious of your car, don’t want to owe them anything, or any other reason – if you say no, they shouldn’t touch your vehicle.

Also, on plenty of occasions they start washing a windscreen just before the lights change and don’t get clear until half-way through the green – delaying sometimes quite a few cars behind. And those lights can take a few minutes before the next cycle. In Dickson this can mean delaying not one but two lanes of right-turning vehicles.

Well intentioned they may be, but while the above continues to happen, I’m calling them pests.

They won’t wash if you have: A car with automatic wipers that come on as soon as water hits the window. Or, a vehicle with a window out of easy reach!

madelini 4:32 pm 20 May 15

Alexandra Craig said :

Fair enough. Lindsay never hassled me, didn’t even come close to it. Maybe sometimes it has to do with the attitude and manners of some motorists. Why don’t people call the police if they’re abused by a windscreen washer? It’s not like they’re going to flee the scene.

On the flip side, maybe the window washers get more mouthy at times because they know that no one will call the police – drivers generally aren’t on Northbourne for a meander, and don’t want to hang around with someone who has yelled at them or someone else until the police are able to make it there. I don’t know about you, but if someone yelled at me when I was in my car, I’d hardly pull over and stay there until law enforcement arrived.

chewy14 4:17 pm 20 May 15

I’ll try this again,

Alexandra, you do realise there are other choices than “doing nothing” and “window washer” right? It isn’t an either or situation. The idea that there is “nothing” else they could do is ridiculous.

As I said in my surprisingly moderated comment, I’ve seen these people abuse motorists many times, including witnessing the many domestic disputes one of these fellows used to have with his female companion near Northbourne and throughout Civic throughout the years.
And you seem to be under the misapprehension that some of these fellows aren’t affected by their drug addictions whilst working on their squeegee? Of course maybe I’m wrong and they just have wild mood swings and exhibit extremely strange and seemingly intoxicated behaviour after visiting their “friends” in nearby flats?

As for calling the cops, LOL. What exactly do you think they’re going to do? Even if the police had the manpower to move them on, they will simply return later or the next day and the ACT government has freely admitted they’re tolerant and allowing of the window washing itself.

madelini 4:16 pm 20 May 15

Solidarity said :

bryansworld said :

Good on them for providing a service that some people value. Not as happy about the time we stopped at the Northbourne Avenue/London Circuit lights, were offered a clean, politely declined, and then got the guy yelling “how am I going to f—ing feed my f—ing children” through the open window. My kids (primary school and younger) were all in the car. Not so nice. I guess we all have bad days. Generally the guys are pretty polite.

I witnessed one of them giving “life advice”… “Just be normal mate just be normal why don’t you just be normal you stupid c—“… The dude was wearing a turban, that was all.

Then sitting in traffic so many times they’ll target the lone woman as it’s an easy sale… they deny “F— you you stupid s—“

Local legends? More like local losers. No sympathy from me.

I also witnessed the same guy giving “life advice” – he was yelling at the guy through the window – from what I could see, his only crimes were wearing a turban and declining a window clean. It’s not the first time that I have seen the window washers yell at the people inside the cars either, and I would argue that it’s that level of uncertainty that would make most people (myself included) wary of them.

Alexandra Craig 3:48 pm 20 May 15

farnarkler said :

The ACT Government needs to do something about them in terms of employment law. What if one of them is approaching a $200k Porsche, trips and dents a panel or chips paint. The owner has no way of getting the individual to pay the bill.

Wouldn’t this be covered under the same law as if I was crossing a road, tripped and whacked my big handbag into the side of a car? No idea what that law actually is but I presume it’s a thing…

tuco said :

vintage123 said :

I always give some cash to the young kids who wash the windscreens of the cars at the local shops on the weekends. I think it takes a lot of courage to put yourself out there and do this kind of stuff.

What I don’t get is why these guys never set up to wash the whole car. I’d be impressed by a kid with a bucket and sponge who is prepared to wash a car. Don’t say it can’t be done – I’ve seen it in country towns when the kids think ahead and actually do something to make a few bucks.

When I was growing up I remember some kids used to do it at the local shops – 2 or 3 of them on one car at a time, had it done in a few mins. Not sure if it’s still done or not. I suppose people would be less likely to pay someone to wash their whole car if that person is an adult because they could just take it to Waves or one of those car washing places and get it done properly. If it’s a kid doing fundraising I think people are more likely to agree.

Evilomlap said :

To answer your curiosity Alexandra, I knew one of these guys a few years back. Sadly he has also passed away, but he told me on a really good day, he could pull in $40 an hour ($2 coins add up fast).

Thanks for the info! Sorry to hear he has passed away 🙁 🙁

Rollersk8r said :

Ok I’ll bite.

Window washers are just one step up from beggars. In fact they are beggars – with a pressure sales approach. I completely disagree that they are either hard working or providing a valuable service. It’s not exactly work ethic or love of the job keeping them out there, is it? No, it’s defending their patch in the game of forcing and guilting money out of people. It’s the lowest possible form of work – right up there with forcing $100 out of old ladies to paint their house number on the gutter. How it is even hard work? Pretty much any tradesman works harder physically.

They’re not forcing or guilting money out of anyone. I always say no, and when they do it anyway they don’t expect money. They just give me a smile and move on to the next car.

“Lowest possible form of work” – far out, so elitist. At least they’re doing something with their life. Like I said earlier, would you prefer them to just sit around on the streets all day. Lindsay said in his interview that he can’t get a regular job because he’s on the methadone program, has a criminal history, so people won’t hire him. He could easily have sat outside the Canberra Centre and harassed passers by, but instead he chose to keep himself busy and earn some money that way.

If it’s not hard work then I challenge you to get out on Northbourne in the middle of winter at 6.00am, and stay until 7.00pm, then in January get out there again at 6.00am and stay until the sun goes down. Wash windows all day, with no break, then tell me how easy it is. And if it’s so easy, do it every day for a week then report back.

vintage123 said :

I always give some cash to the young kids who wash the windscreens of the cars at the local shops on the weekends. I think it takes a lot of courage to put yourself out there and do this kind of stuff.

Totally agree! The young kids I’ve seen in the past are often doing it for school or sports team fundraising but the standard still applies – they’re putting themselves out there and working hard to earn money, whether it’s for themselves or for a fundraiser.

Like I said – the only reason they’re out there all day (and the reason they choose Northbourne) is someone else would take their spot if they weren’t. Northbourne provides the maximum amount of traffic for them to hassle. Your hero Lindsay was the worst offender when it came to forcing people into a “free” service they didn’t want, then demanding payment, THEN abusing people if they didn’t pay. It’s a fact – I witnessed it dozens of times.

I would prefer they shined shoes, actually. I’d be willing to pay for that. And it would take some effort to start shining my shoes when I didn’t want them to! But funnily enough I’m sure this job would be beneath even happy-go-lucky window washers.

Fair enough. Lindsay never hassled me, didn’t even come close to it. Maybe sometimes it has to do with the attitude and manners of some motorists. Why don’t people call the police if they’re abused by a windscreen washer? It’s not like they’re going to flee the scene.

Mysteryman said :

Alexandra Craig said :

Mysteryman said :

I can’t comment on any drug abuse – since that would be pure speculation – but everything else you said rings true. Their “service” is generally poor and I don’t want them smearing my windscreen and making it worse, even if they’re giving me a freebie. When I say no, I mean it – don’t touch my car.

I’m happy to pay for services that I need/want, I’m also happy to give to people in need of money. But I really don’t like when Canberrans act like these guys are heroes or doing something admirable.

I love that these guys are self-starters. I know some people would whinge that they don’t pay tax, but if they didn’t work and sat around all day they’d cost the taxpayer a lot more in the long term

Self-starters? Please. I think you’ll find they are still receiving the exact same benefits as someone who isn’t working. They are just supplementing their government assistance with undeclared income, and as such still cost the taxpayer the same.

Well, no. They wouldn’t cost the taxpayer the same. If they have drug and alcohol problems, or no stable means of shelter, or sitting around on the streets bored all day etc, they’re more likely to go and break into a few houses, hold up a few service stations to get some cash. Their health problems will cost you tax dollars in hospital and ambulance fees, and their crimes will cost you tax dollars in court costs and prison time.

Well, yes. They would.

You just had a go at someone a few posts earlier about making assumptions about them, but you’re using those assumptions as the basis for your claim that they are costing us less because they wash windows. I think you’re categorically mistaken. If they have health problems (either drug related or otherwise), then the public system will foot the bill for that regardless of whether these guys are washing windows or not. I’m also intrigued by your assumption that they would all be committing crimes if they weren’t washing windows. There are a lot of people who are out of work, or without accommodation, but they don’t hold up servos because they’ve got nothing better to do

No, because if they are working all day on Northbourne Avenue, that’s 12 hours that they aren’t overdosing on drugs *if* they have drug problems. No one would work as a windscreen washer if they could get proper employment elsewhere. So if these guys can’t get jobs, they’re going to sit around at home. Drug problems or no drug problems, I’d rather see people doing something with their life rather than just sitting around doing nothing all day.

Also, I didn’t say that. I said “if” and “more likely”.

Mysteryman said :

I think it’s very telling that so many people in here consider standing/sitting around an intersection and wiping windows/hassling cars for money to be “hard work”. It’s quite funny, actually.

Get up at 5.30am, be on Northbourne by 6.00am in the middle of winter. Wash windscreens for 12 hours. Don’t take a break except for filling your water bucket. Then I want you to go and do it again in the middle of summer. If it’s so easy, prove it.

Holden Caulfield 2:50 pm 20 May 15

Mysteryman said :

…I’m also intrigued by your assumption that they would all be committing crimes if they weren’t washing windows…

I can play the assumption game too.

Riddle me this, tax evasion is a:

1. birthright
2. privilege
3. crime

But maybe the OP has documentary evidence that confirms the income derived from said window washers is fully declared to the ATO. Alas, I assume not.

TBH, I’d have no problems at all if the window washers understood that “no thanks mate” means no, it doesn’t mean “only kidding mate, of course I want you to go ahead and do a crap job of washing my window, why would you ever think I wouldn’t want that, who wouldn’t want that?!”

To be fair most do comply with a polite decline to their advances, but there was one guy in particular, he used to often work the Northbourne Ave/Macarthur Ave intersection, who was/is a very aggressive little prick. And, anecdotally, I’ve been told he could be more aggressive to cars with a single female in them.

Dealing with him on a regular basis when I lived nearby kinda spoiled the whole concept for me. I would never actively campaign to remove these guys, partly because some probably are trying to make something out of nothing, but as I said, I would not miss them at all.

rosscoact 2:10 pm 20 May 15

Rollersk8r said :

I would prefer they shined shoes, actually. I’d be willing to pay for that. And it would take some effort to start shining my shoes when I didn’t want them to! But funnily enough I’m sure this job would be beneath even happy-go-lucky window washers.

The reason we can’t get our shoes shined by a tow-headed larrikin street urchin is because the riffraff are funded by the nanny state to have three squares and a roof over their head. Get them living in a cardboard box under a bridge and they’d be happy to shine your shoes for a stale piece of pie crust.

Mysteryman 12:53 pm 20 May 15

I think it’s very telling that so many people in here consider standing/sitting around an intersection and wiping windows/hassling cars for money to be “hard work”. It’s quite funny, actually.

Rollersk8r said :

I would prefer they shined shoes, actually. I’d be willing to pay for that. And it would take some effort to start shining my shoes when I didn’t want them to! But funnily enough I’m sure this job would be beneath even happy-go-lucky window washers.

I would prefer that too. And I’d actually take the time to pay them a couple bucks to do it. Smearing my window? Not so much.

Mysteryman 12:49 pm 20 May 15

Alexandra Craig said :

Mysteryman said :

I can’t comment on any drug abuse – since that would be pure speculation – but everything else you said rings true. Their “service” is generally poor and I don’t want them smearing my windscreen and making it worse, even if they’re giving me a freebie. When I say no, I mean it – don’t touch my car.

I’m happy to pay for services that I need/want, I’m also happy to give to people in need of money. But I really don’t like when Canberrans act like these guys are heroes or doing something admirable.

I love that these guys are self-starters. I know some people would whinge that they don’t pay tax, but if they didn’t work and sat around all day they’d cost the taxpayer a lot more in the long term

Self-starters? Please. I think you’ll find they are still receiving the exact same benefits as someone who isn’t working. They are just supplementing their government assistance with undeclared income, and as such still cost the taxpayer the same.

Well, no. They wouldn’t cost the taxpayer the same. If they have drug and alcohol problems, or no stable means of shelter, or sitting around on the streets bored all day etc, they’re more likely to go and break into a few houses, hold up a few service stations to get some cash. Their health problems will cost you tax dollars in hospital and ambulance fees, and their crimes will cost you tax dollars in court costs and prison time.

Well, yes. They would.

You just had a go at someone a few posts earlier about making assumptions about them, but you’re using those assumptions as the basis for your claim that they are costing us less because they wash windows. I think you’re categorically mistaken. If they have health problems (either drug related or otherwise), then the public system will foot the bill for that regardless of whether these guys are washing windows or not. I’m also intrigued by your assumption that they would all be committing crimes if they weren’t washing windows. There are a lot of people who are out of work, or without accommodation, but they don’t hold up servos because they’ve got nothing better to do

bryansworld 12:13 pm 20 May 15

rosscoact said :

wildturkeycanoe said :

What are the legal ramifications for these guys if something were to go wrong.
Property damage to someone’s car is a big issue, but injury or death by getting hit by a car would be a nightmare for the courts to battle out. As soon as there is an incident, the government will have to ban the practice.
WHS & E is mandatory for all employment activities. I’m sure not one of the window washers has a safe work procedure written down and presentable to Worksafe ACT. Even though a few have hi-viz vests on, there are laws to comply to. What about earning income as a sole trader without an ABN?
It might not be illegal to wash windscreens but they are breaking laws by taking payment for it.

I seem to recall there was a guy hit in Narrabundah? Could be wrong about that. There was a bit of a kerfuffle at the time but people have bigger fish to fry. If there was to be any legal control over them it would be in the road rules. Then you could have police fining them as long as the police didn’t have anything better to do (unlikely but a possibility).

You don’t need an ABN if you earn under $75,000 a year.

I’m pretty sure you could get them under the roads legislation for something.

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2019 Region Group Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
the-riotact.com | aboutregional.com.au | b2bmagazine.com.au | thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site