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Zeddites triumphant

By johnboy - 28 March 2013 36

The ABC reports that despite all the sound and fury of the Pogos* Zed Seselja still had the numbers the second time around for the winnable Senate seat in the ACT.

The Canberra Liberals, in the wake of this shambles are really going to have to extract their digits to hold out the Greens’ Simon Sheikh who can’t be believing his luck right now.

Once again, when it mattered, Gary Kent was all hat and no cattle.

*Beard fanciers


UPDATE 28/03/12: Simon Seikh has wasted no time in twisting the knife:

The ACT Greens Senate Candidate, Simon Sheikh, says that he doesn’t expect that the Liberal party will stop fighting, despite last night’s win by the extreme right wing of the Liberal Party. He has reissued his request to debate the winner of the Liberal Party preselection on the issue of the impacts of Tony Abbott’s job cuts on Canberra’s families.

“Given the events of the last three months, Canberrans can rightfully conclude that the Liberal party care more about fighting for their own jobs then the jobs of Canberra’s families,” Mr Sheikh said.

“Canberrans now have a real choice at this year’s election, between voting for someone who supports Tony Abbott’s plan to cut 20,000 jobs in the ACT, which will devastate our small business and house prices — or someone who will fight these jobs cuts” said Mr Sheikh.

Mr Sheikh says he’s surprised Zed Seselja has so quickly abandoned the people of Tuggeranong who he is supposed to represent in the Assembly. “The people of Tuggeranong have every right to be annoyed that Mr Seselja is abandoning his electorate, seemingly to gain more power for himself”.

The ACT Greens are receiving an influx of donations and volunteers just as the Liberals show signs of struggling to get organised at this election. Last Sunday over 150 people turned out for the first volunteer ‘Meet Up’ event of the campaign.

It will be interesting to see how many of the Liberal party faithful are willing to put the hard yards in for candidate Seselja

What’s Your opinion?


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Masquara 2:55 pm 12 Apr 13

NoImRight said :

#33 Couldnt just have posted a link for those that wanted to read it?

Why revive a thread about your boss and his wafer thin loyalty to Canberra anyway?

Sorry, I didn’t realise, reading online, just how many paragraphs about Sheikh there were – not referring once to Canberra. Another interesting snippet about Sheikh that has surfaced, is that where we all thought part of his “four years in Canberra” was working for the (assumed federal) Treasury. In fact he was working for the New South Wales Treasury. That begs the question – out of his 26 years on the planet, as he worked post graduation for the New South Wales Government, how much time has he actually spent in Canberra pre October last year? Simon? How do those “four years in Canberra” fit into your timeline?
And re the “Zed boss” red herring – I would vote for the locally-credentialled Kerrie Tucker to this day if she stood for the Senate, and I have no connection with the Libs.

Bosworth 2:10 pm 12 Apr 13

Masquara = Zed Seselja?

NoImRight 1:53 pm 12 Apr 13

#33 Couldnt just have posted a link for those that wanted to read it?

Why revive a thread about your boss and his wafer thin loyalty to Canberra anyway?

Masquara 12:52 pm 12 Apr 13

In the light of current media reports outing Simon Sheikh as having been a paid up Labor Party member for four years until 2008, it’s interesting that this puff piece from mid last year sure appears to describe them (largely in their own words) as 100 per cent Sydney people (Sheikh claims he has lived in Canberra for “much of the last four years” ). Could Simon Sheikh please fess up to being a simple opportunist?

Time Out Sydney July 2012:

They’re not even thirty, and yet Simon Sheikh and Anna Rose are two of Sydney’s most influential movers and shakers. And they’re married

First published on 13 May 2012. Updated on 4 Jul 2012.
They met as idealistic young things at the founding summit of her Australian Youth Climate Coalition five years ago. Now Anna Rose and Simon Sheikh are two of Sydney’s most influential twentysomethings – and they’re hitched. Sheikh, just 26, heads GetUp!, the country’s leading lobbying voice on progressive issues from marriage equality to mental health reform and an affront to any Australian government stifling change. Rose, who founded the AYCC and last month tangled with climate sceptic Nick Minchin on the ABC documentary I Can Change Your Mind on Climate Change, is fast becoming the face of her important movement. And the extra-ordinary – and extraordinarily young – Sydney power couple say they’re just getting started.

Congratulations on the wedding. The first and most obvious question is: how sustainable was it?
Anna Rose: I got back from filming the documentary [I Can Change Your Mind on Climate Change] about three weeks before the wedding and we hadn’t really organised much except the venue. We wanted to make it as green as possible, so I got a second-hand wedding dress from Gumtree; we had it in a national park on the harbour; we had local vegetarian food; we organised a bus so that people didn’t have to drive; we didn’t buy a lot of new stuff… We encouraged a lot of people to donate to AYCC and Oxfam. It was beautiful, it was simple; it was definitely the best day of my life.

I hear you spent your honeymoon writing the book, Madlands, about your time with Minchin. Doesn’t seem very romantic…
AR: We postponed the honeymoon actually, because three days after our wedding the carbon price passed. So we drove down to Canberra in the Prius and we were together in the gallery as the carbon price passed. We took a couple of weeks to wrap things up before we went on our honeymoon; we just drove up to Byron through the national parks and it was so nice. But yeah, I did have to write every day – not ideal.
Simon Sheikh: It was a wonderful honeymoon actually, because now we’ve got something to show for it. Not just the photos but an actual book! I think I was sucked up in some of the research on various occasions as well…
AR: I was like, ‘Google this!’

That’s dedication on both your parts. Anna, what triggered this drive in you to save the planet?
AR: I grew up in Newcastle and I used to surf before school – there were usually between 20 and 30 coal ships on the horizon. But I spent all my summer holidays on my uncle’s farm and my grandparents’ farm in Moree and Gunnedah. The drought was really severe back then and I started connecting the dots between the drought that was affecting my family’s farm, the coal that my hometown was exporting and this greenhouse effect thing that I was learning about in school.

Simon. Did you have similar triggers growing up?
SS It’s a different story to Anna and yet it’s one embedded in the same value set. I grew up on the border of Newtown and Enmore – a great part of the world, and a part of the world that’s changed a lot in the last 20 years. I was in public housing at the time. But what I kept seeing were people around me who were in even more challenging circumstances. One of my earliest memories is of my primary school principal having to use her own money to fund basic clothing and footwear for some of the other students. That embedded in me the same sense of social justice that drove Anna.

One formative experience outside of school you’ve spoken about was caring for your mum, who has chronic mental illness.
SS: It was from a fairly early age that my father got sick – he had a severe heart attack – and wasn’t able to play the caring role for mum. It meant that from about ten, I took a more full-time role in that capacity. Simple things like making sure my mother was going to the doctors’ appointments and the dentists, buying the train tickets and going with her. And then you take on a further role in coordinating healthcare efforts, because the mental health system is very disaggregated – lots of parties all over the place. A lot of work’s being done now through the Mental Health reform package [which GetUp! has campaigned for strongly under Sheikh] to bring together aggregated care, but in those days that didn’t exist.

You’ve also got to have all the medication shots; you’ve gotta make hard decisions about whether or not to try new medications. One of the things that my mother was unfortunate enough to have to go through was to be a guinea pig for every second mental health drug there was over the last 30 years. And that doesn’t leave one in a good position to be able to function.

It’s a cliché to ask: but did it make you grow up more quickly?
SS: Well, I think we all respond to the contexts we find ourselves in, and the context where I found myself was one where I had to respond to an ever-increasing set of complex moments. I think that’s been useful to be able to understand the complexities of various systems. I use that in my work to understand what we should be doing to campaign in various areas.

[A man walks past the café we’re sitting outside and yells, ‘Keep up the good work, stick it to them.’ Simon says the couple get that all the time.]

Anna, a lot of climate change activists wouldn’t have done the doco you did with the ABC because it’s so “fair and balance” where climate science really isn’t.
AR: I was hesitant at first because climate science is very clear and the science of climate change – the science of human-induced climate change – is actually more certain than the science of linking HIV to AIDS and smoking to lung cancer. But many Australians still have questions about the science – a result of the campaign that mining billionaires have been waging over the last decade really. I thought: if many still have questions about it then it’s important to answer them. And yeah, I’m definitely open to engaging with people who don’t agree with me. Travelling with Nick Minchin for a month was a good example of that!

How was that?
Just to have a conversation with him is quite pleasant – if it doesn’t involve politics.

Much of the debate you guys have been involved with isn’t very pleasant. Simon, GetUp!’s been compared to the “Hitler Youth wing of the Greens”. Others say you guys don’t change anything, just tilt the agenda.
SS:The best thing to do is to look at the examples of what our members have been able to make an impact on. We raised the mental health example earlier. That’s a scenario where you’ve got the mental health minister saying very clearly: GetUp! members put this issue on the agenda and then helped get it across the line. And those who suggest that we’re somehow Hitler Youth are surely doing so because we’re being effective. Not because the Hitler Youth were effective, but because the first person to bring up Hitler loses the debate. If you’re driven to that extreme, then you must be very frustrated because the world you’re seeking to protect is changing.

Do critics ever dismiss you because of your age?
AR: For me it hasn’t been so much my age but my gender. When you look at the people who are opposing action on climate change – people like Clive Palmer, Tony Abbott and Nick Minchin – it is a bit of a boys’ club. To come up against that not only as a young person but also as a young woman, it sometimes makes it easier for them to try to dismiss you.

You don’t seem to ever stop Anna – I’ve seen you talk taxi drivers around from climate scepticism. Is there a part of you that wants to occasionally switch off and veg out?
AR: I’ve had the last two weeks where I was supposed to be resting and taking it easy [Anna had her tonsils taken out days before we spoke], but I find that hard to do. The International Panel on Climate Change has said we need to have global emissions peaking and then declining by 2015; the International Energy Agency has said the deadline is 2017. Either way it’s very, very soon. So no, I don’t really find it enjoyable with those deadlines in my head to not actually be working on climate.
SS: Although… I think that we’ve also done better in the last year to take time for each other and for ourselves as well, recognising that this is a long fight. It’s gonna be a long many years ahead of us!

Will those years see either of you running for parliament? A husband-wife Green leadership perhaps…
AR: I think that at the moment what needs to happen to solve climate change is for hearts and minds to change in the community. And most people don’t trust politicians. Therefore, the work that needs to be done has to come from outside of politics.

SS: Yeah. And I think both of us share an outside theory of change that drives the work we do, and it’s pretty hard to move past that. When you get to see the power of movements versus the power of political parties, you know where you want to work.

Six ways Simon and Anna are changing:
I Can Change your Mind About Climate Change
In early 2012, whilst in the middle of planning a wedding, Anna embarked on the production of a documentary for the ABC in which she attempted to change Liberal pundit Nick Minchin’s views on the climate change debate. The doco aired over two nights in April, followed by a special edition of Q&A, and once more put clean energy at the forefront of public debate. She released a book about the journey the same month. Oh, and she kicked Minchin’s ass.

Power Shift
2009 saw Anna organising the country’s first youth summit on climate change. With conferences, workshops and one particularly moving flash-mob, Anna and her organization (the coalition of progressive young groups called the Australian Youth Climate Coalition) created a dialogue amongst the next generation of environmentalists and activists. The couple are together on this front with Simon and GetUp! also being major players in the climate reform debate – Simon was a founding member of the AYCC when at the United Nations Youth Association.

GetUp!’s marriage equality campaign
Only the heartless remained unmoved after watching GetUp’s marriage equality advert, showing a POV gay relationship in fast-forward, which proceeded to go internationally viral and moisten the tear ducts of more than six million people. But that was just the tip of the work the group was doing: Simon and GetUp! have worked tirelessly to bring this issue to the fore in Australian political debate through rallies, petitions and lobbying, having a huge hand in the changing political tide on the issue.

GetUp’s Electoral Act Challenge
Who could forget the 2010 electoral enrolment fiasco – Australians left, right and centre being unable to enrol after 8pm the day the election was called. Simon and GetUp! were hot on the heels of the case and took it straight to the top, the High Court, to challenge any semblance it had of legitimacy. Their winning appeal allowed many thousands of Australians to vote who otherwise would have been left without a voice.

Save the Tarkine!
One of Australia’s most significant natural landscapes and the largest tract of temperate rainforest in the world is under threat and GetUp! is charging to the rescue. With ten new mines proposed in the Tarkine over the next 10 years, some of them highly damaging strip mines, Simon and his team are pursuing every avenue possible to put a stop to the potential destruction of a natural wonder – including a taking Federal Environment Minitser Tony Burke on a three day trip to the Tarkine to see what Australia might lose.

Poker Machine Reform
With gambling addiction still ripping lives apart across the country, GetUp! are involved in lobbying pokie producers (Woolworths and Coles to name but two) to cap bets and minimise losses and halt addictive spending cycles. As well as direct contact with poker machine manufacturers, GetUp! are petitioning Governmental bodies to tighten legislation around the whole nasty business.

Anna Key 8:55 pm 31 Mar 13

dpm said :

Masquara said :

Anna Key said :

dpm said :

Didn’t Gary Kent just want a fair process, no matter the outcome? If so, he should be happy now I guess?

That’s also what I thought Gary K was getting at – not the outcome itself but the dodgy first process. And now Jeremy and Alithtair can sit comfrotably in the knowledge that Zed won’t be back to reclaim his stated commitment to the ACT assembly and the voters of Tuggeranong

Really weird comment by Zed on the radio this afternoon – committing to keep working for the voters for some considerable time to come! As if! Shouldn’t he have resigned by now?

Zed’s version of ‘work’ may differ from yours. Hahaha!
I think what he meant to say was: ‘I’m going to keep sponging off the MLA pay as long as possible before switching to the even higher, cushier salary!

Oh come on, as an invisible Senate backbencher in the forthcoming liberal govt he’ll be busy trying to stay awake on Committees, ask a couple of dorothy dixers and maybe take part in some fact finding missions to Europe or the US during the harsh Canberra winter.

dpm 6:37 am 29 Mar 13

Masquara said :

Anna Key said :

dpm said :

Didn’t Gary Kent just want a fair process, no matter the outcome? If so, he should be happy now I guess?

That’s also what I thought Gary K was getting at – not the outcome itself but the dodgy first process. And now Jeremy and Alithtair can sit comfrotably in the knowledge that Zed won’t be back to reclaim his stated commitment to the ACT assembly and the voters of Tuggeranong

Really weird comment by Zed on the radio this afternoon – committing to keep working for the voters for some considerable time to come! As if! Shouldn’t he have resigned by now?

Zed’s version of ‘work’ may differ from yours. Hahaha!
I think what he meant to say was: ‘I’m going to keep sponging off the MLA pay as long as possible before switching to the even higher, cushier salary!

Masquara 10:19 pm 28 Mar 13

Anna Key said :

dpm said :

Didn’t Gary Kent just want a fair process, no matter the outcome? If so, he should be happy now I guess?

That’s also what I thought Gary K was getting at – not the outcome itself but the dodgy first process. And now Jeremy and Alithtair can sit comfrotably in the knowledge that Zed won’t be back to reclaim his stated commitment to the ACT assembly and the voters of Tuggeranong

Really weird comment by Zed on the radio this afternoon – committing to keep working for the voters for some considerable time to come! As if! Shouldn’t he have resigned by now?

Anna Key 9:09 pm 28 Mar 13

dpm said :

Didn’t Gary Kent just want a fair process, no matter the outcome? If so, he should be happy now I guess?

That’s also what I thought Gary K was getting at – not the outcome itself but the dodgy first process. And now Jeremy and Alithtair can sit comfrotably in the knowledge that Zed won’t be back to reclaim his stated commitment to the ACT assembly and the voters of Tuggeranong

Deckard 9:08 pm 28 Mar 13

Masquara said :

Roundhead89 said :

Simon Sheikh said:

“As a former Treasury public servant myself, one of the issues I’m passionate about is good government. Good government requires a strong public sector workforce, which is why I’m passionate about stopping Tony Abbott’s job cuts”.

When was Sheikh in Treasury? Was he a decision-maker? Given his age, I doubt it. So he could adopt a “passionate position about government” just as effectively from anywhere. He sounds as though he is scrabbling around for attributes to shore up his campaign, when he’s just an ornery brat with entitlement issues!

Nice work on the pre-selection Zed. Good luck in the election.

dpm 8:44 pm 28 Mar 13

Masquara said :

Roundhead89 said :

Simon Sheikh said:

“As a former Treasury public servant myself, one of the issues I’m passionate about is good government. Good government requires a strong public sector workforce, which is why I’m passionate about stopping Tony Abbott’s job cuts”.

When was Sheikh in Treasury? Was he a decision-maker? Given his age, I doubt it. So he could adopt a “passionate position about government” just as effectively from anywhere. He sounds as though he is scrabbling around for attributes to shore up his campaign, when he’s just an ornery brat with entitlement issues!

Please goto #23. Do not pass go, do not collect $200…..

Masquara 4:58 pm 28 Mar 13

Roundhead89 said :

Simon Sheikh said:

“As a former Treasury public servant myself, one of the issues I’m passionate about is good government. Good government requires a strong public sector workforce, which is why I’m passionate about stopping Tony Abbott’s job cuts”.

When was Sheikh in Treasury? Was he a decision-maker? Given his age, I doubt it. So he could adopt a “passionate position about government” just as effectively from anywhere. He sounds as though he is scrabbling around for attributes to shore up his campaign, when he’s just an ornery brat with entitlement issues!

Masquara 4:53 pm 28 Mar 13

Jim Jones said :

Masquara said :

More Liberal party talking points

Oh FFS. Shut up already.

Wrong quote. I didn’t say that.

Roundhead89 4:29 pm 28 Mar 13

Simon Sheikh said:

“As a former Treasury public servant myself, one of the issues I’m passionate about is good government. Good government requires a strong public sector workforce, which is why I’m passionate about stopping Tony Abbott’s job cuts”.

Ah yes Treasury. The department which in the early 1980s blew thousands of dollars on U-Bix photocopiers which constantly broke down and blew even more money taking legal action against the company. Also the department which had twice as many people “working” in their Registry section than Dept of Finance despite Finance having twice as many employees than Treasury.

As a former officer at Finance during that period I can tell you many more stories about the department we used to refer to as “the opposition”.

Duffbowl 3:54 pm 28 Mar 13

How about the apologists and sphincter sniffers from all parties take Jim’s advice onboard; it would certainly make my election long haul much happier…

Jim Jones said :

Oh FFS. Shut up already.

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