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17 year old person of interest swabbed for Telopea murder

By johnboy 24 September 2008 113

It’s getting hard to keep track of all the murders in Canberra.

But for the aficionados who’ve been following the Kingston murder of Cameron Anderson, 19, the Canberra Times has more. (Thanks to ikarus for the head’s up).

    The person at the centre of the investigation is a 17-year-old girl who was seen drinking with Mr Anderson at Kingston’s Filthy McFadden’s pub in the hours before the apprentice chef’s death…

    But police, who have not ruled out charging the girl, applied last week to the ACT Children’s Court to obtain forensic samples from the girl. She appeared at a court hearing on Monday morning and consented to a police request for samples of her DNA to be compared with material found at the murder scene.

Seventeen year old “person of interest” drinking at your pub the night of a murder? Not a good look.

What’s Your opinion?


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17 year old person of interest swabbed for Telopea murder
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gospeedygo 3:52 am 14 Feb 11

RIPCA said :

Well it remains to be seen if he was or was not until after the trial is over don’t you thing?

RIPCA 12:11 am 14 Feb 11

i was a friend of Cameron Anderson and he was a nice guy frendly and shy off girls it took him a yea just to say hi to me and i dont believe for a secound that he would attack anyone let alone a knife carring underage drunk and it makes me sick that the bullshit and charater bashing that the feeding the public is being believed, they have made a nice guy in to a pervered sex offender and i know in my heart and mind and soul that none of it is true, cameron wasnt what hes made out to be in the paper and i just wanted people to relies that he was a nice frendly kind guy that wouldnt hurt anyone or anything, shame of the girl that killed him, shes giving camerson such a bad name i hope she gets whats coming to her

tylersmayhem 9:11 am 30 Sep 08

To answer your question peterh, you’ll find that by the law, this is still the establishments responsibility, as is having an under age person on site. I know it’s over the top, but unless laws have changed since the last time I did a Responsible Service of Alcohol course – it won’t be happy days for Filthy’s much longer.

peterh 8:55 am 30 Sep 08

tylersmayhem said :

If I was the owner and/or manager of Filthy McFadden’s, I’d asking someone to get me my brown pants right about now. While establishments usually seem to get away scott free when supplying minors with booze, if Filthy’s is in the centre of a murder investigation, and alcohol is deemed as a contributing factor, then by the law, the establishment can be held accountable for some of the involvement.

While it is bulls**t that much of the blame will be put on Filthy’s, rtaher than the offender, it’s a sad fact that people will be out for blood, and quite likely compensation (family of the victim) at the end of the day. Filthy’s might just tick both these boxes.

another point here is that she may not have bought the grog, but had it bought for her. How would filthy’s be able to control this form of consumption?

they can’t.

but the mob won’t look at that fact, and filthy’s will get tarred with the same brush.

tylersmayhem 8:43 am 30 Sep 08

If I was the owner and/or manager of Filthy McFadden’s, I’d asking someone to get me my brown pants right about now. While establishments usually seem to get away scott free when supplying minors with booze, if Filthy’s is in the centre of a murder investigation, and alcohol is deemed as a contributing factor, then by the law, the establishment can be held accountable for some of the involvement.

While it is bulls**t that much of the blame will be put on Filthy’s, rtaher than the offender, it’s a sad fact that people will be out for blood, and quite likely compensation (family of the victim) at the end of the day. Filthy’s might just tick both these boxes.

Deadmandrinking 4:38 pm 29 Sep 08

There’s heaps of guns on the black market in the US…

peterh 4:34 pm 29 Sep 08

even an unloaded gun or a stick, a rock etc can be used as a bludgeon.

better education about weapons needs to be made available. Banning weapons only drives them underground to the black market.

Deadmandrinking 4:19 pm 29 Sep 08

JB, you need to remember what a gun actually is. It’s a tool that’s only purpose is killing someone or something. Everything else there could be used for something else.

peterh 4:18 pm 29 Sep 08

Thumper said :

I’d like to see the education system develop closer ties with trades and career options which you don’t need a degree for so the whole thing doesn’t seem like a direct path to University and doesn’t alienate those suited for other career paths.

This has been implemented for years through DEST and State Education Departments.

* I’d like to see the legalization of drugs so that it doesn’t put a majority of youth on the wrong side of the law.

This is a major generalisation. Majority on the wrong side of the law? Sorry, you’re just wrong here.

As for the rest, yep, I totally agree, some excellent initiatives in there and ones that any sane person would agree with. In fact, these initiatives would really help lower income families and possibly give them a hand up so that they may progress their development in either education or employment, which is a good thing.

However, I still don’t think that it would make much difference to social problems; crime, drugs, poverty simply because you have to genuinely want to change if you are to change. In the end the individual is responsible for taking any opportunity granted to him or her.

You can lead a horse to water sort of stuff. Those that genuinely want to drink will, but not all as sadly there exists people who will always choose to live outside societal norms and ideals.

(I’m not so sure what the gun laws have to do with anything so I’ll not comment on that)

you need to break the cycle. Kids that are being told at school that they will never amount to anything will either:
a) give up
b) try like hell to prove the teachers wrong
c) accept their lot until their circumstances change – usually for the worse

I fell into category b.

having dyslexia didn’t help.

I have managed to prove most of them wrong, and I am helping others do the same.

the home life of the average offender may be really bad, or a model family. It is down to their own set of values. If they believe that society owes them, they will expect everything on a platter. If they think no-one cares about them, they will shut out the world and care only about themselves.

if they can get away with theft, petty crime, and assault, they will continue to do so.

it is only when they receive intervention from either the authorities or another organisation that they may take stock of their lives and try to change. This is where the most effective work can be done.

If the person can be helped into society through a job, accommodation, etc, they have the chance to succeed in their lifestyle change.

Unfortunately, the govt’s focus over the years (and every govt, not just Labor) has been to throw money at the problem. This isn’t working.

The welfare system is a bloated tick that feeds on the taxpayer.

The outsourced Job Network should have been retained in the hands of the govt, the CES should never have been closed down, and it should still be a requisite to attend the CES once a week, with interview reports for at least 3 companies.

But, the question to reduce the amount of youth mixed up in crime is one that needs to be addressed to ensure that the cycle can be broken.

Aurelius 4:17 pm 29 Sep 08

or a star-picket!

Deadmandrinking 4:17 pm 29 Sep 08

And maybe the victim would have had a better chance of defending themselves…

johnboy 4:16 pm 29 Sep 08

Or broken glass, or a cricket bat, or a pillow.

I’d rather outlaw dangerous actions than dangerous things myself.

Thumper 4:14 pm 29 Sep 08

What if that gun had been secured in a sporting facility?

He probably would have used the new gucci weapon of choice, a knife.

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