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$21 million to boost ACT workforce skills

By Canfan - 18 December 2014 13

Minister Burch and Australian Training Award winners

Minister for Education and Training Joy Burch yesterday launched Skilled Capital, a new $21 million training initiative that will respond to industry identified skills needs.

“Skilled Capital will provide all Canberrans with the opportunity to upskill through access to high quality training in areas of identified skills needs,” Ms Burch said.

“Canberra needs more workers in areas such as early childhood care, disability support services, education support, aged care, and information technology. Skilled Capital will give students the support they need to complete the training that is right for them.

“The ACT Government is committed to increasing the skills of the ACT workforce to ensure the Territory’s economic and social prosperity.

“Skilled Capital will target training to meet the needs of ACT industry and employers, and will complement existing government supported training options available at the Canberra Institute of Technology and through the Australian Apprenticeships Program.

“Skilled Capital will provide subsidised training in a selection of qualifications from the ACT Skills Needs List, as well as a selection of certificate II pathway qualifications that may lead to further training at a higher level. A comprehensive range of support services is also available to students to assist them to successfully complete their qualification.

“Skilled Capital is underpinned by a comprehensive evidence base to ensure it supports high quality training in areas of highest skills need.

“It will provide great opportunities for students and support our commitment to achieve a skilled workforce for the ACT.”

Further information, including the ACT Skills and Training Policy Directions Paper, is available on the new Skilled Capital website: www.skills.act.gov.au

Photo – Minister Burch with Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year Sally Moylan, Australian School-based Apprentice of the Year Eylish Perry, and Fergus Nelson from Just Better Care, the Australian Apprenticeships – Employer Award winner.

(Joy Burch Media Release)

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13 Responses to
$21 million to boost ACT workforce skills
Queanbeyanite 5:24 pm 22 Dec 14

You could continue previous good work and cut payroll tax by another $21 million too.

dungfungus 2:03 pm 22 Dec 14

gooterz said :

$60 a person in the whole of the ACT. Seems a lot for skills training.

Sounds more like Joy is funding people to ‘study’ rather than work and then find jobs doing something else. Unless their is a requirement to go on and actually go into one of these mostly female dominated roles its a waste of money.

Shouldn’t we really be pushing men to take on some of these roles?

$21 million would also be a good start to a new area of business. How about some new farming or something?

Certificate 2’s aren’t long courses either. It sounds like a huge waste of money.
If 1000 do the course that’s 21 grand each.. (A uni degree price for a cert 2).

Exactly.

tooltime 10:14 pm 21 Dec 14

Great,

I urge interested readers to digest this article from the Sydney Morning Herald about how Registered Training Organisations are gaming the system against regular Aussies via paid commissions to Immigration Agents who profit by bringing in foreign workers – and the Governments woeful attempts at monitoring it:

smh.com.au/nsw/call-for-overhaul-of-457-visa-system-to-prevent-risk-of-corruption

This practice is particularly rife in Victoria – I know of one business who bought in 3000 from the sub continent. There’s at least 3000 less jobs for our future generations, and that’s one RTO! My bloods a boiling.

gooterz 8:43 pm 21 Dec 14

$60 a person in the whole of the ACT. Seems a lot for skills training.

Sounds more like Joy is funding people to ‘study’ rather than work and then find jobs doing something else. Unless their is a requirement to go on and actually go into one of these mostly female dominated roles its a waste of money.

Shouldn’t we really be pushing men to take on some of these roles?

$21 million would also be a good start to a new area of business. How about some new farming or something?

Certificate 2’s aren’t long courses either. It sounds like a huge waste of money.
If 1000 do the course that’s 21 grand each.. (A uni degree price for a cert 2).

dungfungus 7:19 pm 21 Dec 14

tooltime said :

Correct me if I’m wrong please, but this Skilled Capital business is just replicating what CIT and a host of other RTO’s are doing, aren’t they?

If it is, WTF is the ACT government blowing ~$21million of the taxpayers hard earned on it?

I mean, what are they offering that’s meaningfully different?

Am I the only one who gets worked up about this government sanctioned wealth destruction, which further debt saddles the middle class?

It’s all about keeping CIT and others afloat and a lot of people are worked up about the way this government keeps propping up lost causes.
Want to bet a lot of this money finds its way to sponsorship of certain professional sporting clubs?

tooltime 11:05 pm 20 Dec 14

Correct me if I’m wrong please, but this Skilled Capital business is just replicating what CIT and a host of other RTO’s are doing, aren’t they?

If it is, WTF is the ACT government blowing ~$21million of the taxpayers hard earned on it?

I mean, what are they offering that’s meaningfully different?

Am I the only one who gets worked up about this government sanctioned wealth destruction, which further debt saddles the middle class?

Maya123 6:11 pm 20 Dec 14

Masquara said :

Maya123 said :

Masquara said :

There are no “disability support”, “childcare” and “aged care” skills shortages as such. Pay a wage that’s higher than working poor, and people will train themselves of their own volition. Train away, CIT and Joy Burch. You’ll just be training up people who need to tick boxes rather than be on the dole. No-one other than a handful of semi-supported spouses, or true altruists – is going to go on to work for $14-odd an hour.

After I retired, I worked for a time as a casual in childcare. I had no relevant qualifications, so was on the lowest wage. I was paid $19 an hour and then $20 an hour (after the government added an extra dollar for low paid workers). Not $14 an hour for an adult (maybe for a 15 year old). Low pay though still, and not something I would have considered for a career. It was also often boring.
I was considered for another job as a full time worker in childcare, at I think from memory $17 (before the extra dollar was added), so still more than $14 an hour. I took the casual position though, as it offered more flexibility.

Casual wage doesn’t compare to fulltime wage, Maya.

Yes, and you can read that the full time (adult) wage I was offered was $17, not $14. And you can see that is why I gave the full time $17 against the casual $19. I also said it was “Low pay though still, and not something I would have considered for a career.” So your point!

Masquara 5:41 pm 20 Dec 14

Maya123 said :

Masquara said :

There are no “disability support”, “childcare” and “aged care” skills shortages as such. Pay a wage that’s higher than working poor, and people will train themselves of their own volition. Train away, CIT and Joy Burch. You’ll just be training up people who need to tick boxes rather than be on the dole. No-one other than a handful of semi-supported spouses, or true altruists – is going to go on to work for $14-odd an hour.

After I retired, I worked for a time as a casual in childcare. I had no relevant qualifications, so was on the lowest wage. I was paid $19 an hour and then $20 an hour (after the government added an extra dollar for low paid workers). Not $14 an hour for an adult (maybe for a 15 year old). Low pay though still, and not something I would have considered for a career. It was also often boring.
I was considered for another job as a full time worker in childcare, at I think from memory $17 (before the extra dollar was added), so still more than $14 an hour. I took the casual position though, as it offered more flexibility.

Casual wage doesn’t compare to fulltime wage, Maya.

Maya123 3:31 pm 20 Dec 14

Masquara said :

There are no “disability support”, “childcare” and “aged care” skills shortages as such. Pay a wage that’s higher than working poor, and people will train themselves of their own volition. Train away, CIT and Joy Burch. You’ll just be training up people who need to tick boxes rather than be on the dole. No-one other than a handful of semi-supported spouses, or true altruists – is going to go on to work for $14-odd an hour.

After I retired, I worked for a time as a casual in childcare. I had no relevant qualifications, so was on the lowest wage. I was paid $19 an hour and then $20 an hour (after the government added an extra dollar for low paid workers). Not $14 an hour for an adult (maybe for a 15 year old). Low pay though still, and not something I would have considered for a career. It was also often boring.
I was considered for another job as a full time worker in childcare, at I think from memory $17 (before the extra dollar was added), so still more than $14 an hour. I took the casual position though, as it offered more flexibility.

Masquara 12:38 pm 20 Dec 14

There are no “disability support”, “childcare” and “aged care” skills shortages as such. Pay a wage that’s higher than working poor, and people will train themselves of their own volition. Train away, CIT and Joy Burch. You’ll just be training up people who need to tick boxes rather than be on the dole. No-one other than a handful of semi-supported spouses, or true altruists – is going to go on to work for $14-odd an hour.

Ryoma 11:27 am 20 Dec 14

I just went and had a look at the ACT Skills Need List on the website shown.

Quelle surprise – many of the skills *needed* are for one of the following two types of role;

a) the caring/social work type positions, such as child care, aged care, youth and community services
b) various trade activities

All of these roles are important, and I respect the people who do them. On that basis, it is good to see some support being given in terms of training, etc.

However, these roles all have a common theme running through in the real world. They either pay poorly relative to most other positions in the long run (e.g the caring professions), or they pay really poorly while someone is learning how to do the roles (i.e. many of the trades-related positions).

Naturally enough, many Canberrans ask around about their career options and make a rational decision to stay away from these roles on a financial basis; put bluntly, their time and effort is better rewarded elsewhere. For those who are brave enough to take these roles on, the casual and poorly paid nature of some of these jobs mean that few stay in these roles any longer than necessary.

So perhaps we need to re-think these policies in a broader sense;

1) If staff are simply gong to churn through these courses each year, maybe it would be better spending money to subsidise rents and/or living costs for our existing staff in these industries? If they can’t afford to live in Canberra on minimum wage, then is the problem really being fixed?

2) Much of this training inititiative appears to be aimed at school leavers, but there is nothing here for anyone already in the workforce looking to upgrade their skills. With large numbers of APS employees getting the sack, wouldn’t (for example) small business training be a useful thing to support?

Or what about the types of statistical/IT/coding skills required to make us a “smart city” beyond the government sector?

neanderthalsis 10:30 am 19 Dec 14

dungfungus said :

Seems likely to be a “good little earner” for CIT.
There is no guarantee the participants will be assured of a job though.

Typical of supply driven approaches to skills across the globe. Governments and a lot of NGOs just throw money into training and expect the jobs will magically be created to absorb them into the labour market after completion.

The NTEU will be happy as the bulk of the funds will go into propping up the inflexible and overly bureaucratic dinosaur that is CIT.

dungfungus 7:28 am 19 Dec 14

Seems likely to be a “good little earner” for CIT.
There is no guarantee the participants will be assured of a job though.

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