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A roadside memorials policy

By johnboy - 13 September 2010 40

The Chiefly Stanhope has announced a policy on roadside memorials which is also online.

Whether grieving bogans will take a blind bit of notice remains debateable. In our post christian era, stripped of time proven grief mechanisms, the new paganism of sacrificial offerings at the site of deaths is a powerful thing.

The policy is:

    • The ACT Government will allow roadside memorials to be placed in public areas it manages subject to the approval of the family and relatives of the deceased. Approval to allow roadside memorials on national land would be considered by the National Capital Authority, the responsible land manager.

    • Acknowledging that the death of a loved one as a result of a motor vehicle crash can be very traumatic, the ACT Government through Roads ACT will as required facilitate discussions between affected parties and provide advice in the nature of roadside memorials to be permitted.

    • The views of residents adjacent to any proposal roadside memorial should be sought and respected by those responsible for placing the memorials.

    • Should there be conflicting views between affected parties, Roads ACT will facilitate discussions and will identify a location and type of roadside memorial that takes into consideration the views raised within the overall policy position that the ACT Government will permit the installation of roadside memorial on public land it manages.

    • Roadside memorials can be placed at a location on a permanent basis subject to them being maintained in a tidy and aesthetic condition that poses no hazard to the public in the view of Roads ACT. The ACT Government will remove roadside memorials that pose a safety hazard or are not maintained. Roads ACT will endeavour to contact the relatives of the deceased person prior to the roadside memorial being removed unless it poses an urgent safety hazard to the public.

    • The ACT Government will also remove any signs or other fixtures that is considers insensitive or offensive.

    • In general, roadside memorials can consist of:
    — A small floral display and or ground plaque of durable materials such as stone, concrete or cast metals.
    — small structures no greater than 1.0m high, comprising timber; stone; concrete or metal installed in a manner that does not pose any safety hazard to the public in the views of Roads ACT.
    — Covering an area of no more than 4 square metres.

    • Impacts on underground services will need to be investigated and the person responsible for placing the roadside memorials are encouraged to discuss the details of the roadside memorials with Roads ACT in the first instance. Roads ACT will assist in identifying information on any underground services.

    • The initial point of contact for Roadside Memorials within Roads ACT will be the person performing the role of Director, Roads ACT who can be contacted by calling Canberra Connect on telephone number 13 12 81.

What’s Your opinion?


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40 Responses to
A roadside memorials policy
astrojax 1:20 pm 13 Sep 10

Rollersk8r said :

I’m completely against roadside memorials. There is a place especially for memorial sites, rememberance and grieving – it’s called a cemetery. I’ve had a couple of family members die unexpectedly, including my uncle of a heart attack at the gym, but nobody felt the need the place flowers or get a plaque made up for the site of their passing.

while i don’t disagree with your sentiment i also see a valid point that indications at the place on the road system where a fatality has occurred isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as a pertinent indicator to other road users of the possible consquences of cutting in, tailgating and being mully, etc… maybe some standard rta-approved (or whatever the equivalent here is) object..? maybe the chiefly stand-hopeful can commission some creative public art to be the single approved device?

dajala 1:19 pm 13 Sep 10

Rollersk8r, I’m against roadside memorials for much the same reasons.

However, I wouldn’t object to a large billboard positioned on each site with a photo of the deceased person that stated something along the lines of “I died here because I was an asshat who was drink driving/speeding/talking on my mobile” Don’t be like me.”

Roadside memorials generally celebrate the lives of people who died while putting the lives of other responsible individuals at risk. I don’t think you should be able to glorify the existence of a person if they died drink driving, speeding. etc.

Rollersk8r 12:05 pm 13 Sep 10

I’m completely against roadside memorials. There is a place especially for memorial sites, rememberance and grieving – it’s called a cemetery. I’ve had a couple of family members die unexpectedly, including my uncle of a heart attack at the gym, but nobody felt the need the place flowers or get a plaque made up for the site of their passing.

Skidbladnir 11:51 am 13 Sep 10

-small structures no greater than 1.0m high, comprising timber; stone; concrete or metal installed in a manner that does not pose any safety hazard to the public in the views of Roads ACT.
– Covering an area of no more than 4 square metres.

Jesus.
Have these people never heard of the Foundation Myth of Carthage?

Dido fled Tyre and eventually arrived in northeastern Tunisia. She sought land to establish a base, but finding that negotiations were not to her advantage, she reportedly played on the innocence of the local people by asking for a piece of land that was big enough to be enclosed by the edges of an ox hide. Thinking that this would be very small, the locals agreed. Then Elissa cut it into narrow strips, laid them end-to-end and formed a huge circle. She had created enough land inside the perimeter of the ox hide to build a city, and that city, which she named Carthage, was to become one of the most influential in the entire Mediterranean region for almost 700 years.

Beserk Keyboard Warr 11:28 am 13 Sep 10

troll-sniffer said :

Roadside memorials are bogan. No doubt about it, but I think someone in the ANU School of Inconsequential Studies needs to do a PhD on why they feel the need to publicly flaunt what is really a very private matter.

I think TBL would see it as the bogan’s need to somehow make up for the deceased bogan having never appeared on Family Fortune or Wheel of Feud etc. It is after all a bogan’s birthright to appear on trash TV at least once in their empty lives, and those who miss out must be compensated, and what better way than to trivialise the family’s self-absorbed grieving than setting up a permanent visible reminder of the futility of their bogan existence?

When I go I want to be remembered by famuily and friends for what I meant to them personally, not what they seek to advertise in a public place.

I’ve been pondering the same thing since I noticed a few giant “RIP Megan” and “RIP Mick” stickers on the back windows of various utes & Commodores around Canberra. Is it their way of bragging “I know a dead person, I’m a hard c**t”?

Skidd Marx 11:23 am 13 Sep 10

Is anyone else of the opinion that (along with minorities) lower class/bogan types are beyond reproach? It seemingly isn’t acceptable to say “no” to these people, hence the need for drawn out and expensive bureaucratic measure such as this.

troll-sniffer 11:14 am 13 Sep 10

Roadside memorials are bogan. No doubt about it, but I think someone in the ANU School of Inconsequential Studies needs to do a PhD on why they feel the need to publicly flaunt what is really a very private matter.

I think TBL would see it as the bogan’s need to somehow make up for the deceased bogan having never appeared on Family Fortune or Wheel of Feud etc. It is after all a bogan’s birthright to appear on trash TV at least once in their empty lives, and those who miss out must be compensated, and what better way than to trivialise the family’s self-absorbed grieving than setting up a permanent visible reminder of the futility of their bogan existence?

When I go I want to be remembered by famuily and friends for what I meant to them personally, not what they seek to advertise in a public place.

Thoroughly Smashed 10:48 am 13 Sep 10

Four square metres is pretty big. I propose a 2x2x1m stone monolith for my memorial when I go out in a fiery traffic accident. With a mag wheel embedded in it.

Me no fry 10:33 am 13 Sep 10

I’m waiting for someone to set up a hide near one of these roadside memorials, so that people can safely observe bogans conducting their rites, without fear of being pelted by empty RTD cans and half-eaten big macs.

shirty_bear 10:30 am 13 Sep 10

Not before time … there is a very small number of well-maintained memorials out there … and a truckload of dead, dried-up brown flowers taped to signposts. And a mag nailed to a tree – classy. Seems to sum up the calibre of individual playing this game.

UrbanAdventure.org 10:11 am 13 Sep 10

Hmm, I notice the other day that the Mully memorial has gained some sort of stone / concrete wheel. What’s the deal with that?

Thoroughly Smashed 10:08 am 13 Sep 10

I call dibs on the mag wheel.

p1 10:02 am 13 Sep 10

This doesn’t specifically address the use of Woodstock Burbon in such memorials.

Clown Killer 9:59 am 13 Sep 10

The ACT Government will also remove any signs or other fixtures that is considers insensitive or offensive

Would this include removing anything that commemorated the existence of a worm like Mully Williams?

Waiting For Godot 9:35 am 13 Sep 10

I thought bogans were using Facebook for their memorials nowadays. Oh no, hold on – the bogans are the ones defacing other memorial sites.

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