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Boxing for kids – a new ACT export?

By Gungahlin Al - 13 April 2011 23

Channel Ten News has had a story of a 10 year old girl participating in a boxing competition.

They report that New South Wales sets a minimum age of 14 for people of any sex to go boxing, so this kid (and presumably her parents) just trucked across into the ACT, where the minimum age is just 10, for her first competition bout.

So we’ve discovered a new export industry have we?

I’m pretty sure the medical fraternity would be queuing up to explain why boxing at such a young age is setting the kid up for lasting brain damage.

So Minister Corbell, why does the ACT warrant so much more lenient laws?

young boxers

What’s Your opinion?


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23 Responses to
Boxing for kids – a new ACT export?
matt31221 5:43 pm 13 Apr 11

housebound said :

That our nanny state would mandate bike helmets, ban smoking, fireworks, circuses (and anything else that’s fun), but allow children to give each other brain damage (and call it a sport) is beyond belief.

There has been studies done that (which I read personally at the AIS library) show amateur boxing to not cause brain damage providing safety rules are followed – it has been shown to increase hand eye coordination. Brain damage comes when a person is knocked out receiving concussion and then knocked out a second time while still recovering from the first KO. Amateur boxing is more about the skill and points than knocking a person unconscious. The same study showed significant brain damage in Professional boxers however, because they are not really about safety – the goal is to knock someone out cold, and they get KO’d, get up and get KO’d again. I hear the money is good in pro boxing though!

I child would receive more brain damage from AFL than amateur boxing.

walking by quietly 4:58 pm 13 Apr 11

p1 said :

walking by quietly said :

If this was Tae Kwon Do, Karate or Judo, would this be such an issue?
If you’ve spent anytime with kids at the standard suburban dance school, boxing starts to look a lot more civilised.

Do people run Tae Kwon Do, Karate or Judo competitions where you get points for punching the other kid in the head repeatedly?

The answer would be yes. Check the scoring system for Tae Kwon Do.

Davo111 3:15 pm 13 Apr 11

Pommy bastard said :

I’d rather my kids learned self defense skills in a controlled arena, than in the school yard, I have no desire to “helicopter parent” them..

Self defense isn’t the same as boxing. Boxing is a combat sport, with the goal to knock the opponent out. Self defense is a countermeasure to protect yourself against physical harm.

slightly off-topic: Self defense training for kids really isn’t required. I was able to avoid school yard fights without any training or hiding in the library. From what i saw people who did have “professional training” usually bragged about it and got in more fights as a result.

Pommy bastard 2:53 pm 13 Apr 11

I’d rather my kids learned self defense skills in a controlled arena, than in the school yard, I have no desire to “helicopter parent” them.

Boxing is good for the mind and body, the protective headgear they wear at that level is reasonably effective, and the bouts are very controlled.

Disinformation 2:33 pm 13 Apr 11

Davo111 said :

You only have to look at some of the current boxers try and string a sentence together to find out the ‘real’ effects of boxing.

Ah, but you’d have to assess if the lack of linguistic dexterity was caused by boxing, or caused boxing. It could just as easily cause football, mullyism or One Nation voting.

Davo111 1:50 pm 13 Apr 11

To be honest i’d say professional fights between people under 16 shouldn’t be allowed, training and sparring only. You only have to look at some of the current boxers try and string a sentence together to find out the ‘real’ effects of boxing.

p1 1:40 pm 13 Apr 11

walking by quietly said :

If this was Tae Kwon Do, Karate or Judo, would this be such an issue?
If you’ve spent anytime with kids at the standard suburban dance school, boxing starts to look a lot more civilised.

Do people run Tae Kwon Do, Karate or Judo competitions where you get points for punching the other kid in the head repeatedly?

georgesgenitals 1:14 pm 13 Apr 11

BimboGeek said :

If she wanted to learn karate it would be cute. How can we legislate that some martial arts are good and others are bad? My instinct is to assess whether the point is attack or defence, number and severity of injuries and if available long term health projections. But. It’s easier to say “boxing is bad” so the issue gets confused.

You don’t see too many kids doing full contact martial arts. The whole point is the learning.

walking by quietly 1:03 pm 13 Apr 11

If this was Tae Kwon Do, Karate or Judo, would this be such an issue?
If you’ve spent anytime with kids at the standard suburban dance school, boxing starts to look a lot more civilised.

BimboGeek 12:54 pm 13 Apr 11

If she wanted to learn karate it would be cute. How can we legislate that some martial arts are good and others are bad? My instinct is to assess whether the point is attack or defence, number and severity of injuries and if available long term health projections. But. It’s easier to say “boxing is bad” so the issue gets confused.

Special G 12:34 pm 13 Apr 11

She’s got some nice form. Kids aged 5 and 6 play rugby.

Chop71 11:16 am 13 Apr 11

yeah, bring back fireworks!!!

p1 10:41 am 13 Apr 11

housebound said :

That our nanny state would mandate bike helmets, ban smoking, fireworks, circuses (and anything else that’s fun), but allow children to give each other brain damage (and call it a sport) is beyond belief.

I agree. I’d be more then happy to ban boxing if it means I can have fireworks back.

housebound 10:31 am 13 Apr 11

That our nanny state would mandate bike helmets, ban smoking, fireworks, circuses (and anything else that’s fun), but allow children to give each other brain damage (and call it a sport) is beyond belief.

p1 9:58 am 13 Apr 11

It does raise interesting questions about the blurry lines between sport and violence. There are many things which can happen on the field or in the ring, between kids, which would clearly be child abuse in any other setting (even with limited protective equipment). Is it bad parenting to let your kid beat/be beaten by another and actively encourage it?

Although, the issue with boxing isn’t the individual hits to the head, but rather many thousand hits to the head over a long period of time.

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