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Cafes with fairtrade coffee

By Harmony - 17 September 2010 30

I’ve committed to drinking only fairtrade coffee, so I need to know which cafes in Canberra and surrounds are fairtrade certified. Two places I know:

    Chocolate Olive
    Colbee Court, Phillip, 8am-5pm Mon to Fri, 8am-2pm Sat
    Coffee is certified organic and certified fairtrade. Great range of salads – good vegetarian/vegan options, also lots of gluten free. Excellent prices and friendly service.

    Cafe Ink
    Woden Library, opens 7am Mon to Fri (I’m not sure about weekends)
    Cafe Ink’s main purpose is to provide disadvantaged people with a supportive environment to increase their social and economic participation through paid employment. The vibe is laid-back and friendly. Serves fairtrade coffee and has a range of other fairtrade products, organic juices and simple fresh local food. (Great raisin toast – fruit bread supplied by Hughes Bakery.) Grab the paper or a book from the library and sit back and chill for awhile.

Who serves decent Fairtrade coffee in Civic and elsewhere in Canberra?

What’s Your opinion?


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30 Responses to
Cafes with fairtrade coffee
Inappropriate 3:17 pm 18 Sep 10

sepi said :

Vegatables – most people who are worried about ethics or health buy local and / or organic, so no sweatshops involved.

Organic food is no more ethical or healthier than efficiently grown vegies. They’re all grown by the same people.

sepi 2:08 pm 18 Sep 10

How can buying fairtrade possibly be the wrong thing to do.
If everyone did it, conditions would improve.

You have to start somewhere – coffee is as good a place to start as any.
Boycotting unethical products does work. Nestle have finally stopped using palm oil, and thus contributing to the extinction of orangutans), due to publicity and boycotts.
Are we allowed to feel good about that, or is there some cynical reason not to?

Vegatables – most people who are worried about ethics or health buy local and / or organic, so no sweatshops involved.

Textiles unfortunately are unavailable as ethical products, except for the very very well off.
(There is a great song about this – ‘whose blood on your shirt’)

Deref 12:28 pm 18 Sep 10

Jethro said :

The number one thing loved by white people.

LOL

georgesgenitals 11:18 am 18 Sep 10

Waiting For Godot said :

georgesgenitals said :

I’m currently on the opposite side of the planet to Canberra, and came across something very interesting in a shop the other day: fair trade ivory!

How about a fairtrade fur coat?

Didn’t see one, although that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. There’s no fur being worn where I am, though, it’s way too hot.

Waiting For Godot 11:07 am 18 Sep 10

georgesgenitals said :

I’m currently on the opposite side of the planet to Canberra, and came across something very interesting in a shop the other day: fair trade ivory!

How about a fairtrade fur coat?

Pommy bastard 10:32 am 18 Sep 10

The “Fairtrade” hippies are really cruel.

By only buying “Fairtade”, (extra middle-class, white-guilt, style luxury blend) they are denying sweatshop labourers the ability to earn what little pittance they get.

astrojax 8:21 am 18 Sep 10

the cafe in the john gorton bldg – housing finance and environment offices – offers it as an option, i noticed the other day. i also think satis, at downer shops, also has fair trade; and excellent breakfasts

i prefer a well made coffee more than worrying about its provenance.

georgesgenitals 6:49 am 18 Sep 10

I’m currently on the opposite side of the planet to Canberra, and came across something very interesting in a shop the other day: fair trade ivory!

JC 3:05 am 18 Sep 10

Do you know what fairtade really means and how it impacts the world? Bit like organic, makes people feel really good about themselves as they are “doing something” for the world, but at the end of the day it isn’t sustainable.

Morgan 10:57 pm 17 Sep 10

Yeah I totally know what you mean, I just want to be a part of the solution and not part of the problem.

gospeedygo 10:12 pm 17 Sep 10

Aw cmon’. Everyone knows the sweat of exploited workers is what makes really good coffee.

urchin 9:25 pm 17 Sep 10

erm, mcdonald’s apparently serves fair trade coffee, though that might not satisfy the coffee snob within…

one wonders if people are equally particular when it comes to fair trade textiles, vegetables, electronics and so on. not to diminish a person’s charitable sentiments, but the cynical part of me wonders how much of fair trade is bona fide and how much of it is a marketing gimmick…

BimboGeek 8:35 pm 17 Sep 10

As Nature Intended always used to do the organic/fairtrade coffee, I assume this is still the case.

My Rainbow Dreams also does an organic coffee, it may well be fairtrade given their ethical concerns.

KaleenOutback 7:22 pm 17 Sep 10

Fairtrade coffee mandates inefficient labour practices and encourages overproduction of otherwise unproductive cash crops. And they’re a pretty inefficent way of providing aid to poor people.

Way to subjugate the brown man, OP!

Jethro 5:58 pm 17 Sep 10

The number one thing loved by white people.

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