Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Excellence in Public Sector consulting

Corporate Notification?????

By RaTTyRaTT - 5 December 2012 29

Hey all.

Okay, before i say anything more, I am not going out of my way to be a d%*k about this, but I am genuinely interested in knowing a way forward. 🙂

My company received a notice from Victoria Police for a Corporate Notification – requesting we supply the details about a driver of a car registered to my company. The car in question had just been picked up (brand new) the prior week in Sydney, and driven to Melbourne for work. The person driving it had noted a discrepancy in the vehicle speedometer – vs the GPS which indicated the vehicle was ‘out’ a bit.

On it’s return, and the report was made of the speedometer, I checked and had the vehicle’s tyres replaced (note, this was BRAND NEW) and in the process adjusted the type of tyre (diameter, etc…) with a confirmation check that it was ‘correct’ against both the GPS and the speedo.

After that, we got a notification of infringement against the vehicle – with a request for identification of the driver.

The irritating thing is that the infringement lists: PERMITTED SPEED = 60 km/h – ALLEGED SPEED: 64 km/h – DETECTED SPEED: 67 km/h.

Now, while I did not note how far out the speedometer by the driver, I suspect it was about 2-3km overall.

So this puts a dilemma to me, as should I allow the driver (an employee) cop it for a vehicle that had a incorrect speedometer? Or do we just let him cop it – and identify him. Also, will anyone down there (with their reputation, doubtful) care if we explain the above anyway?

I am genuinely interested as I haven’t seen this situation before, and would be keen to know – at least I will be making a company policy (in writing) for the future on it. I don’t want to go asking lawyers and stuff – it’s one of those things that seems ‘almost’ pointless.

On a side note, the letter seems to be rather nasty about if we don’t identify the driver, that we will have to pay. This has me rather puzzled also – since we are an ACT registered company, not Victorian. I am wondering (as a side point) how they are going to do that? send us a bill? What if we don’t pay it? Hmm, questions questions… Will they ask the AFP to come and enforce it on us ??? I would be interested to know that…

Note, there is nothing to pay on this – it’s simply a corporate notification, so even if we wanted to just pay it for the employee – we couldn’t.

Seriously wondering..

R

What’s Your opinion?


Please login to post your comments, or connect with
29 Responses to
Corporate Notification?????
Filter
Showing only Website comments
Order
Newest to Oldest
Oldest to Newst
KB1971 8:08 am 17 Dec 12

Lookout Smithers said :

KeenGolfer said :

Lookout Smithers said :

But then I am confused about why you put new tyres put on it? I am not sure how that would affect a speed of a vehicle?

It does because it changes the rolling diameter. Going from bald tyres to new, or a different tyre profile or changing wheel size all has an effect on the speedo, and it can make a considerable difference.

Bigger tyres does, new tires wouldn’t unless they were

KeenGolfer said :

Lookout Smithers said :

But then I am confused about why you put new tyres put on it? I am not sure how that would affect a speed of a vehicle?

It does because it changes the rolling diameter. Going from bald tyres to new, or a different tyre profile or changing wheel size all has an effect on the speedo, and it can make a considerable difference.

But if it was a new car and the tyres were replaced with a different size tyre and then tested as correct and accurate, wouldn’t that mean the tyres fitted before were wrong? I might not understand this fully.

Not necessarily as there is quite a large tolerance in the ADR. What we have not found out yet is if this tolerance was outside the allowance which I suspect it wasn’t as the OP has not answered my question.

Lookout Smithers 8:11 pm 16 Dec 12

KeenGolfer said :

Lookout Smithers said :

But then I am confused about why you put new tyres put on it? I am not sure how that would affect a speed of a vehicle?

It does because it changes the rolling diameter. Going from bald tyres to new, or a different tyre profile or changing wheel size all has an effect on the speedo, and it can make a considerable difference.

Bigger tyres does, new tires wouldn’t unless they were

KeenGolfer said :

Lookout Smithers said :

But then I am confused about why you put new tyres put on it? I am not sure how that would affect a speed of a vehicle?

It does because it changes the rolling diameter. Going from bald tyres to new, or a different tyre profile or changing wheel size all has an effect on the speedo, and it can make a considerable difference.

But if it was a new car and the tyres were replaced with a different size tyre and then tested as correct and accurate, wouldn’t that mean the tyres fitted before were wrong? I might not understand this fully.

Henry82 12:54 am 08 Dec 12

Either way your employee broke the speed limit, with or without the included speedo “error”. Tell them, then direct the fine their way

KB1971 6:26 pm 07 Dec 12

KB1971 said :

davo101 said :

KB1971 said :

Just going around corners does make a difference, I use Strava to track my riding …..So, I don’t trust GPS for absolute accuracy at all.

I think you are confusing calculating distance travelled by GPS and measuring velocity. GPS’s punch out a solution once a second (or more often in some) of where the receiver is and how fast it is moving. The position is usually claimed to be accurate to with 15m but the velocity is 0.1m/s.

Nope, I understand how it works. Just giving my experience on how I get different readings with all the stats on the GPS every time I ride even on set routes. The only thing that varies on my physical speedometer is the time it takes me to get there.

I guess I am saying that there is no way of calibrating a GPS unit considering all the other factors involved that cannot be calibrated at the same time such as sattelites, cloud cover, magnetic interference in the signal, shielding from vegetation/mountains ect. Unless you had access to NASA…………

I just re-read my original post again & realized that I did not mention velocity. The average speed and actual time traveled is usually different between my GPS and the speedo. Same as in group rides, every body gets a different time.

KB1971 6:23 pm 07 Dec 12

davo101 said :

KB1971 said :

Just going around corners does make a difference, I use Strava to track my riding …..So, I don’t trust GPS for absolute accuracy at all.

I think you are confusing calculating distance travelled by GPS and measuring velocity. GPS’s punch out a solution once a second (or more often in some) of where the receiver is and how fast it is moving. The position is usually claimed to be accurate to with 15m but the velocity is 0.1m/s.

Nope, I understand how it works. Just giving my experience on how I get different readings with all the stats on the GPS every time I ride even on set routes. The only thing that varies on my physical speedometer is the time it takes me to get there.

I guess I am saying that there is no way of calibrating a GPS unit considering all the other factors involved that cannot be calibrated at the same time such as sattelites, cloud cover, magnetic interference in the signal, shielding from vegetation/mountains ect. Unless you had access to NASA…………

KeenGolfer 5:26 pm 07 Dec 12

Lookout Smithers said :

But then I am confused about why you put new tyres put on it? I am not sure how that would affect a speed of a vehicle?

It does because it changes the rolling diameter. Going from bald tyres to new, or a different tyre profile or changing wheel size all has an effect on the speedo, and it can make a considerable difference.

davo101 2:34 pm 07 Dec 12

KB1971 said :

Just going around corners does make a difference, I use Strava to track my riding …..So, I don’t trust GPS for absolute accuracy at all.

I think you are confusing calculating distance travelled by GPS and measuring velocity. GPS’s punch out a solution once a second (or more often in some) of where the receiver is and how fast it is moving. The position is usually claimed to be accurate to with 15m but the velocity is 0.1m/s.

KB1971 12:44 pm 07 Dec 12

davo101 said :

Charlie57 said :

Using a GPS to test the speedo isn’t fool-proof either, as commercial GPS isn’t accurate enough. If weather conditions were good on a straight stretch of road, GPS would probably give a pretty accurate average speed. As soon as the road bends significantly though the speed will show as slowing down (velocity = distance/time)

I think most GPS’s calculate speed based on the carrier phase data ie: they don’t just use where we are now and where we were just a moment ago, so going round bends wont have an effect. What does have an effect is the filtering that is applied to what’s displayed, so as you speed up or slow down the displayed speed will lag behind. From many a boring trip in the cruise controlled work vehicle we’ve discovered that, different GPS receivers give the same speed reading and timing over the various odometer checks usually confirms the GPS is within 0.5 km/h.

Just going around corners does make a difference, I use Strava to track my riding and a Garmin GPS Map 62S, so a reasonably good GPS. When I go to Sparrrow Hill riding there is always a 2km difference between the posted distance of the loop, my speedometer on the bike and the GPS.

The loop is 27km and the GPS always reads 25. If there is a tight set of switchbacks it will not pick up all the distance traveled, it will cut across sections. It also does not follow the exact path of the tracks/roads. It close but no banana.

If I do the loop in a group, the distances and elevations are always different between riders, some times by a km.

On my commute, there is always a slight difference in distance and elevation and that is using the same device every time.

So, I don’t trust GPS for absolute accuracy at all.

What I forgot to mention previously is that all equipment has an uncertainty of measurement (tolerance). So, if the rolling road has a tolerance of + or – 2km/h and the speedo has a tolerance of + or – 2km/h then there is a potential 4km/h inaccuracy there. However, this inaccuracy is usually allowable by the standards the vehicle has to meet.

davo101 12:09 pm 07 Dec 12

Charlie57 said :

Using a GPS to test the speedo isn’t fool-proof either, as commercial GPS isn’t accurate enough. If weather conditions were good on a straight stretch of road, GPS would probably give a pretty accurate average speed. As soon as the road bends significantly though the speed will show as slowing down (velocity = distance/time)

I think most GPS’s calculate speed based on the carrier phase data ie: they don’t just use where we are now and where we were just a moment ago, so going round bends wont have an effect. What does have an effect is the filtering that is applied to what’s displayed, so as you speed up or slow down the displayed speed will lag behind. From many a boring trip in the cruise controlled work vehicle we’ve discovered that, different GPS receivers give the same speed reading and timing over the various odometer checks usually confirms the GPS is within 0.5 km/h.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2018 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site