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Do you expect police to prevent crime, or just watch?

By IrishPete - 18 May 2013 43

The CT reports that police watched a house being burgled and did not intervene. No doubt they will say there was some bigger picture, but this may be little consolation to the cancer patient and their family, whose circumstances were used to tug at our heart strings.

When you can’t rely on police to protect your house, maybe it IS time to get that vicious neighbour-eating Rotty, or a shotty booby trap.

IP

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43 Responses to
Do you expect police to prevent crime, or just watch?
Henry82 7:24 pm 18 May 13

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Disclaimer: I no longer work in the security screen industry( nice cushy office job now lol), but I do know how effective these type of screens are, especially clearshield ones..

Are they? Wouldn’t a thief just use a crowbar and jimmy the door open? (instead of “smashing” the screen as the advertisement entails). I for one like the idea of the thief cutting himself of the broken glass on a standard window.

milkman 6:38 pm 18 May 13

Why didn’t the cops enter the house and arrest them, red-handed?

schmeah 6:03 pm 18 May 13

I’m no cop apologist, but I don’t know what the problem is – one of the scum bags was being surveilled and in the course of this was observed breaking and entering. Had the police approached the scum whilst knocking on doors, I’m sure their defence would have been “we were just seeing if anyone needed their lawn mowed” (as happened to me many moons ago when I found some scum peering through my front door) and the operation, whatever it was for, would have been compromised.

By waiting, they were able to apprehend said scum and probably have the photos to prove their crime – and the victim(s) got all their goods back.

Plodder 5:52 pm 18 May 13

There’s no way of knowing what a defence lawyer may, or may not, try to do do re the burglary offence as we don’t know what evidence the police have, what if any admissions the suspects made and so on. That said If the stolen commodore was started with keys from inside the house then the crooks have a problem they may find it quite difficult to get over. Not to mention the property stolen from the house located in their possession in very close time proximity to the offence – circumstantial but compelling. For some people it’s just impossible to admit that the police have done a good job.

IrishPete 5:34 pm 18 May 13

Plodder said :

It would be informative (although probably not interesting) to know when IP thinks the police should have acted.

I am guessing the police actually lost sight of them.

As it is, they have caught them “red handed” in a stolen car with stolen property. Evidence of burglary is circumstantial because they did not see them on the premises, never mind apprehend them on the premises. A decent lawyer will rip holes in the burglary charge, unless it turns out police did see them on the premises, in which case they should have arrested them on the premises.

Police were able to follow two separate cars away from the scene, so they weren’t short-handed,

Yes, I do give them credit for not pursuing, and just following, though that was no guarantee that they wouldn’t be hooning in the stolen car.

Stolen car and stolen property probably won’t even get them a custodial sentence in the ACT, unless they have a huge criminal history..Perhaps they were expecting them to go on and do something more serious with the stolen car.

But I restate my original point – the victims of the burglary seem not to have featured highly in the police decision-making.

IP

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 4:54 pm 18 May 13

Another reason to have clearshield or crimsafe screens and doors installed.

Disclaimer: I no longer work in the security screen industry( nice cushy office job now lol), but I do know how effective these type of screens are, especially clearshield ones.

A great investment that makes it near impossible for scum like these to break in.

OT, it may seem a crappy thing to let them actually break in and leave, but if they acted straight away, then what charges could be brought against the scum, and even then, what sort of punishment would be applied? I’m guessing a big zero. At least now their is a few charges that can be laid.

Also, I’d be questioning anybody currently hiring small brick laying company’s who have 18 year old looking labourers…

threepaws 4:13 pm 18 May 13

IrishPete said :

If they damaged the house getting in, or just for kicks, then getting the “stuff” back may not be a huge consolation. Burglars have been known to do a lot of damage, including defecating and urinating in places they shouldn’t. Many people who have been burgled never feel safe again in their home, and move at great expense.

If police were “protecting the house” then they failed miserably. Did police know there was no-one at home to be directly traumatised by the burglars, threatened or maybe assaulted? No, they didn’t. Just cos you don’t answer your door doesn’t mean you’re not at home.

And what if they’d gone joyriding in the stolen car and done something really serious in the process, like killing a pedestrian?

Perhaps RiotACT could seek comment from ACT Policing?

IP

Why don’t you go right ahead and seek comment from ACT policing. Can’t wait to hear their response.

What exactly do you want from the police? a) they had the scumbags under surveillance in the first place b) they arrested them on a number of charges, red handed c) scumbags were both remanded. Seriously – what more do you want?

I can just picture it now, police following the scumbags into the house: “I was just looking for my dog your honour”, “I thought I heard someone crying out for help your honour” – scumbags walk free laughing at the police and court, free to go and keep knocking on doors and burglarising other houses.

Aeek 3:51 pm 18 May 13

pepmeup said :

Don’t police basically just take care if traffic infringements in Canberra.

They seem to spend most of their budget on media, doesn’t leave much for doing anything.

Plodder 3:47 pm 18 May 13

Conducting a surveillance operation in suburban streets on criminals who are actually in the process of doing badness and are therefore hyper-alert is extremely difficult. The fact police managed to identify the crooks and maintain observations well enough to see them leaving the house that was burgled without being compromised is excellent work. That they were able to do so and collect the evidence needed to charge the suspects is even better. On top of that the officers involved didn’t try and stop the offenders while they were driving – which may have led to a pursuit with all the associated hazards that entails – instead they continued to follow them until an arrest could be made safely.

In a perfect world perhaps the police could have arrested the suspects when they saw them knocking on doors but I think we all know how that would play out in the courts here. I also note that nowhere in the CT article does it suggest that police actually saw the suspects breaking in to the house they eventually burgled. Going to my earlier comment re surveillance ops I would not be surprised if the police didn’t see the burglary happen and therefore could not know for certain that an offence had occurred. In that situation surely the correct option is to continue to observe and wait until definite evidence of an offence is located. In this case that was probably when they saw the suspects driving the stolen commodore – and again the police acted properly by not immediately moving to make an arrest as that could have led to a pursuit.

It would be informative (although probably not interesting) to know when IP thinks the police should have acted.

pepmeup 3:26 pm 18 May 13

I expect police to do nothing other than give you a report number for your insurance. Don’t police basically just take care if traffic infringements in Canberra.

Aeek 3:17 pm 18 May 13

Maybe I wrong them. I can’t see how just watching and doing nothing would improve their statistics.

IrishPete 3:08 pm 18 May 13

If they damaged the house getting in, or just for kicks, then getting the “stuff” back may not be a huge consolation. Burglars have been known to do a lot of damage, including defecating and urinating in places they shouldn’t. Many people who have been burgled never feel safe again in their home, and move at great expense.

If police were “protecting the house” then they failed miserably. Did police know there was no-one at home to be directly traumatised by the burglars, threatened or maybe assaulted? No, they didn’t. Just cos you don’t answer your door doesn’t mean you’re not at home.

And what if they’d gone joyriding in the stolen car and done something really serious in the process, like killing a pedestrian?

Perhaps RiotACT could seek comment from ACT Policing?

IP

buzz819 12:46 pm 18 May 13

Wouldn’t finding out who they are selling the stolen goods to also be of concern, like going after drug dealers to get rid of drugs, shutting down the sale of stolen property will slow down burglaries??

threepaws 11:58 am 18 May 13

You can’t arrest someone for knocking on doors. It’s not like they were watching a vicious assault and didn’t intervene, let’s remember it was ‘stuff’ that was no doubt recovered.

You can arrest someone for grabbing some stuff and making off with it. Presumably the police needed the crime to be committed before arresting them for it.

Let’s not leave any room for defence lawyers to get them off now…

Seems clear to me that the police were in fact protecting the house (or any house that these scumbags decide to enter).

bundah 11:27 am 18 May 13

This is a tricky one for to effectively arrest them immediately after they had broken into the house they would have needed a number of plod to prevent them escaping.So perhaps their M.O. was the appropriate thing to do given the circumstances?

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