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Footpath stoush with cyclist

By JazzyJess 27 March 2012 79

I was walking along a footpath in Ainslie this morning (Wise Street) and a cyclist coming up behind me shouted at me to get out of her way. I was a bit startled and jumped onto the grass verge when it occurred to me that I had right of way.

As she rode past me I shouted that she should be riding on the road and not the footpath.

She yelled back that she was allowed to and that I needed to learn the rules. I checked the TAMS website and cyclists are indeed permitted on footpaths but they must give way to pedestrians: http://www.tams.act.gov.au/move/cycling/cycling_and_walking_map/road_rules.

What do people think? Was she out of line? Am I being a princess?

Note that I have nothing against cyclists but feel it would have been easier for her to go around me (on the verge) than expect me to move.

What’s Your opinion?


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Footpath stoush with cyclist
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matt31221 4:23 pm 03 Apr 12

People need to learn that they won’t get everything their own way if they use anger and carry on like bananas. My advice is, if the cyclist is friendly and courteous or even neutral step aside for them. If they are rude, threatening or angry, do not comply with their wishes and try to hinder them if possible. You can apply this principle to almost everything in life when someone wants something of you. I always do.

HenryBG 3:50 pm 03 Apr 12

Jim Jones said :

HenryBG said :

Jim Jones said :

HenryBG said :

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

I’ve seen that situation a couple of times.

As a general rule I consider drivers who stop on pedestrian crossings or in the middle of intersections utter idiots, EXCEPT, if in doing so they manage to impede and upset a cycling fundamentalist, in which case I wholeheartedly applaud their positioning.

So you *like* people who obstruct others?

What a cock.

No, just people who obstruct cocks.

So you admit it, you’re a cockblocker.

I was going to beg you not to acccuse me of being an ocker cockblocker, but I don’t want this to turn into a Dr Seuss story.

Jim Jones 2:52 pm 03 Apr 12

HenryBG said :

Jim Jones said :

HenryBG said :

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

I’ve seen that situation a couple of times.

As a general rule I consider drivers who stop on pedestrian crossings or in the middle of intersections utter idiots, EXCEPT, if in doing so they manage to impede and upset a cycling fundamentalist, in which case I wholeheartedly applaud their positioning.

So you *like* people who obstruct others?

What a cock.

No, just people who obstruct cocks.

So you admit it, you’re a cockblocker.

HenryBG 2:47 pm 03 Apr 12

Jim Jones said :

HenryBG said :

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

I’ve seen that situation a couple of times.

As a general rule I consider drivers who stop on pedestrian crossings or in the middle of intersections utter idiots, EXCEPT, if in doing so they manage to impede and upset a cycling fundamentalist, in which case I wholeheartedly applaud their positioning.

So you *like* people who obstruct others?

What a cock.

No, just people who obstruct cocks.

Jim Jones 2:41 pm 03 Apr 12

HenryBG said :

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

I’ve seen that situation a couple of times.

As a general rule I consider drivers who stop on pedestrian crossings or in the middle of intersections utter idiots, EXCEPT, if in doing so they manage to impede and upset a cycling fundamentalist, in which case I wholeheartedly applaud their positioning.

So you *like* people who obstruct others?

What a cock.

Jim Jones 2:24 pm 03 Apr 12

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

Meaning that the cyclist obviously couldn’t get across even if s/he had dismounted – and yet somehow this is some sort of precautionary tale?

HenryBG 2:11 pm 03 Apr 12

Innovation said :

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

I’ve seen that situation a couple of times.

As a general rule I consider drivers who stop on pedestrian crossings or in the middle of intersections utter idiots, EXCEPT, if in doing so they manage to impede and upset a cycling fundamentalist, in which case I wholeheartedly applaud their positioning.

Wallly1972 1:33 pm 03 Apr 12

Innovation said :

I usually ring the bell gently from a good distance and then harder a second time if pedestrians haven’t heard me.

+1
IMHO the key is alerting people early enough so they have time to react, rather than the method or how fast you’re going etc.
But sometimes no matter how early and obvious I am there are some people that seem alarmed when I pass (riding or jogging)!

Sandman said :

From what I see it’s not the mode of transportation that makes the wankers.
I reckon it’s a combination of ignorance, self-centeredness and vitriol.

Innovation 12:14 pm 03 Apr 12

xman said :

patrick_keogh said :

The debate about the value of ringing your bell versus a verbal warning will probably never be finally resolved, however, FWIW here is my experience. I have been riding on Canberra’s roads and paths since the early 1970s. Sometimes I am riding fast, sometimes slow. I find that a verbal warning, normally “bike behind you” from as far back as I think it can be heard is most reliably acted on. As someone else observed, a significant fraction of pedestrians will veer to the right when you ring a bell behind them. My guess is that the little “ting” of a bell when heard from behind is hard to place in terms of direction, distance and speed, hence the turning around to identify the hazard…….

+1

A simple “Bike behind, passing on your right” always works for me. Even works for the iPod-people. Bells, not so much.

I usually ring the bell gently from a good distance and then harder a second time if pedestrians haven’t heard me. Interestingly, I used the bell gently on a very wide footpath near the NLA a few days ago, I was about 10 metres behind, almost walking pace and said thank you as I went past but the two pedestrians that had been taking up the whole width of the path stopped and looked quite angry with me. I’m pretty sure it wasn’t my imagination.

Innovation 12:07 pm 03 Apr 12

I had to have a chuckle yesterday. A car had stopped on top of a pedestrian crossing (in a queue of cars) and the cyclist was trying to ride across it. I couldn’t hear the exchange but I could tell that the cyclist gave the driver a filthy look. Given that cyclists aren’t supposed to ride across pedestrian crossings they were both in the wrong.

It’s funny how some people can’t reflect on their own actions once in a while.

markconley 10:38 am 03 Apr 12

Jess, apart form telling her she should have been riding on the road you were 100% correct and good on you.
holden caulfield and Gfresh excellent posts;
moving off the path can be just as difficult / dangerous for a civilian1
when i walk around the lake on the shared path i always take a bag and “pick upperer” (so i don’t have to bend) which is made of metal and i always carry it in my right hand
i like the ‘motorists must keep at least 1 metre from a cyclist’ and apply it to ‘cyclists must keep at least 1 metre from a pedestrian’
i once took a baseball bat for a walk along yamba drive between wisdom street and the hospital as a cyclist had shouted abuse at my wife the previous night, i walked for an hour and a half and never had any problems all the cyclist moved off the path where it’s narrow like THEY SHOULD, mark

phenderson 11:40 am 31 Mar 12

KB1971 said :

phenderson said :

Cyclists… Beware i’m about to stereotype. They all wear lycra for no particualr reason. (If you are going to correct me by saying it’s to make them more streamline, please….) They clomp around the cafes and move all the tables together so the rest of us are forced to navigate our way through the maze of helmets and sweaty lycra!

Bike riders should have more respect to other users on the walk/ride raths. They dont pay tax, they are unlicenced and in my opinion, should have to pay a small registration fee. It’s only fair! I have no time for Cyclists. Get the f*#k outta my way….

That is all…..

Someone kick you out from under the bridge?

Yep, a cyclist!

buzz819 3:17 pm 29 Mar 12

NsEs said :

So look like no one cares about the law?
http://www.tams.act.gov.au/move/cycling/cycling_and_walking_map/road_rules

What are you trying to say?

Everyone has discussed the law throughout the thread.

Funky1 2:07 pm 29 Mar 12

Everyone’s seemed to have overlooked the obvious solution here.

All pedestrians should just stay off the footpath at ALL times just in case a cyclist want to use it and ride past you. SIMPLE

😛

NsEs 1:48 pm 29 Mar 12
astrojax 1:15 pm 29 Mar 12

this would never happen if we got a monorail…

kennardly 12:33 pm 29 Mar 12

the ultimate lunacy in this department is when 1000’s of people are walking up the bikepath from Dryandra St to a Raiders or Brumbies game and inevitably someone comes along on their high horse (or mountain bike in this case) and rings the bell for everyone to get off the path and then swears and shakes their head the whole way up.

Used to be 1000’s anyway, not so much anymore…

sepi 1:17 pm 28 Mar 12

Holden Caulfield said :

Don’t reckon it’s a big deal. The cyclist lady probably just needs to get laid.

Sadly, it’s a rare day where one doesn’t encounter at least one unreasonable prick.

I guess she is still waiting for a reasonable one…..

Sandman 9:33 am 28 Mar 12

I’m only an occasional cycle user but I don’t “expect” anyone to get off the path for me. I ride a bike with tyres large enough to handle nature strip excursions and if there’s no room to pass then I slow down till there is.

From what I see it’s not the mode of transportation that makes the wankers. That affliction seems to cover the entire demographic in one way or another. I’m particularly fond of the cyclists who stop at the Cowper street lights where the bike path crosses over and they press the button then lean against the pole with their bike straddling the entire width of the path (no way around because of the fence around the stormwater bridge). They then stare at you as you approach (not intending to cross the road) with a pram containing a sleeping baby and make no effort to move out of your way unless you ask them to.

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