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GoGet, Popcar car-sharing trial for ACT

By Charlotte Harper 18 April 2016 61

Car share announcement - Meegan Fitzharris

Two car-sharing companies, GoGet and Popcar, will provide Canberrans with access to small fleets of their vehicles as part of a two-year trial of the transport option.

Car sharing works by having a fleet of cars available to be booked at any time, day or night, with customers paying a fee determined by how far they drive and how long they hire the car.

Members of the program will be able to find cars near them and making bookings via mobile apps or online booking systems at www.goget.com.au or popcar.com.au.

The commitment to car sharing is part of the ACT Labor-Greens Parliamentary Agreement.

ACT Minister for Transport and Municipal Services Meegan Fitzharris said that by becoming a member of either service, Canberrans would be able to access a network of 22 cars parked in specially marked spaces around the ACT, including in Civic (ACT Magistrates Court car park and London Circuit/Constitution Avenue car park), Dickson (Challis Street), Russell and near the Treasury building in the Parliamentary Triangle.

“People can simply book for the hours they need, or for a full day,” Ms Fitzharris said.

“During the two-year trial membership to the service will be offered at an initially discounted rate, so I really encourage people to become a member and try it out.”

National Capital Authority chief executive Malcolm Snow endorsed the initiative and has contributed a number of car spaces on National Land for the short-term rental.

“The program has a number of environmental benefits for the ACT, as well as economic benefits for those who use it,” Mr Snow said.

“The car sharing program will use newer, more fuel-efficient cars, including hybrid vehicles. By encouraging sharing the same vehicle between a number of people, the program should encourage less car usage for individuals and fewer cars on the road. In turn this should mean less pollution and congestion on our roads.”


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GoGet, Popcar car-sharing trial for ACT
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rommeldog56 7:38 am 05 May 16

Lurker2913 said :

Alexandra Craig said :

I, for one, refuse to shop in Canberra City anymore as parking is too difficult and too expensive to procure.

Ditto here.
Free parking in Woden or Queanbeyan, without the traffic. Why would I go to the City?

Ditto here too. If u want to look at whats killing Civic, it’s the Canberra Centre, the cost of paid parking there and the commercial rents that business have to pay which preclude variety and smaller retailers.

wildturkeycanoe 7:13 am 05 May 16

rommeldog56 said :

Im not saying they dont. What im saying is the car dominated planning is what has placed us in the corner we are in now, a city that is terrible to get around on foot and caters only to experienced cyclists.

Would not the problem with getting around on foot be the lack of suitable/efficient connecting public transport services, the large expanses between city centers and the extreme climates of winter cold and summer heat? The landscape with its rolling hills doesn’t assist much either.
Cyclists certainly shouldn’t complain, there are paths all over this town joining suburb to suburb and now they legally get a whole lane’s worth of the roadway as their own as well. The only thing that would improve the cycling experience is to entirely stop cars driving on the roads, install walls and roofs to prevent them getting cold and wet.

dungfungus 6:25 pm 04 May 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Alexandra Craig said :

I, for one, refuse to shop in Canberra City anymore as parking is too difficult and too expensive to procure.

Certainly, especially when you can get the exact same retailers at the next closest Westfield that has free parking. The problem there is Canberra Centre doesnt offer anything unique enough to make people want to be there, unless you need a trip to the Apple Store or shop high end retail, in which case you can probably afford the parking.

I buy my F & V at the local shops.

reddy84 12:42 pm 04 May 16

Alexandra Craig said :

I, for one, refuse to shop in Canberra City anymore as parking is too difficult and too expensive to procure.

Certainly, especially when you can get the exact same retailers at the next closest Westfield that has free parking. The problem there is Canberra Centre doesnt offer anything unique enough to make people want to be there, unless you need a trip to the Apple Store or shop high end retail, in which case you can probably afford the parking.

HenryBG 11:12 am 04 May 16

Alexandra Craig said :

I, for one, refuse to shop in Canberra City anymore as parking is too difficult and too expensive to procure.

Ditto here.
Free parking in Woden or Queanbeyan, without the traffic. Why would I go to the City?

dungfungus 8:00 am 04 May 16

rommeldog56 said :

gooterz said :

While you may say my comment about Canberra’s road planning compared to other gridlocked cities being successful is just opinion, I am sure if you ran a poll there would be overwhelming agreement that our roads handle traffic well.

Im not saying they dont. What im saying is the car dominated planning is what has placed us in the corner we are in now, a city that is terrible to get around on foot and caters only to experienced cyclists. Other jurisdictions have realised the folly in designing car-centric cities and are moving to slow traffic down to create safer environments for pedestrians and cyclists. In fact, there have been large economic benefit for retailers in areas where cars have been reduced or prohibited.

“In fact, there have been large economic benefit for retailers in areas where cars have been reduced or prohibited.”
They may be, but I think the dominant outcome is that retailers have suffered when nearby parking has been prohibited or reduces.
I, for one, refuse to shop in Canberra City anymore as parking is too difficult and too expensive to procure.

reddy84 8:39 am 03 May 16

gooterz said :

While you may say my comment about Canberra’s road planning compared to other gridlocked cities being successful is just opinion, I am sure if you ran a poll there would be overwhelming agreement that our roads handle traffic well.

Im not saying they dont. What im saying is the car dominated planning is what has placed us in the corner we are in now, a city that is terrible to get around on foot and caters only to experienced cyclists. Other jurisdictions have realised the folly in designing car-centric cities and are moving to slow traffic down to create safer environments for pedestrians and cyclists. In fact, there have been large economic benefit for retailers in areas where cars have been reduced or prohibited.

dungfungus 5:54 pm 02 May 16

Mysteryman said :

Acton said :

“……..people who would prefer not to own cars, but have an occasional need for them………”
I thought Uber had solved that problem. There have always been taxis as well.
BTW, I haven’t heard any “get rich quick” stories about those Uber besotted operators that were featured in the media a few months ago.

Uber and taxis are designed purely for point to point travel. Share cars are designed for those who require a flexible itinerary, each have their market.

There is not point in arguing against this service, we are shifting ever more to a share economy and that is the future.

On your comment on Canberra being planned for cars, you will find that every city that was planned during the 50s and 60s was designed for cars and you will find they all successfully cater to them. What sets Canberra apart is that our roads are designed for higher volumes and higher speeds than what is currently needed. That is due to an overly risk adverse government who cater for those idiotic minorities who want to travel at 70 or 80 in a 50km zone. Living in Belconnen area, I am flabbergasted at the width of our road reserves, you can fit 4 lanes where there are 2 in some places. This is to the detriment of the pedestrian experience and is a reason we have an increasing obesity issue. We should be reducing road widths, widening pedestrian footpaths and slowing down traffic to improve pedestrian and cycle access in our suburbs. To call Canberra’s road planning a success is purely a matter of opinion.

You were doing well until you started on about obese pedestrians and the need for even more money for cyclists.
While you may say my comment about Canberra’s road planning compared to other gridlocked cities being successful is just opinion, I am sure if you ran a poll there would be overwhelming agreement that our roads handle traffic well.

reddy84 12:23 pm 02 May 16

Acton said :

“……..people who would prefer not to own cars, but have an occasional need for them………”
I thought Uber had solved that problem. There have always been taxis as well.
BTW, I haven’t heard any “get rich quick” stories about those Uber besotted operators that were featured in the media a few months ago.

Uber and taxis are designed purely for point to point travel. Share cars are designed for those who require a flexible itinerary, each have their market.

There is not point in arguing against this service, we are shifting ever more to a share economy and that is the future.

On your comment on Canberra being planned for cars, you will find that every city that was planned during the 50s and 60s was designed for cars and you will find they all successfully cater to them. What sets Canberra apart is that our roads are designed for higher volumes and higher speeds than what is currently needed. That is due to an overly risk adverse government who cater for those idiotic minorities who want to travel at 70 or 80 in a 50km zone. Living in Belconnen area, I am flabbergasted at the width of our road reserves, you can fit 4 lanes where there are 2 in some places. This is to the detriment of the pedestrian experience and is a reason we have an increasing obesity issue. We should be reducing road widths, widening pedestrian footpaths and slowing down traffic to improve pedestrian and cycle access in our suburbs. To call Canberra’s road planning a success is purely a matter of opinion.

HenryBG 11:23 am 02 May 16

Peter Smith said :

These car sharing services are targeted at people who have good access to public transport already, hence the City locations of their hire vehicles. That means the 20 cars these people own are parked in private underground car parks and the owners already use public transport. They aren’t involved in the traffic congestion because they aren’t traveling into the city every morning or out every afternoon.

Uh-huh – so the pop-car market consists exclusively of people whose cars are parked in underground carparks, don’t drive their cars, and who use public transport and don’t use pop-cars, which themselves are exclusively parked above-ground.
That’s some clever analysis…

Peter Smith said :

Those 20 car spaces are in underground car parks, so it isn’t freeing up any spaces for the rest of Canberra. It is a simple concept, why do you not get it?

I have no idea where you get your underground carparks maths assumption from.

I’ll just leave you with this simple concept image, Wildturkey:
http://tinyurl.com/jnospsa
Notice two important things about this picture:
1 – The picture shows a bunch of car-share vehicles from a company called “Go-Get”
2 – the Go-Get cars are parked in an underground carpark

The question is – do *you* get it?

Lol. And I mean that literally.

dungfungus 9:45 am 02 May 16

Peter Smith said :

rommeldog56 said :

Good grief, this is some seriously muddled thinking.

Model A: 20 people have cars.
– 20 car parks are used, wherever these cars are at any given time.
– road congestion is added to by 20 cars X their average time spent driving on the road.

These car sharing services are targeted at people who have good access to public transport already, hence the City locations of their hire vehicles. That means the 20 cars these people own are parked in private underground car parks and the owners already use public transport. They aren’t involved in the traffic congestion because they aren’t traveling into the city every morning or out every afternoon.

Those 20 car spaces are in underground car parks, so it isn’t freeing up any spaces for the rest of Canberra. It is a simple concept, why do you not get it?
Those 4 Pop-cars take up their allocated parking space even when the vehicles are being used elsewhere, so effectively the rest of Canberra is losing those 4 spaces permanently, plus the 4 spaces the cars take up in the destination. 4 plus 4 = 8. Basic maths!

People in other cities are fearful of this change for valid, logical reasons.See this article – http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/car-share-schemes-booming-but-ruffle-a-few-feathers-20141127-11vgtt.html Those car sharing services have taken up 600 parking spaces in the Sydney region, to the dismay of residents who have lost their on-street parking spaces. It isn’t all good news, even the reviews from customers aren’t exactly glowing. Issues such as having a credit card hold of $500 placed for two weeks after the rental, having no vehicle available when needed and poor customer service has left many to go back to owning their own vehicle.

Yes, this proves it is perfect for Canberra. It’s another A Better Place moment.
Strange how Fairfax Media didn’t publish this story in the Canberra Times.
Perhaps Charlotte Harper could investigate that.

dungfungus 9:41 am 02 May 16

Lurker2913 said :

I can’t believe what I’m reading in this thread!

Car share is one of the 21st century’s greatest innovations – and it is PERFECT in a city like Canberra.

GoGet is for people who would prefer not to own cars, but have an occassional need for them. For example there are 1000s living in the inner-north, city and the ANU campus, who walk to work /uni but:
-Want to do a big shopping trip at Ikea/DFO on the weekend
-Go on a late night maccas/Kmart run
-Need to take kids to sport at far flung suburban fields
-Want to go down to Namadgi, Tidbinbilla or even Kambah pools for a few hours

Currently, many of these people do own cars – and only drive them 1-3 times/week. Or, they feel like they ‘have’ to use their car to make it worthwhile, so unecessarily drive to work/uni when they live so close anyway.

Personally I sold my car when I moved next to a GoGet pod, and now no longer take up a spot on my street.

And to those who say you can “just hire a car” – the traditional process for hiring a car is 20 minutes (I can be in a GoGet in 20 seconds), you have to return it with a full tank, the insurance is extortionate and there’s generally a 1 day minimum (GoGet is 30mins). And the major car rental places aren’t even open after 12pm Saturday/any time Sunday – let alone at 3am when I want a car to drive my mates home.

“……..people who would prefer not to own cars, but have an occasional need for them………”
I thought Uber had solved that problem. There have always been taxis as well.
BTW, I haven’t heard any “get rich quick” stories about those Uber besotted operators that were featured in the media a few months ago.

wildturkeycanoe 8:01 am 02 May 16

rommeldog56 said :

Good grief, this is some seriously muddled thinking.

Model A: 20 people have cars.
– 20 car parks are used, wherever these cars are at any given time.
– road congestion is added to by 20 cars X their average time spent driving on the road.

These car sharing services are targeted at people who have good access to public transport already, hence the City locations of their hire vehicles. That means the 20 cars these people own are parked in private underground car parks and the owners already use public transport. They aren’t involved in the traffic congestion because they aren’t traveling into the city every morning or out every afternoon.

Those 20 car spaces are in underground car parks, so it isn’t freeing up any spaces for the rest of Canberra. It is a simple concept, why do you not get it?
Those 4 Pop-cars take up their allocated parking space even when the vehicles are being used elsewhere, so effectively the rest of Canberra is losing those 4 spaces permanently, plus the 4 spaces the cars take up in the destination. 4 plus 4 = 8. Basic maths!

People in other cities are fearful of this change for valid, logical reasons.See this article – http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/car-share-schemes-booming-but-ruffle-a-few-feathers-20141127-11vgtt.html Those car sharing services have taken up 600 parking spaces in the Sydney region, to the dismay of residents who have lost their on-street parking spaces. It isn’t all good news, even the reviews from customers aren’t exactly glowing. Issues such as having a credit card hold of $500 placed for two weeks after the rental, having no vehicle available when needed and poor customer service has left many to go back to owning their own vehicle.

braddonmonsta 8:33 am 01 May 16

I can’t believe what I’m reading in this thread!

Car share is one of the 21st century’s greatest innovations – and it is PERFECT in a city like Canberra.

GoGet is for people who would prefer not to own cars, but have an occassional need for them. For example there are 1000s living in the inner-north, city and the ANU campus, who walk to work /uni but:
-Want to do a big shopping trip at Ikea/DFO on the weekend
-Go on a late night maccas/Kmart run
-Need to take kids to sport at far flung suburban fields
-Want to go down to Namadgi, Tidbinbilla or even Kambah pools for a few hours

Currently, many of these people do own cars – and only drive them 1-3 times/week. Or, they feel like they ‘have’ to use their car to make it worthwhile, so unecessarily drive to work/uni when they live so close anyway.

Personally I sold my car when I moved next to a GoGet pod, and now no longer take up a spot on my street.

And to those who say you can “just hire a car” – the traditional process for hiring a car is 20 minutes (I can be in a GoGet in 20 seconds), you have to return it with a full tank, the insurance is extortionate and there’s generally a 1 day minimum (GoGet is 30mins). And the major car rental places aren’t even open after 12pm Saturday/any time Sunday – let alone at 3am when I want a car to drive my mates home.

dungfungus 7:52 am 01 May 16

madelini said :

dungfungus said :

dungfungus said :

Please, experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking problems than Canberra has already shown that these systems work and reduce car ownership to boot. They wouldn’t be opening up here if they hadn’t already proved this works in MANY other places around the world first. It’s not like this is a brand new startup that only exists in Canberra.

Yes, because it works elsewhere it’ll work in Canberra? So why don’t we have heavy rail or a subway network, a ferry service, an international airport accessing the world, tollways, 100 storey buildings, maybe some manufacturing or mining industries, a huge stadium capable of seating fifty thousand spectators, a permanent amusement park like perhaps a Wet’n’Wild or Movieworld?
I just do not get why we have to have things in Canberra simply because they “work” in other places. We are not like any other major city in Australia, for one because there is no ocean, two we have no real industrial sector or natural resource in the state to keep the economy and government coffers prosperous and three, our population is tiny in comparison.
Like you said “experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking”. The same won’t necessarily work in this little town.

Yeah, why do we have freeways “in this little town”? It’s not like we are L.A. or Sydney or Melbourne.

…and not like freeways ever work anywhere else.

Was just watching the commercial news last night and the the big topic was massive congestion and accidents in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne.

But not in Canberra where planning for the private motor vehicle as the primary form of transport has been a resounding success which you choose to deny.

dungfungus 4:43 pm 30 Apr 16

dungfungus said :

dungfungus said :

Please, experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking problems than Canberra has already shown that these systems work and reduce car ownership to boot. They wouldn’t be opening up here if they hadn’t already proved this works in MANY other places around the world first. It’s not like this is a brand new startup that only exists in Canberra.

Yes, because it works elsewhere it’ll work in Canberra? So why don’t we have heavy rail or a subway network, a ferry service, an international airport accessing the world, tollways, 100 storey buildings, maybe some manufacturing or mining industries, a huge stadium capable of seating fifty thousand spectators, a permanent amusement park like perhaps a Wet’n’Wild or Movieworld?
I just do not get why we have to have things in Canberra simply because they “work” in other places. We are not like any other major city in Australia, for one because there is no ocean, two we have no real industrial sector or natural resource in the state to keep the economy and government coffers prosperous and three, our population is tiny in comparison.
Like you said “experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking”. The same won’t necessarily work in this little town.

You forgot to nominate the Eiffel Tower.

rubaiyat 1:59 pm 30 Apr 16

dungfungus said :

dungfungus said :

Please, experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking problems than Canberra has already shown that these systems work and reduce car ownership to boot. They wouldn’t be opening up here if they hadn’t already proved this works in MANY other places around the world first. It’s not like this is a brand new startup that only exists in Canberra.

Yes, because it works elsewhere it’ll work in Canberra? So why don’t we have heavy rail or a subway network, a ferry service, an international airport accessing the world, tollways, 100 storey buildings, maybe some manufacturing or mining industries, a huge stadium capable of seating fifty thousand spectators, a permanent amusement park like perhaps a Wet’n’Wild or Movieworld?
I just do not get why we have to have things in Canberra simply because they “work” in other places. We are not like any other major city in Australia, for one because there is no ocean, two we have no real industrial sector or natural resource in the state to keep the economy and government coffers prosperous and three, our population is tiny in comparison.
Like you said “experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking”. The same won’t necessarily work in this little town.

Yeah, why do we have freeways “in this little town”? It’s not like we are L.A. or Sydney or Melbourne.

…and not like freeways ever work anywhere else.

Was just watching the commercial news last night and the the big topic was massive congestion and accidents in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne.

HenryBG 1:44 pm 30 Apr 16

Shart said :

As I just explained, one Pop-car takes up it’s designated space in public parking whether it is there or not, plus occupies the space where it is taken to. A private car space remains unavailable at the owner’s premises whether they have a car or not. This is why these Go-get services will inevitably take up more public parking spaces whilst the number of private car parks remains the same. As demand increases, more public parking is going to be surrendered to the new hire car companies. It helps the people in Civic, but makes things worse for those coming from the suburbs.
You not deciding to buy a car means you probably have easy access to public transport. That also means you probably don’t drive to work already, so the choice to not own a car does nothing for public parking, nor does it free up a spot for anybody else. The Go-get car you will choose to use occasionally will occupy a spot where there used to be visitor parking. It doesn’t free up anything but actually uses more of the presently available parking spots.
If you don’t believe me, look at the map available on Go-get’s website and see where their cars are parked. They are in public car parks, taking up space that you or I could be using for our trip into Canberra’s central district.

Good grief, this is some seriously muddled thinking.

Model A: 20 people have cars.
– 20 car parks are used, wherever these cars are at any given time.
– road congestion is added to by 20 cars X their average time spent driving on the road.

Model B: 20 people give up cars
– 20 car parks are now free, all the time, that were otherwise used
– 4 pop-cars are provided, using up 4 car-parks, wherever these cars are at any give time
– people are less likely to make car trips, and more likely to share or pool on the trips they make, so road congestion is greatly reduced.

It’s not exactly rocket science, but I think I understand why some people are particularly fearful of change or new things, having seen your convoluted and unsuccessful attempt to understand how this new thing will work.

wildturkeycanoe 6:51 pm 29 Apr 16

dungfungus said :

Please, experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking problems than Canberra has already shown that these systems work and reduce car ownership to boot. They wouldn’t be opening up here if they hadn’t already proved this works in MANY other places around the world first. It’s not like this is a brand new startup that only exists in Canberra.

Yes, because it works elsewhere it’ll work in Canberra? So why don’t we have heavy rail or a subway network, a ferry service, an international airport accessing the world, tollways, 100 storey buildings, maybe some manufacturing or mining industries, a huge stadium capable of seating fifty thousand spectators, a permanent amusement park like perhaps a Wet’n’Wild or Movieworld?
I just do not get why we have to have things in Canberra simply because they “work” in other places. We are not like any other major city in Australia, for one because there is no ocean, two we have no real industrial sector or natural resource in the state to keep the economy and government coffers prosperous and three, our population is tiny in comparison.
Like you said “experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking”. The same won’t necessarily work in this little town.

dungfungus 8:07 am 29 Apr 16

dungfungus said :

gooterz said :

Shart said :

Let’s say for a minute that this thing takes off and Civic dwellers adopt the new way of travel. Go-get finds its cars are constantly on the streets and they need more to satisfy demand. They buy more cars for the fleet and park them where? On the kerb or in street parking? In the underground private parking spaces of apartments? If the former, parking spots are taken away from anybody wanting to visit their mates in Tramville and soon there are even less parking spaces left for anybody wanting to drive to the city for shopping or business. If the latter, those cars are only accessible to tenants of the building, which wouldn’t suit the purpose of the business venture. As the fleet gets larger, they will inevitably take up parking spaces, either in the public car parks or the on street parking zones adjacent residential areas. You couldn’t say that a handful of these cars is going to be a great business plan, they have to be looking at up-scaling to make it more profitable. Always, these cars are going to be located nearest to high density housing and community centers, never in the middle of a suburban fringe-dwelling habitat.

Mordd said :

It’s true that the service only really works if you live in the city near a pod. If you live out in the suburbs it’s not really practical. But so what? A service doesn’t have to please everyone to be useful and viable.

So if it helps the city dwellers it’s a great idea, screw the rest of Canberra! Just like the tram…

dungfungus said :

If several people avail themselves of the car a day, that is several cars not on the road or not occupying parking spaces.

It would make little difference if thousands of people sold their cars tomorrow, because the ones who use this new service would be the ones who already use public transport to get to work and back. The parking spaces freed up would be their own spot in the basement of a building, not the one in London Circuit, because they can get there by bus already. The ones who fill up the car parks, the ones who cause the congestion, are not the city dwellers but the people from Woden, Belconnen Gungahlin and Tuggeranong. Go-get will not change these people’s travel habits, but will take up more parking in their destination. The more Go-get and Pop-cars in Civic, sitting idle whilst they wait for an occasional user to walk by, the more parking spaces taken up. Then when they are hired, the space remains vacant but not available to anybody else except the renter of the vehicle. At least when a suburbanite goes home, the parking space can be used by anybody else.

rubaiyat said :

I don’t know whether to call this a big fat maths fail or something else.
If I decide to not buy a car, that frees up a parking space.
One Popcar serves the needs of multiple people who have done away with a car of their own.
For every 1 extra Popcar you see, that is 1xX extra parking spaces that have been freed up, where X represents the number of cars that are given up per Popcar that is in circulation.

As I just explained, one Pop-car takes up it’s designated space in public parking whether it is there or not, plus occupies the space where it is taken to. A private car space remains unavailable at the owner’s premises whether they have a car or not. This is why these Go-get services will inevitably take up more public parking spaces whilst the number of private car parks remains the same. As demand increases, more public parking is going to be surrendered to the new hire car companies. It helps the people in Civic, but makes things worse for those coming from the suburbs.
You not deciding to buy a car means you probably have easy access to public transport. That also means you probably don’t drive to work already, so the choice to not own a car does nothing for public parking, nor does it free up a spot for anybody else. The Go-get car you will choose to use occasionally will occupy a spot where there used to be visitor parking. It doesn’t free up anything but actually uses more of the presently available parking spots.
If you don’t believe me, look at the map available on Go-get’s website and see where their cars are parked. They are in public car parks, taking up space that you or I could be using for our trip into Canberra’s central district.

But they are the edgy thing that fits with the image of the coolest little capital in the world; like the Westside Containers Terminal (or should that read the Terminal Westside Containers).

Please, experience in other much bigger cities with far worse parking problems than Canberra has already shown that these systems work and reduce car ownership to boot. They wouldn’t be opening up here if they hadn’t already proved this works in MANY other places around the world first. It’s not like this is a brand new startup that only exists in Canberra. But don’t let the facts get in the way or your elegant argument by any means.

The “facts” are the missing details because there must be substantial concessions being given by our government to make it profitable for the operators.
It’s the same as this farce about 100% renewable electricity by 2020. There is a significant surcharge for us all to pay for a few to feel good and we have no choice to “opt out”.
Most Canberrans have to have a car (and there is nothing wrong with that as Canberra was designed for cars) will pay the cost of these follies for the benefit of a few.
Perhaps you could enlighten us as to why this “brand new start-up” is good for us.

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