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Halloween? WTF?

By Leinna - 1 November 2010 144

I’m sitting at home studying when I get a knock at the door.

Creepy kids in costume, aged about 6 or 7.  “Trick or Treat?”

I reply:  “Sorry kids, I don’t do that.”

They sigh, groan and mutter and head off.

I feel like telling them “Maybe you should try the United States.”

Is this getting more common nowadays?  Is it bad form not having anything?

Halloween

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144 Responses to
Halloween? WTF?
chewy14 9:52 am 01 Nov 10

colourful sydney racing identity said :

I really liked having my windscreen covered in flour because I had the audacity to politely inform unknown children that I would not be giving them lollies.

The best is when they egg the windscreen after flour bombing it. Creates a lovely windscreen batter.

Holden Caulfield 9:50 am 01 Nov 10

Thumper said :

Kids dressing up and having a good time.

I can’t see a problem here.

Agreed. All pretty harmless really.

ConanOfCooma 9:45 am 01 Nov 10

Halloween “…has roots in the Celtic festival of Samhain and the Christian holiday All Saints’ Day…”.

It is not an American holiday, I am sick of people perpetuating total crap that “someone” told them.

Considering the Eurpoean ties that we are happy to uphold with “Australian” traditions, I don’t understand why you all can’t be more forgiving.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

Thumper 9:36 am 01 Nov 10

Kids dressing up and having a good time.

I can’t see a problem here.

colourful sydney rac 9:30 am 01 Nov 10

I really liked having my windscreen covered in flour because I had the audacity to politely inform unknown children that I would not be giving them lollies.

georgesgenitals 9:30 am 01 Nov 10

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

Australian culture

Is that where you selectively copy everything good to ever come out of the US, the UK or New Zealand and claim it’s yours?

Don’t forget Beer And Meat On A Stick Day.

Lazy I 9:27 am 01 Nov 10

How terrible.. kids having a good time dressing up!

I hope you told them off so you could get back to surfing the net! (another horrible cultural adoption from the US!).

Alternatively, you could just buy the $5.00 worth of lollies to hand out and cheer up.

rottweiler 9:25 am 01 Nov 10

Last week we opened the letter box to find a flier from one of the neighbours inviting us to a trick or treat walk around the block, They asked for us to meet at local park at 5pm all kids must have parent with them and if we didn’t have kids but want to hand out some lollies etc to put a balloon or something on the letter box to let the kiddies know who’s door to knock on. We thought it was a great idea to give notice and have the chance to join in, unfortunately we didn’t do it as it was raining and we headed off to our halloween party.

Woody Mann-Caruso 9:24 am 01 Nov 10

Australian culture

Is that where you selectively copy everything good to ever come out of the US, the UK or New Zealand and claim it’s yours?

Snarky 9:20 am 01 Nov 10

Where we lived in the UK, whether or not you were willing to play along with trick or treating on Halloween was communicated by the presence or absence of a carved pumpkin, scary poster or similar near the front door on the night. Pumpkin showing = sweeties, no pumpkin = save your breath and move on. Worked pretty well.

georgesgenitals 9:18 am 01 Nov 10

We saw several lots of kids dressed up in the neighbourhood last night, but the only group that actually knocked on our door were three very scantily clad teenage girls, apparent dressed as ‘nerds’. The missus gave them each a fun sized chocolate bar, which I thought was funny, since teenage girls don’t eat anything anyway.

I think it’s fine if a few groups of little kids dressed up wander around while it’s still daylight. It’s not something I think we should adopt on a larger scale, though.

Hells_Bells74 9:17 am 01 Nov 10

My son with help of his big sister and later with his mate’s big sisters bagged loads of goodies.

My kids have always wanted to do it, my eldest daughter was a huge fan and always did it with other kids from the street and the others sometimes followed suit. They get cash ($5-$10) everytime too. My eldest reaching a new stage in her life didn’t dress up or ask for any treats herself this year. Just made sure to take her little bro out.

So I’m glad the generous folks around these parts helped in making some kids very happy. Perhaps if it offends you could put a sign up in similiar fashion to a no junk mail, except saying – No Trick or Treater’s. If my kids still knocked, you could knock ’em on the head 😉

clp 9:14 am 01 Nov 10

I thought it was a nice way for us to get to know our neighbours as we have newly moved – send the kids out asking for lollies. Heck they love dressing up and we’re very excited about it – yes you can be all curmugeonly and claims its all americanisation or you could recognise it as a community activity which kids enjoy.

neanderthalsis 9:08 am 01 Nov 10

After a great many years of muttering about seppo traditions entrenching themselves in Australian culture and telling creepy kiddies to bugger off on holloween, I decided this year to be prepared and purchased a stock of sweeties. This year, however, not one knock on the door. Looks like I’ll have to eat the freddo frogs and redskins myself.

Woody Mann-Caruso 9:08 am 01 Nov 10

They’re allowed to ask, you’re allowed to say no.

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