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Jeremy Hanson’s response to “small problem” over blood borne diseases

By johnboy 12 January 2011 24

letter to the editor

Following on from the Chiefly castigation of Jeremy Hanson the Liberals have emailed through a scan of a letter to the editor they’ve had published on this issue.

To date, just one case of transmission has occurred in 18 months. Given that several hundred prisoners have moved through the jail since it opened, this equates to a transfer rate of about a quarter to a half of 1 per cent.

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Jeremy Hanson’s response to “small problem” over blood borne diseases
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p1 1:04 pm 14 Jun 11

Since this thread has been resurrected…

Peep said :

Which brings me to my new point – Crims shouldn’t be allowed anything in prisons that we’re not allowed on planes.

So no glasses, aerosol cans or nail clippers.

Well that solved the question of weather they should be allowed to smoke.

Jim Jones 12:27 pm 14 Jun 11

Pippy said :

fgzk said :

In 2008 Prison Based Syringe Exchange (PSE) operated in 60 prisons in at least 9 countries including Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Belarus, America, Iran, Kyrgystan, Moldova and Luxembourg (AVIL 2008)

.

anyone know how many of these are still in operation?

All of them.

Needle exchange programs generally don’t get shut down because they’re been proven to be a highly effective means of harm minimisation.

Pippy 12:04 pm 14 Jun 11

fgzk said :

In 2008 Prison Based Syringe Exchange (PSE) operated in 60 prisons in at least 9 countries including Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Belarus, America, Iran, Kyrgystan, Moldova and Luxembourg (AVIL 2008)

.

anyone know how many of these are still in operation?

fgzk 2:28 pm 14 Jan 11

Pippy “your whole attitude to this issue is contradictory, in any suggestion that there is such a thing as “healthy use of drugs” . ok – so what do you suggest they inject with these provided needles?”

Way to go with the miss quoting. But now that you mentioned it, yes I would support the “healthy use of drugs.”

If you want to read the information available then you might like to contact AVIL or visit their web site. avil.org.au I found a paper ” Legislative and policy barriers to needle and syringe programs and injecting equipment access for people who inject drugs(2010)” that directly discusses the AMC NSP program.
In 2008 Prison Based Syringe Exchange (PSE) operated in 60 prisons in at least 9 countries including Switzerland, Spain, Germany, Belarus, America, Iran, Kyrgystan, Moldova and Luxembourg (AVIL 2008)

I believe what is being discussed is a trail program. We have a new jail and an opportunity to explore what can be done. We should at least take the opportunity to test the evidence gained from overseas. If the guards don’t think it will work then I’m sure they will have every opportunity to contribute to its failure.

Needle exchange programs have proved time and again to be the most cost effective way of dealing with a groups of issues that effect a small part of the community. It has reduced the transmition of BBV’s. That should be enough to support it.

Risky behaviour is part of life. I doubt needles are responsible. My guess would be its more of a people thing.

IndigoBlue A second hand story from a poverty stricken African state where one user injects the drugs and then shares his blood via a transfusion with three other people. Sick junkies have just got to get it in. Odd, isn’t it.

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