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Joint Strike Fighter Seminar & Networking Function – Monday 2 December

By MWest - 21 November 2013 4

To celebrate the end of 2013, the American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics (AIAA) proudly presents

WORKING AT THE LEADING EDGE OF AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY

by Air Vice-Marshal Kym Osley, AM, CSC – Program Manager, RAAF’s New Air Combat Capability

Date: Monday 2 December 2013
Time: 6:30pm till 8:30pm
Location: The Deck & Nottingham Room, Forrest Hotel & Apartments, 30 National Circuit, Forrest, Canberra

Tickets on sale via http://jsfseminarcanberra.eventbrite.com.au. Ticket sales close at 5:00pm on Monday 25 November.

Cost: $15 for AIAA student members, $25 for AIAA professional members and $38 for the general public. The ticket price includes canapes, beverages and entry to AVM’s Osley’s presentation.

Join us as Air Vice-Marshal Kym Osley discusses his time serving in the Middle East and the other key positions that lead him to the become the Program Manager for the RAAF’s New Air Combat Capability (NACC). AVM Osley will then discuss the NACC program, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, it’s introduction to RAAF service and Australian industry’s involvement in the JSF program. Canapés and alcoholic beverages will be served prior to the presentation and will provide an opportunity to network with other aerospace professionals.

Joint Strike Fighter

A map showing the location of the Forrest Hotel & Apartments can be found online here. Parking is available at the hotel or on National Circuit (free after 6:00pm).

A brief biography of the speaker is below. Have you considered attending this event as part of your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) activities? Attendance at AIAA lectures and seminars can help you accrue CPD hours. You can find out more about AIAA membership and join today here.

This event is also supported by the Centenary of Canberra Celebrations.

———————
About AVM Kym Osley:

Air Vice-Marshal (AVM) Osley joined the Royal Australian Air Force in January 1977. He has flown as an Air Combat Officer in F-111 strike aircraft with No 1 Squadron before being posted on exchange to fly in reconnaissance Phantoms with the USAF in Texas. On return to Australia in 1988, he flew reconnaissance RF-111C aircraft with No 6 Squadron.

In the period 1990-93, AVM Osley was responsible for major strike-reconnaissance projects within Capability Development (Air) Branch. Following staff training in 1994, he was the Air Force strategic planner for three years before taking command of No 1 Squadron (F-111).

On promotion to Group Captain in late 1999, AVM Osley was posted to the United Kingdom as the Air Force Adviser. In 2002 he undertook senior staff studies before being appointed Officer Commanding No 82 Wing. In August 2004 he was posted on promotion to Director General Capability and Plans, Canberra. In this position he assisted with planning the future force structure for the Australian Defence Force.

AVM Osley deployed as Director of the Combined Air Operations Centre in the Middle East in the period November 2006 to March 2007. In this position, he directed Coalition air operations over Iraq and Afghanistan. He took up the appointment of Commander Air Combat Group in July 2007. Following studies at Harvard Business School in early 2008, AVM Osley was promoted to his current rank and appointed as Head of Australian Defence Staff (Washington) in July 2008. In December 2010, AVM Osley returned to Australia to take up the position of Program Manager New Air Combat Capability (PM NACC).

AVM Osley is married to Debbie Osley, and they have three older sons. AVM Osley has a BSc (Physics), MA, MDef Stud, Grad Dip Mangt, Grad Dip Mil Av and is a graduate of the Harvard Business School (Advanced Management Program). He was awarded a Conspicuous Service Cross for Services to the Air Force in 1997 and is a Member of the Order of Australia (2008) for his contributions to Australia’s air combat capability.

For information about the AIAA Sydney Section visit http://www.aiaasydneysection.org

For information about Canberra’s Centenary Celebrations visit http://www.canberra100.com.au

What’s Your opinion?


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4 Responses to
Joint Strike Fighter Seminar & Networking Function – Monday 2 December
thebrownstreak69 11:00 am 22 Nov 13

Robertson said :

Let’s see – it only has one engine. It has stuff-all range. It’s slow. It can hardly carry anything. If you do load it up, it loses its stealth capability.

And cost-wise, compared with the far superior Russian offering? 3x the price of the Russian strike fighter our neighbours are starting to buy and which can run rings around the JSF on every single performance metric.

Let’s not buy too many of these things, eh?

If we bought one or two less than planned our budget problems would be completely solved.

johnboy 10:03 am 22 Nov 13

JSF is an electronic warfare platform.

Nothing it does well can be publicly announced.

As for the russian kit.

Terrible maintenance loads leading to bugger all availability. And the vital simulators just not on the same planet.

Robertson 9:53 am 22 Nov 13

Let’s see – it only has one engine. It has stuff-all range. It’s slow. It can hardly carry anything. If you do load it up, it loses its stealth capability.

And cost-wise, compared with the far superior Russian offering? 3x the price of the Russian strike fighter our neighbours are starting to buy and which can run rings around the JSF on every single performance metric.

Let’s not buy too many of these things, eh?

JonahBologna 9:10 am 22 Nov 13

I saw a great investigative documentary about this program(me) in flight the last time I flew internationally. This plane is more of a political and corporate necessity than a defense requirement.

http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2013/02/18/3690317.htm

“The question is how and why did Australia lock itself into a project that both experts and senior US politicians say is dangerously flawed? Four Corners asks three crucial questions. Why was the plane chosen without an open and competitive tender? Why did the then head of the RAAF give the plane and the project his stamp of approval when it was barely off the drawing board? And will the aircraft’s capabilities have to be downgraded before it gets into service?”

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