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Leave the baby magpies alone

By johnboy 29 October 2013 28

magpies

TAMS are asking you to let baby magpies be:

Echoing the recent plea from the RSPCA-ACT, Territory and Municipal Services rangers today urged the public not to mistakenly rescue baby magpies that may appear to be abandoned on the ground.

“Each year, many members of the public make the kind-hearted mistake of assuming a fledgling is injured or abandoned, and attempt to rescue the bird and take it to the RSPCA,” Kristy Gould, Parks and Conservation Ranger, said today.

“It’s not often the young birds are injured, rather, they are still mastering the essential skill of flying.

The parents of the fledgling are usually close by watching over the bird as it learns to take flight. This learning process can take a couple of days; however some fledglings may take longer than others.

“If people believe the fledgling is in harm’s way, for example if there is a dog or a cat nearby, place the bird back in the nest or leave them as high as possible near the nest.”

[Photo by Toby Hudson, Via Wikimedia]

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Leave the baby magpies alone
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Watson 10:39 am 30 Oct 13

JazzyJess said :

dph said :

I live across from a park.

5-10 yrs ago during Spring, you couldn’t walk through their without being swooped by a Magpie.

In the last couple of yrs, nothing. The Magpies continue to go about their business, even when you walk within feet of their presence. They’re not fazed at all.

I’m wondering whether they’ve simply become used to the environment, as the park gets a fair bit of foot traffic walking through on a daily basis or whether they’re nesting elsewhere?

Also, they will occasionally swoop on dogs that stray through the park. Never humans though.

I asked a vet about this (i.e. why do some magpies swoop and not others) and his take was that birds swoop if they’ve had negative experiences of humans in the past. Makes sense to me.

Which includes do-gooders trying to rescue their chicks. Another good reason to leave them alone.

JazzyJess 10:00 am 30 Oct 13

dph said :

I live across from a park.

5-10 yrs ago during Spring, you couldn’t walk through their without being swooped by a Magpie.

In the last couple of yrs, nothing. The Magpies continue to go about their business, even when you walk within feet of their presence. They’re not fazed at all.

I’m wondering whether they’ve simply become used to the environment, as the park gets a fair bit of foot traffic walking through on a daily basis or whether they’re nesting elsewhere?

Also, they will occasionally swoop on dogs that stray through the park. Never humans though.

I asked a vet about this (i.e. why do some magpies swoop and not others) and his take was that birds swoop if they’ve had negative experiences of humans in the past. Makes sense to me.

dph 10:56 pm 29 Oct 13

I live across from a park.

5-10 yrs ago during Spring, you couldn’t walk through their without being swooped by a Magpie.

In the last couple of yrs, nothing. The Magpies continue to go about their business, even when you walk within feet of their presence. They’re not fazed at all.

I’m wondering whether they’ve simply become used to the environment, as the park gets a fair bit of foot traffic walking through on a daily basis or whether they’re nesting elsewhere?

Also, they will occasionally swoop on dogs that stray through the park. Never humans though.

Thumper 9:16 pm 29 Oct 13

Woody Mann-Caruso said :

No, baby magpies on the ground are going to be irresistible.

Judging by the number of babies in our neighbourhood, the very large number of cats (six in our small cul-de-sac alone) seem to be resisting rather well. Our cat, for example, merely sulks while the baby magpies helps themselves to the cat food about six inches from his head. They even have conversations.

My cats are terrified of the little dive bombing kamikazes…..

Thumper 9:15 pm 29 Oct 13

Watson said :

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

Wild and unpredictable?

They’re magpies. Seriously, little tiny birds, not grizzly bears…

astrojax 4:30 pm 29 Oct 13

Watson said :

astrojax said :

Watson said :

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

you live in their wild.

And your point is?

I don’t shove my face into a wild animal’s face either. And I’m very happy to share but my house is not their wild, thankyouverymuch.

who are you addressing with ‘there needs to be a buffer zone’? who do you expect to erect this buffer? to what effect? perhaps more pertinently, to what environmental detriment? i only meant, as george w. bush inferred in his famous phrase – man and fish can co-exist – that like james dean said, why can’t we all just get along?

Robertson 3:57 pm 29 Oct 13

shauno said :

Plenty around here and Currawongs but notice how Magpies get pretty friendly and will basically walk up to you take food out your hand without much effort. But Currawongs are the opposite they seem way more wary then Magpies. Just something I was observing the other day while having a beer on my front porch!

And then there are the bower birds that instantly take flight if they even see you simply look at them. The wattle birds are a bit more sociable, but the magpies are definitely on our wavelength. I’ve long considered the idea that the aborigines may have had a special relationship with them, because they are so very sociable.

Robertson 3:54 pm 29 Oct 13

astrojax said :

Watson said :

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

you live in their wild.

Presumably they live in his suburb.

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