Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

Donating over $1.5 million to 350
local Community Groups each year

Leave the baby magpies alone

By johnboy - 29 October 2013 28

magpies

TAMS are asking you to let baby magpies be:

Echoing the recent plea from the RSPCA-ACT, Territory and Municipal Services rangers today urged the public not to mistakenly rescue baby magpies that may appear to be abandoned on the ground.

“Each year, many members of the public make the kind-hearted mistake of assuming a fledgling is injured or abandoned, and attempt to rescue the bird and take it to the RSPCA,” Kristy Gould, Parks and Conservation Ranger, said today.

“It’s not often the young birds are injured, rather, they are still mastering the essential skill of flying.

The parents of the fledgling are usually close by watching over the bird as it learns to take flight. This learning process can take a couple of days; however some fledglings may take longer than others.

“If people believe the fledgling is in harm’s way, for example if there is a dog or a cat nearby, place the bird back in the nest or leave them as high as possible near the nest.”

[Photo by Toby Hudson, Via Wikimedia]

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
28 Responses to
Leave the baby magpies alone
Holden Caulfield 2:15 pm 29 Oct 13

Tooks said :

…I wasn’t talking so much about people with bird phobias, but the ones who carry on like they’re getting attacked by giant vampire bats when they’re getting swooped…

You win my mid-90s walk down memory lane prize for the day!

DrKoresh 1:48 pm 29 Oct 13

Tooks said :

Fair points. I’m not afraid of snakes, but some spiders do bug me (terrible pun intended). I wasn’t talking so much about people with bird phobias, but the ones who carry on like they’re getting attacked by giant vampire bats when they’re getting swooped. Most magpies will just squawk and flap around near your head and very few will make contact. Not worth getting worked up about.

It’s insects for me, especially roaches/beetles. I don’t like spiders much either but they’re still nowhere near as repulsive to me as a cockroach, even though spiders have the potential to cause actual harm.

poetix 1:43 pm 29 Oct 13

Watson said :

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

Never have chips near seagulls! Lovely when you look at one on its own, but hideous in flocks. Mind you, I get the same feeling near food-courts.

Tooks 1:19 pm 29 Oct 13

zorro29 said :

Tooks said :

zorro29 said :

leave /them/ alone??? tell them to leave /us/ alone! the magpie swoopings (and constant anxiety during spring months) is definitely the one thing i don’t miss about canberra

I don’t understand why adults are afraid of birds. Bizarre.

i am more afraid of them now than i ever was as a kid….bird phobia is actually very common (one of the top phobias for adults). for me it’s the flapping wings…i have a fear of them flying at me (particularly near my face).

so penguins are all good with me 🙂

but i’m sure you’re afraid of stuff that other people find bizarre as well – like a lot of people are afraid of snakes, but i love them. phobias aren’t based on logic or rational thought.

i won’t ever be sold on magpies. while you can make friends with local ones, it doesn’t stop the random ones from attacking. can’t stand them…and canberra has /way/ too many of them (which probably explains their unusually aggressive behaviour)

Fair points. I’m not afraid of snakes, but some spiders do bug me (terrible pun intended). I wasn’t talking so much about people with bird phobias, but the ones who carry on like they’re getting attacked by giant vampire bats when they’re getting swooped. Most magpies will just squawk and flap around near your head and very few will make contact. Not worth getting worked up about.

astrojax 1:12 pm 29 Oct 13

zorro29 said :

Tooks said :

zorro29 said :

(which probably explains their unusually aggressive behaviour)

unusually? i remember being coralled on my school’s fenced double basketball/tennis courts, cowering by the brick wall in its middle as a couple of nesting magpies glowered at me. i was maybe eleven, and wasn’t brave enough to venture away until another couple of kids rode up on their bikes and i hightailed it home. this was sydney. i don’t think the nation’s capital has the maggie aggression to itself…

i am always nice to maggies now – always say hello. and i am entirely enamoured of their song; one of nature’s most beautiful things.

astrojax 1:05 pm 29 Oct 13

Watson said :

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

you live in their wild.

Woody Mann-Caruso 1:00 pm 29 Oct 13

No, baby magpies on the ground are going to be irresistible.

Judging by the number of babies in our neighbourhood, the very large number of cats (six in our small cul-de-sac alone) seem to be resisting rather well. Our cat, for example, merely sulks while the baby magpies helps themselves to the cat food about six inches from his head. They even have conversations.

zorro29 12:30 pm 29 Oct 13

Tooks said :

zorro29 said :

leave /them/ alone??? tell them to leave /us/ alone! the magpie swoopings (and constant anxiety during spring months) is definitely the one thing i don’t miss about canberra

I don’t understand why adults are afraid of birds. Bizarre.

i am more afraid of them now than i ever was as a kid….bird phobia is actually very common (one of the top phobias for adults). for me it’s the flapping wings…i have a fear of them flying at me (particularly near my face).

so penguins are all good with me 🙂

but i’m sure you’re afraid of stuff that other people find bizarre as well – like a lot of people are afraid of snakes, but i love them. phobias aren’t based on logic or rational thought.

i won’t ever be sold on magpies. while you can make friends with local ones, it doesn’t stop the random ones from attacking. can’t stand them…and canberra has /way/ too many of them (which probably explains their unusually aggressive behaviour)

shauno 12:06 pm 29 Oct 13

Plenty around here and Currawongs but notice how Magpies get pretty friendly and will basically walk up to you take food out your hand without much effort. But Currawongs are the opposite they seem way more wary then Magpies. Just something I was observing the other day while having a beer on my front porch!

Watson 12:01 pm 29 Oct 13

Robertson said :

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

I love magpies, but I can’t stand animals begging for food. And I don’t like any wildlife getting too close to me. They’re wild, they’re unpredictable, there needs to be a buffer zone.

Robertson 11:50 am 29 Oct 13

Feed them.
They are very sociable once they learn to trust you. When I water the garden, I have a couple of magpies that walk around alongside me, gargling at me. If I leave the kitchen door open, they come inside and scout around the kitchen floor for crumbs and scraps. Lovely birds, magpies.

Tooks 11:48 am 29 Oct 13

zorro29 said :

leave /them/ alone??? tell them to leave /us/ alone! the magpie swoopings (and constant anxiety during spring months) is definitely the one thing i don’t miss about canberra

I don’t understand why adults are afraid of birds. Bizarre.

Watson 10:27 am 29 Oct 13

I agree with the general sentiment but am confused. Do they want us to leave them alone or put them back in the nest? And have you seen how high most of those magpie nests are? You need a cherry picker to reach them…

I once put a cardboard box with a hole cut out over a magpie to protect him from dogs and cats. He didn’t particularly like it, but I thought it was worth a try.

I used to be one of those bleeding hearts wanting to rush every baby magpie on the ground to the rangers when I was a fresh migrant. Now I just leave them, even if I think there’s a chance they won’t survive. It’s up to nature. It’s not as if they’re endangered.

zorro29 9:48 am 29 Oct 13

leave /them/ alone??? tell them to leave /us/ alone! the magpie swoopings (and constant anxiety during spring months) is definitely the one thing i don’t miss about canberra

MsCheeky 9:43 am 29 Oct 13

Leave the baby magpies alone and keep your cat inside. That’s what the headline should read.

I know people argue that cats need to be kept in around sunset, night time and sunrise because that’s when they do their killing. No, baby magpies on the ground are going to be irresistible. Keep your cat inside.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site