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More speed cameras for the ACT – effective or waste of money?

By Evilomlap 31 August 2015 28

stock-car-traffic-speed-camera

The ACT Government has announced it will expand the territory’s speed camera network from today, with at least 30 new locations for mobile speed vans being trialled by the end of next month, and the vans on duty an extra 120 hours per week.

The more the merrier as far as I’m concerned. Anything that slows Canberra’s speeding drivers down for even a few minutes is a good thing.

What do you think? Effective deterrent or waste of taxpayers’ money?

What’s Your opinion?


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28 Responses to
More speed cameras for the ACT – effective or waste of money?
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Tooks 11:17 am 02 Sep 15

gooterz said :

How many patrol cars are getting replaced now

Speed (revenue) cameras do several things
– Cost money
– Take police off the road
– Target speeding and nothing else.

Speed cameras have nothing to do with police numbers. Zero, zilch, nada. Cameras aren’t replacing police.

My only issue with speed cameras is the placement. That p2p on Athllon Drive is ridiculous. You’d have to be trying to get a ticket to get pinged.

dungfungus 10:37 am 02 Sep 15

dungfungus said :

rubaiyat said :

Rollersk8r said :

gooterz said :

rigseismic67 said :

whats the problem? dont speed = dont pay

They’ll just lower the limits until they fill the revenue bucket. Year after year the bucket gets bigger.

No their logic is:

(a) More fines issued = behaviour not changing, more cameras needed.

(b) Less fines collected = behaviour adjustment working, more cameras needed.

Meanwhile, ACT road toll remains around 10 every year… I’d be willing to bet we have the highest number of speed cameras per capita – and also the lowest road death rate per capita.

We do have the lowest death rate but not the lowest severe road trauma rate.

Whilst deaths due to car accidents are on a long term decline, accidents and severe trauma are on a steady rise.

What this indicates is that better car safety standards and greater and more sophisticated medical intervention are keeping the victims of car crashes alive, but severely injured.

According to the Dept of Infrastructure & Regional Development statistics the cost of road crashes is now estimated at $27 billion a year.

Over 34,000 severely injured victims every year end up on the Australian hospital and social welfare budgets.

The ACT share of that is over $440 million per year.

Our high survival rate is probably due to lower speed limits and lack of rural driving, combined with the close proximity of health care. Country people are disproportionately represented in the road statistics both as fatalities and severe injuries. It is hard to get too far from help in the ACT.

Cars are a fact of life (and death).
What about the severe traumas resulting from bicycle accidents? You have conveniently left out any reference to them.

“Over 34,000 severely injured victims every year end up on the Australian hospital and social welfare budgets.”
My post was in relation to the cost to the community not to speed humps in Lycra running down pedestrians.

rubaiyat 10:22 am 02 Sep 15

dungfungus said :

rubaiyat said :

Rollersk8r said :

gooterz said :

rigseismic67 said :

whats the problem? dont speed = dont pay

They’ll just lower the limits until they fill the revenue bucket. Year after year the bucket gets bigger.

No their logic is:

(a) More fines issued = behaviour not changing, more cameras needed.

(b) Less fines collected = behaviour adjustment working, more cameras needed.

Meanwhile, ACT road toll remains around 10 every year… I’d be willing to bet we have the highest number of speed cameras per capita – and also the lowest road death rate per capita.

We do have the lowest death rate but not the lowest severe road trauma rate.

Whilst deaths due to car accidents are on a long term decline, accidents and severe trauma are on a steady rise.

What this indicates is that better car safety standards and greater and more sophisticated medical intervention are keeping the victims of car crashes alive, but severely injured.

According to the Dept of Infrastructure & Regional Development statistics the cost of road crashes is now estimated at $27 billion a year.

Over 34,000 severely injured victims every year end up on the Australian hospital and social welfare budgets.

The ACT share of that is over $440 million per year.

Our high survival rate is probably due to lower speed limits and lack of rural driving, combined with the close proximity of health care. Country people are disproportionately represented in the road statistics both as fatalities and severe injuries. It is hard to get too far from help in the ACT.

Cars are a fact of life (and death).
What about the severe traumas resulting from bicycle accidents? You have conveniently left out any reference to them.

Not “conveniently” at all. Perhaps you can tell us how many people bicycles run over and kill? Also the bike related crime?

Listening to you car deaths and trauma are just acts of God, drivers just happen to be around.

dungfungus 8:48 am 02 Sep 15

rubaiyat said :

Rollersk8r said :

gooterz said :

rigseismic67 said :

whats the problem? dont speed = dont pay

They’ll just lower the limits until they fill the revenue bucket. Year after year the bucket gets bigger.

No their logic is:

(a) More fines issued = behaviour not changing, more cameras needed.

(b) Less fines collected = behaviour adjustment working, more cameras needed.

Meanwhile, ACT road toll remains around 10 every year… I’d be willing to bet we have the highest number of speed cameras per capita – and also the lowest road death rate per capita.

We do have the lowest death rate but not the lowest severe road trauma rate.

Whilst deaths due to car accidents are on a long term decline, accidents and severe trauma are on a steady rise.

What this indicates is that better car safety standards and greater and more sophisticated medical intervention are keeping the victims of car crashes alive, but severely injured.

According to the Dept of Infrastructure & Regional Development statistics the cost of road crashes is now estimated at $27 billion a year.

Over 34,000 severely injured victims every year end up on the Australian hospital and social welfare budgets.

The ACT share of that is over $440 million per year.

Our high survival rate is probably due to lower speed limits and lack of rural driving, combined with the close proximity of health care. Country people are disproportionately represented in the road statistics both as fatalities and severe injuries. It is hard to get too far from help in the ACT.

Cars are a fact of life (and death).
What about the severe traumas resulting from bicycle accidents? You have conveniently left out any reference to them.

rubaiyat 4:10 am 02 Sep 15

This doesn’t become personal or a “real” issue of course until it happens to you.

Either you survive an accident caused by someone else and bear the consequences or you are the cause of the accident and have to carry the emotional scars as well:

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/acts-crash-course-in-road-trauma-20131207-2yy1u.html

There are people for whom repeat offending seems to come natural and we get to hear about them after a more egregious offence on the evening news.

Mostly it barely gets a mention, because it is just too common.

rubaiyat 9:19 pm 01 Sep 15

Rollersk8r said :

gooterz said :

rigseismic67 said :

whats the problem? dont speed = dont pay

They’ll just lower the limits until they fill the revenue bucket. Year after year the bucket gets bigger.

No their logic is:

(a) More fines issued = behaviour not changing, more cameras needed.

(b) Less fines collected = behaviour adjustment working, more cameras needed.

Meanwhile, ACT road toll remains around 10 every year… I’d be willing to bet we have the highest number of speed cameras per capita – and also the lowest road death rate per capita.

We do have the lowest death rate but not the lowest severe road trauma rate.

Whilst deaths due to car accidents are on a long term decline, accidents and severe trauma are on a steady rise.

What this indicates is that better car safety standards and greater and more sophisticated medical intervention are keeping the victims of car crashes alive, but severely injured.

According to the Dept of Infrastructure & Regional Development statistics the cost of road crashes is now estimated at $27 billion a year.

Over 34,000 severely injured victims every year end up on the Australian hospital and social welfare budgets.

The ACT share of that is over $440 million per year.

Our high survival rate is probably due to lower speed limits and lack of rural driving, combined with the close proximity of health care. Country people are disproportionately represented in the road statistics both as fatalities and severe injuries. It is hard to get too far from help in the ACT.

Nilrem 4:57 pm 01 Sep 15

How about putting one in the Bunda Street Shareway?

Rollersk8r 4:26 pm 01 Sep 15

gooterz said :

rigseismic67 said :

whats the problem? dont speed = dont pay

They’ll just lower the limits until they fill the revenue bucket. Year after year the bucket gets bigger.

No their logic is:

(a) More fines issued = behaviour not changing, more cameras needed.

(b) Less fines collected = behaviour adjustment working, more cameras needed.

Meanwhile, ACT road toll remains around 10 every year… I’d be willing to bet we have the highest number of speed cameras per capita – and also the lowest road death rate per capita.

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