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Shopping Trolley crackdown!

By johnboy - 18 December 2013 37

shopping trolleys

TAMS are once again wagging their bony fingers on the subject of shopping trolleys:

In the lead up to the busy Christmas period, 113 abandoned shopping trolleys have been collected in three separate blitzes in Tuggeranong, Gungahlin and Belconnen Michael Brice, Manager of Licensing and Compliance, City Services, said today.

The blitzes took place in Tuggeranong on Thursday 7 November, Gungahlin on Thursday 28 November and Belconnen on Monday 9 December with 11, 20 and 82 abandoned trolleys collected respectively. Another 10 trolleys were collected after removal notices were placed on abandoned trolleys.

“Prior to each collection day, retailers were given two days warning to advise them that trolleys located outside shopping precinct areas in parkland, open spaces, waterways or on playing fields will be impounded,” Mr Brice said.

“Leaving trolleys on the streets has a direct cost to retailers as there is a fee of $115.90 to retrieve a trolley that has been impounded.

“On top of regular collection days, TAMS also places shopping trolley removal notice stickers on abandoned trolleys that are reported by members of the public or identified during general patrols by city rangers.

Notice is given that Woden/Weston will get the trolley action on 19 December.

What’s Your opinion?


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37 Responses to
Shopping Trolley crackdown!
carnardly 3:38 pm 19 Dec 13

I’ve dobbed a few into trolley tracker but never been picked for the dobber in prize. that’s a shame because $1000 would be handy any time.

Deref 3:05 pm 19 Dec 13

maxblues said :

We have had two trolleys stolen from our stores in the last week. We have looked for them because we can’t afford to lose them at that rate. No doubt the gubbermint will find one and we will be fined rather than the bastards who stole them.

Are all your trolleys the kind with the $2 lock?

If not, why not?

maxblues 2:47 pm 19 Dec 13

We have had two trolleys stolen from our stores in the last week. We have looked for them because we can’t afford to lose them at that rate. No doubt the gubbermint will find one and we will be fined rather than the bastards who stole them.

zorro29 11:49 am 19 Dec 13

Good point #1

As was mentioned elsewhere, at our local in Sydney, they have that electronic wheel that stops you at certain points from taking the trolley any further. I haven’t tried it out but I know the wheel makes steering more annoying!

At any rate, whatever it takes to get people to stop using them as their personal transporting devices/removalists. Another example of the many getting punished because of the few.

magiccar9 11:38 am 19 Dec 13

How many trolleys weren’t collected? If it takes over 2 weeks and 2 reports to the ‘Fix My Street’ people to get a single trolley collected, I’d like to see the ones that are still in the targeted areas that were too much red tape to collect. It takes one Ranger to sticker the trolley and another to collect it 2 days later. What is the point of placing a sticker on the abandoned trolley anyway? It’s not like supermarket workers see one on their way to work and throw it in the back of their car.

Perhaps we could have a ban on trolleys in the ACT too? Surely they’re a large burden on the environment polluting our lakes, rivers, and grassy areas…

Innovation 11:34 am 19 Dec 13

JC said :

Innovation said :

I wonder how many trolleys are ones requiring a gold coin to use? If all supermarkets did this, most trolleys would make their way back to the bays and would be a nice little earner for kids to return any stragglers that are further away. It would also stop woollies customers putting their trolleys in ALDI bays making it harder to return ALDI trolleys!

Bulldust the trolleys that are an ‘issue’ are the ones that people decide are theirs to walk home with, then dump. These scumbags are not going to be too worried about walking back to get their $1 coin, if they were they would probably smash the mechanism anyway or find some other inventive way to get their money back.

How supermarkets are meant to even try and stop this is beyond me. Electronic wheel clamps maybe, but what M0les didn’t mention is in the UK, the big supermarkets/hypermarkets are normally in standalone centres with fences around them and gates for pedestrians, so quite easy to put in place mechanism to stop trolley theft when everyone going on foot needs to go out defined exits in the fence. Another method I’ve seen include putting down grate system, bit like what you see on travelators that grab the wheel, but again only works where people have no choice but to walk over it.

You don’t see these kind of mechanisms on the smaller supermarkets on the high street, which are more akin to what we have here (just normally smaller) in that they are basically open to the street. Very hard to stop someone stealing a trolley then.

OK so you’ve seen lots of errant ALDI trolleys have you? And I wasn’t suggesting that all offenders would bring the trolleys back. I was suggesting that someone seeing the trolley on their walk to the shops (eg, young kids) would bring the trolley along with them to make one or two bucks. Obviously it won’t fix the problem entirely and some mechanisms will get busted but the cost of repairing the mechanism surely would be less than the cost of collecting an impounded trolley.

ScienceRules 9:50 am 19 Dec 13

beedlebum said :

This guy in Hawaii had a more extreme ‘solution’ to the shopping trolley issue:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2510398/Hawaiian-politician-Tom-Brower-uses-SLEDGEHAMMER-smash-homeless-belongings.html

No, this guy in Hawaii used his privileged status as a lawmaker to deliberately destroy the meagre possessions of homeless people. In other words, he pretty much defines the term “douchebag”.

Thumper 8:52 am 19 Dec 13

Rogue shopping trolleys in enormous herds, thundering across the grassy plains.

Such a sight has not been seen around these parts since the great trolley cull of 1872….

JC 7:25 am 19 Dec 13

Innovation said :

I wonder how many trolleys are ones requiring a gold coin to use? If all supermarkets did this, most trolleys would make their way back to the bays and would be a nice little earner for kids to return any stragglers that are further away. It would also stop woollies customers putting their trolleys in ALDI bays making it harder to return ALDI trolleys!

Bulldust the trolleys that are an ‘issue’ are the ones that people decide are theirs to walk home with, then dump. These scumbags are not going to be too worried about walking back to get their $1 coin, if they were they would probably smash the mechanism anyway or find some other inventive way to get their money back.

How supermarkets are meant to even try and stop this is beyond me. Electronic wheel clamps maybe, but what M0les didn’t mention is in the UK, the big supermarkets/hypermarkets are normally in standalone centres with fences around them and gates for pedestrians, so quite easy to put in place mechanism to stop trolley theft when everyone going on foot needs to go out defined exits in the fence. Another method I’ve seen include putting down grate system, bit like what you see on travelators that grab the wheel, but again only works where people have no choice but to walk over it.

You don’t see these kind of mechanisms on the smaller supermarkets on the high street, which are more akin to what we have here (just normally smaller) in that they are basically open to the street. Very hard to stop someone stealing a trolley then.

beedlebum 6:48 am 19 Dec 13

This guy in Hawaii had a more extreme ‘solution’ to the shopping trolley issue:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2510398/Hawaiian-politician-Tom-Brower-uses-SLEDGEHAMMER-smash-homeless-belongings.html

M0les 12:40 am 19 Dec 13

Innovation said :

I wonder how many trolleys are ones requiring a gold coin to use? If all supermarkets did this, most trolleys would make their way back to the bays and would be a nice little earner for kids to return any stragglers that are further away. It would also stop woollies customers putting their trolleys in ALDI bays making it harder to return ALDI trolleys!

Aye!
When I lived in Cambridge a decade ago, the latest gigantic Tesco store had electronic wheel clamps on the trolleys that engaged when they ventured beyond the carpark. Just as well as this store was half a stone’s throw from the Cam. Seeing the staggeringly large pile of recovered bike and trolley carcass float-past the Pike and Eel on a barge, I can see why they’d go to those lengths.

Innovation 11:21 am 18 Dec 13

I wonder how many trolleys are ones requiring a gold coin to use? If all supermarkets did this, most trolleys would make their way back to the bays and would be a nice little earner for kids to return any stragglers that are further away. It would also stop woollies customers putting their trolleys in ALDI bays making it harder to return ALDI trolleys!

Erg0 11:06 am 18 Dec 13

You’re assuming that they’re trying to solve the problem. They might just be trying to give the supermarkets a financial incentive to do something about this themselves instead of relying on a publicly funded service to clean up after them.

NoniDoll 10:52 am 18 Dec 13

I can’t help reading this and imagining “shopping cart cowboys”, rounding up herds of trolleys with a crack of their whip.

I’m still trying to decide whether they’d be riding horses or… maybe bikes? Or those motorised scooters?

bd84 10:38 am 18 Dec 13

Another case of illogical thinking by the government..

The problem is the people dumping the trolleys no matter what the supermarkets do to try to prevent it, impounding the trolleys is not going to solve the problem. It’s like impounding the bus because a passenger got on without paying.

They apparently know all the common places where they are dumped, why are the rangers not setting up shop there and fining the lazy SOBs who dump them there. Might be because there are only about 2 rangers in the ACT.

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