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So many more of us, so many less fatalities

By johnboy - 2 January 2014 60

ACT Policing has recorded a single digit road toll of seven in 2013 making it the second lowest annual road toll since 1959.

Traffic Operations Officer in Charge, Station Sergeant Rod Anderson said achieving the second lowest road toll in over half a century was an indication of changing attitudes in Canberra drivers to road safety.

“Any fatality on our roads is one too many and as a community we should always aim to be fatality free,” Sergeant Anderson said.

“However, this is a noticeable improvement on the 12 deaths that occurred on our roads in 2012.”

“So many factors contributed to last year’s low road toll, including increased driver awareness, increased police patrols targeting traffic law enforcement, joint ACT Government and ACT Policing road safety campaigns and the outstanding work that our ambulance services do at the scene of road collisions.”

“There is no magic wand for preventing tragic deaths on our roads. At the end of the day it all comes down to driver attitudes behind the wheel.”

Sergeant Anderson said police would continue to be out in force during the holiday season detecting and removing drivers engaging in risky behaviour such as speeding, drink and drug driving, using mobile phones and not wearing seatbelts.

“Everyone has the right to travel on the roads safely, ACT Policing will continue its strong enforcement of our road laws, and will accept no excuses for any actions which jeopardise other people’s lives,” Sergeant Anderson said.

fatalities

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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60 Responses to
So many more of us, so many less fatalities
KB1971 11:07 am 03 Jan 14

johnboy said :

Look fatalities are a bloody stupid KPI at the best of times.

Accidents requiring hospitalisation would be much more interesting and useful, even then the nature of our mendacious public service is such that would be dangerous as someone trying to make their numbers look good for bonus time would start conniving to deny hospital care.

Management by KPI is always awful.

One would think after crappy application of a KPI murdered thousands of British Sailors at the Battle of Jutland and nearly lost the whole First World War in an afternoon we’d have learnt something (Battle Cruisers based away from proper firing ranges were judging crews entirely on rate of fire which lead to unsafe practices such as jamming open anti flash doors from turrets to magazines which in turn lead to widespread tragedy when the enemy started shooting back)

The thing with that is no one really records those statistics. The biggest problem is that injuries, permanent or otherwise accrued in road accidents are extremely broad and often difficult to attribute to an accident. A death is cut and dried to a certain extent with the exception being health reasons such as heart attacks ect.

The other thing, there is no national database for road accidents. To gather any statistical evidence from all the hospitals and enforcement agencies around the country would be an insurmountable job.

The Department of Infrastructure has some good information on accident statistics and road safety in motor vehicles:
http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/

HiddenDragon 11:00 am 03 Jan 14

This is relatively good news – but has there been a commensurate reduction in non-fatal accidents? and is there analysis which casts light on the accident reduction benefits (or not) of measures such as the point-to-point speed cameras?

switch 10:19 am 03 Jan 14

magiccar9 said :

“increased police patrols targeting traffic law enforcement…”

Cool, based on these comments I should expect to see more than 3 speed vans, 1 RBT station, and 2 patrol cars this year.

Just the same as the double demerit periods, they tout the increased presence on the roads, yet I fail to see a single marked (or even unmarked) car each time.

I certainly saw more cops to/from/in Sydney between Xmas and NYE than usual, last week.

magiccar9 9:59 am 03 Jan 14

“increased police patrols targeting traffic law enforcement…”

Cool, based on these comments I should expect to see more than 3 speed vans, 1 RBT station, and 2 patrol cars this year.

Just the same as the double demerit periods, they tout the increased presence on the roads, yet I fail to see a single marked (or even unmarked) car each time.

johnboy 9:38 am 03 Jan 14

Look fatalities are a bloody stupid KPI at the best of times.

Accidents requiring hospitalisation would be much more interesting and useful, even then the nature of our mendacious public service is such that would be dangerous as someone trying to make their numbers look good for bonus time would start conniving to deny hospital care.

Management by KPI is always awful.

One would think after crappy application of a KPI murdered thousands of British Sailors at the Battle of Jutland and nearly lost the whole First World War in an afternoon we’d have learnt something (Battle Cruisers based away from proper firing ranges were judging crews entirely on rate of fire which lead to unsafe practices such as jamming open anti flash doors from turrets to magazines which in turn lead to widespread tragedy when the enemy started shooting back)

KB1971 9:22 am 03 Jan 14

Seat belts have been the single biggest safety advance since 1959. There was a massive decrease in road deaths when they were introduced.

Everything else that has led us to the modern motor car has been incremental.

JC 9:19 am 03 Jan 14

I say it every year, but the one thing that people like the coppers and pollies seem to conveniently forget is the size of the ACT makes it very hard to read anything meaningful into year by year road stats. Statistically the sample is so small that we can see major variations for no reason what so ever, 2005 for example, or indeed 2011 and 2013.

For example lets say there was one more accident last year that killed all 5 occupants of the car, and the road toll equalled the year before, all from 1 single accident. Heaven help us if we ever had a Kempsy style bus accident where 35 were killed in one single accident.

For such a small sample size what is more important is the trend over a number of years. That trend based on the figures from 2000 provided above seems to be flat to trending slightly down though. Another 20 years of figures would help even more to draw any conclusions. They then of course should be compared to the national figures to see if they are following them or varying.

switch 9:13 am 03 Jan 14

WillowJim said :

“So many more of us, so fewer fatalities”

#pethate

“So many more of us, but fewer fatalities”

Tooks 9:10 am 03 Jan 14

I doubt driver behaviour has changed one iota since, say, 2005. Improved safety features and roads would be the main factors.

buzz819 9:10 am 03 Jan 14

IrishPete said :

Let’s see what he missed – improved safety standards in vehicles, speed limits (and average speeds through increased congestion) reducng gradually.

I doubt the reduction from 2012 to 2013 is statistically significant,or statistically robust, although the longer term trend possibly is so, especially when taken against rising population.

However, when there is inevitably an increase one year again, willl this policeman be around to say “yes, it’s partly the fault of the police, just like we took the partial credit when there was a decrease”? No, I didn’t think so. So excuse me for treating his statement with a big dose of salt.

And of course, the crap driving by ACT drivers on NSW roads must get an honourable mention. Learn what those orange lights on your car’s corners are for. Learn how to drive around proper roundabouts with proper rules (not the idiotic rules of many ACT ones). And learn that the king’s Highway is not your personal racetrack to your holiday house.

IP

Like all you comments I take it with a grain of salt.

There is one reason and one reason only the road toll is so low, there were not as many multiple fatality collisions.

Increased vehicle safety standards, what rubbish? They didn’t help last year and the roads haven’t changed enough to say that is what did it.

johnboy 9:08 am 03 Jan 14

Cars are much safer now, and ambulances can do more than scrape the meat off the road.

WillowJim 8:11 am 03 Jan 14

“So many more of us, so fewer fatalities”

#pethate

rosscoact 6:53 am 03 Jan 14

Yes, small sample size is a problem here, the difference is a couple of incidents which do or don’t happen.

However, isn’t the national total the lowest in 90 years?

gooterz 2:48 am 03 Jan 14

Fatalities are one thing what about the number of accidents? People left with permanent injury and worst of all number of times someone parked badly.

IrishPete 1:15 am 03 Jan 14

Let’s see what he missed – improved safety standards in vehicles, speed limits (and average speeds through increased congestion) reducng gradually.

I doubt the reduction from 2012 to 2013 is statistically significant,or statistically robust, although the longer term trend possibly is so, especially when taken against rising population.

However, when there is inevitably an increase one year again, willl this policeman be around to say “yes, it’s partly the fault of the police, just like we took the partial credit when there was a decrease”? No, I didn’t think so. So excuse me for treating his statement with a big dose of salt.

And of course, the crap driving by ACT drivers on NSW roads must get an honourable mention. Learn what those orange lights on your car’s corners are for. Learn how to drive around proper roundabouts with proper rules (not the idiotic rules of many ACT ones). And learn that the king’s Highway is not your personal racetrack to your holiday house.

IP

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