Skip to content Skip to main navigation

Community

The ANU College of Law
Australia’s National Law School

The “Mettle”, and why we are grasping it. Also, do we have too many schools?

By johnboy - 20 April 2006 14

The Canberra Times has a story in which Our Brave Leader tries to ready the community for a round of school closures.

I’m not sure if the Chief Minister, or the Canberra Times, is displaying their ignorance by announcing we need to “grasp the mettle” on this issue. Surely “The nettle” would be more usefully grasped?

In any event are community schools too expensive? Or are we not being given an adequate list of trade-offs? If the public were, for example, given a choice of an arboretum (human rights commissioner?), or a school within walking distance of their home, would they decide they’d like to afford community schools after all? How about corporate sponsorship in exchange for community schools? How about cutting the “multimedia skills” and “outdoor education” from the curriculum?

I’m not saying any of those trade-offs are either good, or the only ones available. I am saying that there appear to be options beyond the ones the government is presenting to us.

UPDATED: The ABC is reporting cautious support for closures from the Teacher’s Union while Jane Gorrie of the P&C remains unconvinced.

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
14 Responses to
The “Mettle”, and why we are grasping it. Also, do we have too many schools?
nyssa76 8:11 pm 22 Apr 06

Thumper, well he’s out of the country atm. That’s pretty much all I can say.

I hate that capitalism is more important than actually educating our young.

Then again, people will blame the teachers when schools close and children get lost a system that shouldn’t have been crippled.

The Comrade should forego his tax payer car etc as well as the other pollies. Then again, he should also not build the green house or light rail.

He must want people who have minimal job skills to work in them in the coming years.

Thumper 6:45 pm 22 Apr 06

Anyway, Saturday.

I need more beer. Cheers.

Thumper 6:38 pm 22 Apr 06

Nyss,

It’s all a cut costing measure. Everyone knows that but it’s a bit like the proverbial elephant in the room. It’s obvious but no-one wants to mention it.

Smaller schools, smaller classes is the undoubted way to go. Kids gets personal attention, they feel as if they are beingtaken seriously.

Large schools and we are just churning them out without knowing what level they have attained.

It’s false economy from a government who is looking for a quick fix to budget problems.

And in the end what do we get. Uneducated kids, kids with no idea about the basics of maths, english and the big bad ROTE.

Give me a kid who can speak, write, know basic maths over someone who can argue the merits of the UN anyday.

Frankly our education system is has gone to the dogs or if it hasn’t as yet, it is surely going that way.

Teach them the basics, give them the time of day, make them feel as if they are important. Don’t fob them off in a large system where they feel as if they are no-one and that no-one cares.

I despair for our kids these days. they don’t get the attention they need. Everyone of them has something to give but in the end it gets killed by the system which is all about churning them out.

Building self esteem and responsibility? It doesn’t exist anymore.

*sigh*

Hope your pusser hubby is ok. We lost a digger today in Iraq….

Thumper 6:38 pm 22 Apr 06

Nyss,

It’s all a cut costing measure. Everyone knows that but it’s a bit like the proverbial elephant in the room. It’s obvious but no-one wants to mention it.

Smaller schools, smaller classes is the undoubted way to go. Kids gets personal attention, they feel as if they are beingtaken seriously.

Large schools and we are just churning them out without knowing what level they have attained.

It’s false economy from a government who is looking for a quick fix to budget problems.

And in the end what do we get. Uneducated kids, kids with no idea about the basics of maths, english and the big bad ROTE.

Give me a kid who can speak, write, know basic maths over someone who can argue the merits of the UN anyday.

Frankly our education system is has gone to the dogs or if it hasn’t as yet, it is surely going that way.

Teach them the basics, give them the time of day, make them feel as if they are important. Don’t fob them off in a large system where they feel as if they are no-one and that no-one cares.

I despair for our kids these days. they don’t get the attention they need. Everyone of them has something to give but in the end it gets killed by the system which is all about churning them out.

Building self esteem and responsibility? It doesn’t exist anymore.

*sigh*

How you’re pusser hubby is ok. We lost a digger today in Iraq….

nyssa76 1:22 pm 22 Apr 06

South Canberra

78 – PS
124 – PS

Woden Valley

74 – PS
82 – PS

Weston Creek

71 – PS
88 – PS
119 – PS

Belconnen North

154 – PS
155 – PS
276 – HS
450 – C

Belconnen South

136 – PS

Tuggeranong North

131 – PS
142 – PS
149- PS
296 – HS
353 – HS

Gungahlin

156 – K-10 (new school)

Other ACT Areas

128 – PS
37 – PS
24 – PS

I deliberately picked PS with a student population of under 150 or slightly over (155), HS with a student population of under 350 or slightly higher (353) and a C population of 450 (the smallest C population in ACT).

These details are accessible to the public via the ACT Department of Education’s website.

Now that gives a clearer picture of schools who have small numbers – particularly PS.

nyssa76 1:11 pm 22 Apr 06

I’m going to look at the ACT Govt schools census data and see which schools are “under” enrolled.

I’ll post them here later.

nyssa76 1:10 pm 22 Apr 06

Another update is today’s CT: http://canberra.yourguide.com.au/detail.asp?class=news&subclass=local&story_id=475179&category=general%20news&m=4&y=2006

Andrew Barr reminds me of his former Federal counterpart….

Maelinar 8:21 am 21 Apr 06

Since they seem to eager to waste our tax dollar, why aren’t they considering light rail ?

At a government level I can already see the kickbacks rolling through:

1. We’ve got no money (overall) because the implementation of a light rail network is so expensive.
2. Keep voting for us because we are building stuff right across Canberra, and we don’t want to change the government half way through the project.

That’s not even mentioning all of their mates getting phat lucrative light-rail related contracts to do fuck all as well.

From Jon’s perspective though, why pay for something that the Feds and private enterprise seem to be doing pretty ok at anyway ?

Never mind that half the country can’t read or write anyway, Just remember it’s the children of tomorrow that will be in charge of interpreting the medication list in your old peoples home.

Wild times ahead.

tallian 6:17 pm 20 Apr 06

We’ve squibbed the decisions on schools for 15 years. There’s been too many for ages. Now the comrades have stuffed the budget, they’re desperate for action and it will be rushed through instead of being done sensibly over the last 10 years or so.

However, my bet would be the noise over closures will be too much and comrades will back off.

Les Whinin 4:23 pm 20 Apr 06

To add to the list of education bungles in the ACT: Charnwood High closes in 1995, all students sent to Ginninderra High. ~10 years later Ginn. High is set to close in favour of a “super-dooper-McMega-school-warehouse” … for what students exactly?

Perhaps with all this disposable income Canberran’s are supposed to have (being the pompous public servant fat-cats that we _all_ are), we can all afford a private school education for our children and thus do not need more than a handful of public schools?

nyssa76 2:53 pm 20 Apr 06

Oops. Should read Hackett, Watson and Downer PS. Watson High was separate.

nyssa76 2:52 pm 20 Apr 06

He just wants to save some money. However, opening a large greenhouse – who wants it anyway, is obviously top priority.

According to the ACT Govt, ACT schooling is the best in Australia. Yes it will still be the best but have the smallest allocation of schools.

Smaller schools suit some children.

When looking at the impact on closing schools, you only have to look at what happened when Hackett Primary, Downer Primary and Watson High (yes for those more “new” to Canberra they did exist once) closed within 2-3 yrs of one another.

You now have Majura (amalgamation of Hackett, Watson and Downer)and North Ainslie with either full capacity or below capacity as well as Lyneham High bursting at the seams with Campbell High not too far behind it. Not to mention parents who sent their children to private schools because of it.

By all means close the schools, but you’ll have to build more infrastructure at the schools you will still have open. And, it might not stem the tide of students leaving the Govt system, it may well encourage them to do so.

annie 1:50 pm 20 Apr 06

He can’t have much confidence that people will come to live in Canberra then, if he wants to close some schools.

bonfire 12:08 pm 20 Apr 06

i remain stunned that while delivering nothing of substance to the act after two terms in office, the gummint are deep in the red and are talking of school closures.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site