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The video that changed a Canberra wife’s thoughts on cycling

By Jenny Tiffen - 14 January 2016 24

the bakery bunch

I am a bike widow because I lose my husband to cycling MANY times a week. Not as many times as some women, but often enough for me to sometimes loathe the sport. Then I saw this video by Go Hard Productions. If you love/hate cycling or like pretty shots of Canberra, you MUST watch!

The Bakery Bunch meets every Saturday morning at Bicycle Centre – 14 Hindmarsh Drive Phillip.  It starts at 7am in the Winter and 6.30am in the Summer. Daylight savings changes mark the official change over time.

Newbies/rookies are welcome to come along and join, but they should know that it starts at moderate pace and slowly builds to FAST over the 65-70k loop. So, in other words, new people to the group are welcome, but if you are new to cycling, this isn’t for beginners.

This bunch has been going for 30 years! In fact this year marks it’s 30th birthday! There has been many different routes over time. Roads have changed, new suburbs have been built and Gungahlin simply keeps growing.

There is no contact person for the Bakery Bunch as such because it’s not an officially sanctioned ride. However you can find more information about cycling in Canberra on the Canberra Cycling Club website.

Are you into cycling? Maybe you are a widow like me?

Jenny Tiffen

What’s Your opinion?


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24 Responses to
The video that changed a Canberra wife’s thoughts on cycling
Postalgeek 11:29 am 25 Jan 16

miz said :

Jonno it may very well be infuriating. However pedestrians are always going to seem unpredictable to cyclists in the context of shared paths.
What you have to realise is that the walker’s mindset is quite different from the cyclist’s. Walking is relatively slow-paced and is an ‘automatic’ function, which means that in general a walker’s’ mind is not necessarily focusing on the actual walking but on all manner of other things (walking being known as a great de-stressor/anti-depressant for this reason).
In contrast, cyclists, being significantly faster, must apply somewhat more focus on their activity so they don’t run into things, lose balance, etc. Often they are also concentrating on fitness-related personal challenges which can be ‘stymied’ by those darn, pesky, walking people.
Because cyclists are much faster than pedestrians and relatively silent (unlike cars), on shared paths the onus is on cyclists to watch for pedestrians, not vice versa – though of course most pedestrians try to be courteous if they know you are there. A walker can accidentally ‘get in the way’ with one inadvertent step.
It simply isn’t reasonable to cane people for walking slightly askew on the basis that they ‘should have known’ a bike could have been roaring up behind them at any time! People are not robots and do not have an inbuilt rear vision mirror. Rules about how to walk would be rather Mussolini-esque!
If you prefer a more controlled environment with ‘rules,’ you can always ride on the road where laws apply to cars, cyclists and pedestrians. Though it is worth noting that pedestrians still have a general right of way on roads, for obvious safety reasons.

One simple rule, two words, whether you’re a pedestrian, cyclist, or driver – stay left. It’s not taxing, it’s not a distracting challenge, it doesn’t demand a lot of focus (for most people).

To call it ‘Mussolini-esque’ is hyperbole. It’s a basic common courtesy.

Ezy 8:39 am 24 Jan 16

Leon said :

A modern bicycle can travel 90 km in an hour. That’s 30 km/h faster than a ‘racing’ bike.

Bicycle racing is one of the few forms of racing in which contestants are restricted to a century-old design and are prohibited from using aerodynamic devices such as fairings.

The reason they travel in bunches is that weaker riders gain an aerodynamic advantage by slipstreaming stronger riders. This results in races in which nothing much happens except up hills (when slipstreaming offers less aerodynamic advantage) and in the final sprint to the finish line.

The America’s Cup moved into the twentieth century in the 1980s, when the kiwis won the right to use catamarans.

When will bicycle racing enter the twentieth century?

I am not agreeing with you at all.

Bikes have evolved over time to what they are today through modern engineering, technology and product development. If you look back to the first bikes to those of today – we have come a long way. The derailleur is a wonderful piece of engineering that allows the bike to have gears. Brakes have evolved from having none at all to hydraulic disc brakes. The material of which bikes are made – carbon, steel, titanium. Suspension on mountain bikes – the engineering that goes into these bikes is phenomenal. We are now seeing electrical shifting and more recently, wireless shifting!

Next time you are in a bike shop, ask to see their most expensive mountain bike and have a good look over and under it. Now ask them to see their lightest bike… how do you think that you are able to pick this bike up with your little finger? Hopefully by then you will understand that cycling is well into the twentieth century. There is only so much you can do before you start adding an engine to the bike.

Leon 7:05 am 24 Jan 16

A modern bicycle can travel 90 km in an hour. That’s 30 km/h faster than a ‘racing’ bike.

Bicycle racing is one of the few forms of racing in which contestants are restricted to a century-old design and are prohibited from using aerodynamic devices such as fairings.

The reason they travel in bunches is that weaker riders gain an aerodynamic advantage by slipstreaming stronger riders. This results in races in which nothing much happens except up hills (when slipstreaming offers less aerodynamic advantage) and in the final sprint to the finish line.

The America’s Cup moved into the twentieth century in the 1980s, when the kiwis won the right to use catamarans.

When will bicycle racing enter the twentieth century?

Leon 6:51 am 24 Jan 16

miz said :

…Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians.

And nobody ever has right of way over a bike.

Rule 19 of the ACT Road Rules says, “unless otherwise expressly stated in the Australian Road Rules, each reference in the Rules (except in this Division) to a driver includes a reference to a rider…”

and Rule 5 says, “There are a number of rules requiring a driver to give way to another driver or a pedestrian. However, under the Rules the other driver or pedestrian does not have a ‘right’ of way. Indeed, in some situations, a number of drivers may be required to give way to each other.”

miz 3:54 pm 23 Jan 16

Jonno it may very well be infuriating. However pedestrians are always going to seem unpredictable to cyclists in the context of shared paths.
What you have to realise is that the walker’s mindset is quite different from the cyclist’s. Walking is relatively slow-paced and is an ‘automatic’ function, which means that in general a walker’s’ mind is not necessarily focusing on the actual walking but on all manner of other things (walking being known as a great de-stressor/anti-depressant for this reason).
In contrast, cyclists, being significantly faster, must apply somewhat more focus on their activity so they don’t run into things, lose balance, etc. Often they are also concentrating on fitness-related personal challenges which can be ‘stymied’ by those darn, pesky, walking people.
Because cyclists are much faster than pedestrians and relatively silent (unlike cars), on shared paths the onus is on cyclists to watch for pedestrians, not vice versa – though of course most pedestrians try to be courteous if they know you are there. A walker can accidentally ‘get in the way’ with one inadvertent step.
It simply isn’t reasonable to cane people for walking slightly askew on the basis that they ‘should have known’ a bike could have been roaring up behind them at any time! People are not robots and do not have an inbuilt rear vision mirror. Rules about how to walk would be rather Mussolini-esque!
If you prefer a more controlled environment with ‘rules,’ you can always ride on the road where laws apply to cars, cyclists and pedestrians. Though it is worth noting that pedestrians still have a general right of way on roads, for obvious safety reasons.

Jono 9:28 pm 22 Jan 16

Postalgeek said :

If you’re on a shared path, you should be aware of your surrounds, behave predictably, and consider other users, irrespective of whether you are a pedestrian or a cyclist.

And that’s exactly what “sharing” a shared path comes down to. I’m on the shared paths virtually every day – running; walking; cycling, and have been doing so in Canberra for over 25 years. I have never, not once, as a pedestrian had a close call or a serious concern with a cyclist in that time. But I have the advantage over most in that I try to be considerate and alert at all times.

Jonny55 said :

Also I hate when you overtake a cyclist as they are too slow and then you turn around to suddenly see them sitting right behind you peddling furiously. Why where you not going that fast before? Male ego at its worst.

Yep, I encounter them too – and it’s not just males. It’s clearly an ego thing, and it’s weird.

Postalgeek 1:51 pm 22 Jan 16

miz said :

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

If you’re on a shared path, you should be aware of your surrounds, behave predictably, and consider other users, irrespective of whether you are a pedestrian or a cyclist. If you want to be oblivious while communing with nature, walk on the grass.

Jonny55 12:40 pm 22 Jan 16

Maya123 said :

miz said :

That’s the beauty of a soapbox: you can have your say here, whether others agree or not. I sometimes agree with you, Rubaiyat (e.g. about Mr Abbott) and other times, not. You might see my post on this thread as a whinge, but I am simply stating facts as I know it.
I can no longer enjoy walks along ‘shared spaces’ because of inconsiderate bike riders and owners of unleashed dogs. It is unpleasant always having to be on guard from lunatic riders and large, unleashed dogs. It rather detracts from the communing with nature.

There have always been plenty of bikes about. Yet there was not such an issue 20 years ago. Whereas these days there so many aggro PB type riders who just see pedestrians as ‘in the way’.

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

I find that when I keep on the very left edge of the shared paths I never have a problem with people cycling past; even the fast riders. I also check behind me before I make a change of direction. I am amazed sometimes that I have to remind others walking with me to move to the left, as they will be in the way of any person on a bike coming up behind them. I also sometimes come face to face with other pedestrians walking on the wrong side of the path, and a few seem unwilling to change the side of the path, as though they are trying to force me to walk on the right side. Fortunately they are not common.
Long leads on dogs are a problem. Actually the dogs should be on the left of the pedestrian and off the path, on a shot lead.

As someone that rides to work everyday pedestrians that don’t stick to the left hand side is infuriating.
Especially if it is in an area that a lot of people are cycling wont they have to constantly be walking back and forth into the correct lane each time a cyclist wants to pass.

It like if a motorist suddenly decided ‘to hell with this i’m going to drive on the right hand side of the road today and everyone else can just drive around me’.

The worst is if you ring your bell and they turn around and glare at you like your in the wrong.

Also people walking there dogs with long leads that take up both side of the path. Seriously what is with that. Even if I ring my bell in advance the dog will still often be startled with the owner violent yanking them to the correct side of the path or the lead will be to long so still not be enough room for me to pass.

Also I hate when you overtake a cyclist as they are too slow and then you turn around to suddenly see them sitting right behind you peddling furiously. Why where you not going that fast before? Male ego at its worst. I’m not competing in the Tour De France here either overtake me again and then return to your normal slow pace speed once again or give me space.

Maya123 1:48 am 22 Jan 16

Maya123 said :

miz said :

That’s the beauty of a soapbox: you can have your say here, whether others agree or not. I sometimes agree with you, Rubaiyat (e.g. about Mr Abbott) and other times, not. You might see my post on this thread as a whinge, but I am simply stating facts as I know it.
I can no longer enjoy walks along ‘shared spaces’ because of inconsiderate bike riders and owners of unleashed dogs. It is unpleasant always having to be on guard from lunatic riders and large, unleashed dogs. It rather detracts from the communing with nature.

There have always been plenty of bikes about. Yet there was not such an issue 20 years ago. Whereas these days there so many aggro PB type riders who just see pedestrians as ‘in the way’.

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

I find that when I keep on the very left edge of the shared paths I never have a problem with people cycling past; even the fast riders. I also check behind me before I make a change of direction. I am amazed sometimes that I have to remind others walking with me to move to the left, as they will be in the way of any person on a bike coming up behind them. I also sometimes come face to face with other pedestrians walking on the wrong side of the path, and a few seem unwilling to change the side of the path, as though they are trying to force me to walk on the right side. Fortunately they are not common.
Long leads on dogs are a problem. Actually the dogs should be on the left of the pedestrian and off the path, on a shot lead.

Oops, that’s ‘short’, not ‘shot’.

Maya123 1:46 am 22 Jan 16

miz said :

That’s the beauty of a soapbox: you can have your say here, whether others agree or not. I sometimes agree with you, Rubaiyat (e.g. about Mr Abbott) and other times, not. You might see my post on this thread as a whinge, but I am simply stating facts as I know it.
I can no longer enjoy walks along ‘shared spaces’ because of inconsiderate bike riders and owners of unleashed dogs. It is unpleasant always having to be on guard from lunatic riders and large, unleashed dogs. It rather detracts from the communing with nature.

There have always been plenty of bikes about. Yet there was not such an issue 20 years ago. Whereas these days there so many aggro PB type riders who just see pedestrians as ‘in the way’.

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

I find that when I keep on the very left edge of the shared paths I never have a problem with people cycling past; even the fast riders. I also check behind me before I make a change of direction. I am amazed sometimes that I have to remind others walking with me to move to the left, as they will be in the way of any person on a bike coming up behind them. I also sometimes come face to face with other pedestrians walking on the wrong side of the path, and a few seem unwilling to change the side of the path, as though they are trying to force me to walk on the right side. Fortunately they are not common.
Long leads on dogs are a problem. Actually the dogs should be on the left of the pedestrian and off the path, on a shot lead.

rubaiyat 9:14 pm 19 Jan 16

miz said :

That’s the beauty of a soapbox: you can have your say here, whether others agree or not. I sometimes agree with you, Rubaiyat (e.g. about Mr Abbott) and other times, not. You might see my post on this thread as a whinge, but I am simply stating facts as I know it.
I can no longer enjoy walks along ‘shared spaces’ because of inconsiderate bike riders and owners of unleashed dogs. It is unpleasant always having to be on guard from lunatic riders and large, unleashed dogs. It rather detracts from the communing with nature.

There have always been plenty of bikes about. Yet there was not such an issue 20 years ago. Whereas these days there so many aggro PB type riders who just see pedestrians as ‘in the way’.

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

I apologise. Inconsiderate behavior is inconsiderate behavior.

This may simply be another symptom of Canberra’s growing pains. More people trying to enjoy limited resources.

We really need a Super Park like New York’s Central Park to accommodate us all. Public events and weekends are showing just how many locals want to get out and enjoy our City sometimes tripping over each other to do so.

Less neglect of our better existing parks would be a start.

miz 7:44 pm 18 Jan 16

That’s the beauty of a soapbox: you can have your say here, whether others agree or not. I sometimes agree with you, Rubaiyat (e.g. about Mr Abbott) and other times, not. You might see my post on this thread as a whinge, but I am simply stating facts as I know it.
I can no longer enjoy walks along ‘shared spaces’ because of inconsiderate bike riders and owners of unleashed dogs. It is unpleasant always having to be on guard from lunatic riders and large, unleashed dogs. It rather detracts from the communing with nature.

There have always been plenty of bikes about. Yet there was not such an issue 20 years ago. Whereas these days there so many aggro PB type riders who just see pedestrians as ‘in the way’.

Pedal Power needs to constantly remind its members that bikes NEVER have right of way over pedestrians – NEVER. Even if the pedestrian does something unexpected (probably because they are communing with nature, and do not hear or see the bike approaching because as we know, bikes are practically silent and seem to appear out of nowhere).

Maya123 6:34 pm 18 Jan 16

I enjoyed that. I wish I was young and fit enough to join them.

rubaiyat 8:48 am 17 Jan 16

miz said :

This encapsulates the problem drivers and pedestrians have with cyclists. Cycling has become an amateur sport and commuter activity for the obsessive compulsive, rather than simply a calm, green, mode of transport for all and sundry to get peacefully from A to B.
This kind of cycling puts many people off riding a bike. While not accusing those involved in this group, enthusiasts of this sort who are obsessed with their PBs tend to be the ones who spoil others’ enjoyment of shared paths through their inconsiderate behaviour.

They enjoy a sport that keeps them fit and healthy whilst doing no harm to anyone else and we have the usual whinging whining objections!

If they were going to be “Good Canberrans” they would be walking the dog on the leash whilst sitting in their moving car, like I saw some people do in Kambah.

miz 8:59 pm 16 Jan 16

This encapsulates the problem drivers and pedestrians have with cyclists. Cycling has become an amateur sport and commuter activity for the obsessive compulsive, rather than simply a calm, green, mode of transport for all and sundry to get peacefully from A to B.
This kind of cycling puts many people off riding a bike. While not accusing those involved in this group, enthusiasts of this sort who are obsessed with their PBs tend to be the ones who spoil others’ enjoyment of shared paths through their inconsiderate behaviour.

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