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Trinity Christian School

By PhilF - 19 November 2014 20

My family are moving to Canberra and I’m looking for some advice on a high school for my 11 year old son. So far he’s academic, sporty and arty too. I’d like to find a school that has broad and varied curriculum and extracurricular activities, good anti-bullying policy and is very inclusive and outward-looking in its approach. I notice that academically Trinity Christian School does as well as Grammar and Radford but at a fraction of the cost. However it does seem to have a very strong religious focus, which seems a lot stronger than what I’ve seen in the Catholic school system. Would welcome feedback.

What’s Your opinion?


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20 Responses to
Trinity Christian School
Elamishka 10:17 pm 22 Feb 16

Just wondering if this thread is still current? Does trinity maintain an anti gay marriage policy? my daughter’s godfather is gay and, although I like the academic achievement, and have no problem with the religious side of the curriculum, I want her exposed to and taught acceptance of diversity- gender, race, and sexual orientation.

Would really like to hear the thought of current trinity parents

HenryBG 5:33 pm 03 Oct 15

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

RiotFrog said :

You people are hilarious; enrolling your kids in a *religious* school and then complaining that the curriculum includes religious education. Wow.

+1.

You’d think the name of the school would give it away.

A parent at a Catholic school in Canberra 2 years ago complained to the school because the religious teaching her children were receiving conflicted with her muslim religion.

Some people just live in their own little bubble…

HenryBG 5:29 pm 03 Oct 15

Wasn’t it Trinity that banned Harry Potter from its school library on the basis that the book promoted witchcraft?

nonsense85 3:04 pm 03 Oct 15

As someone who has had the best of both worlds, Trinity is a good school unless you do not go to church and your child wants to go for a leadership position. Grammar, on the other hand, does not specify that a child should go to church to become a leader, only that they should be involved should be part of the school community.
Both school are visually nice, though Grammar is a lot bigger and has a lot more stairs than Trinity does.
Trinity is very open that they do show prejudice to those who come from church going families.
Both schools support Academic, Artistic and Athletic strengths.

Talkative 9:48 pm 31 Jan 15

Trinity is very religious, many of the teachers are great but do be aware that if you are not a church goer then your son will never get the opportunity to hold a leadership role in this school.

mikal 12:31 pm 21 Nov 14

sportsmum said :

As the parent of two Trinity kids I can tell you that the “mass” and “church” requirement you are worried about is non-existent. Formal religious education is similar to what is offered in Catholic schools, but less time. Non-believers and children from culturally diverse backgrounds are welcomed. All the focus in terms of religious education is values based and I am completely fine with that. As a family, you are expected to support the values of the school but you will not be expected to go to church. Children who don’t support these values are asked to leave the school.

The anti-bullying policy is real and enforced by teachers at every level. The opportunities to study a variety of electives is there, the value for money is excellent. As someone who considered all options, I found that Trinity offered everything and more that Grammar offered. We are very happy there. I highly recommend it.

So, I’m a parent of Trinity kids as well, and I don’t think this is 100% correct.

Every parent session I’ve been to has started with prayer, as has every assembly. I am regularly told by the teachers that they did in class prayer with students as well, so its not just limited times of the week that religion is mentioned.

If you’re opposed to religion, then I don’t think you’d be happy as a parent of kids at Trinity. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that to be honest — just go to a secular school if that’s what you’re after.

Also, if you’re considering Trinity for years 6 – 8, you should be aware that the purchase of an Apple iPad (specific models, not just an iPad mini) is compulsory. You also bear the risk of the child damaging the device, so you’re basically self insured for three years.

On another note, I am also a graduate of Canberra Grammar. Whilst Anglican, that school is _much_ less religious than Trinity. So, if you’ve got lots of money and want a private school, perhaps consider there?

Madam Cholet 9:39 am 20 Nov 14

RiotFrog said :

You people are hilarious; enrolling your kids in a *religious* school and then complaining that the curriculum includes religious education. Wow.

The school name is ‘Trinity Christian School’, which indicates to me a broad religious education. I was stating that what I have heard outside of the school (so not from the school directly), since we put his name down is a bit concerning, including the anti-gay stuff.

Far from not getting the ‘Christian’ thing in the title, I (and It seems the OP) are concerned about the depth of the emphasis on religion rather than a broad emphasis on christian values.

I was brought up in a Catholic family and went to a Catholic primary school, with church going being a regular part of my earlier years at home and at school, but I was not told what I should believe at any stage. I’d like my own child to understand religion and its various aspects, but don’t need him to be brainwashed. Children are remarkably quick to take stuff on board so it needs to be done the right way. And you don’t want the religious part of things to overtake the academic part.

My son already tells me occasionally at the age of 6 he believes in God, which is fine, but proves the point that they absorb stuff you have no control over. I’ve always provided him with an explanation that says that it’s ok to believe and it’s ok not to (as per Mum and Dad).

Thanks Sportsmum for your post – really helpful.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 9:05 am 20 Nov 14

RiotFrog said :

You people are hilarious; enrolling your kids in a *religious* school and then complaining that the curriculum includes religious education. Wow.

+1.

You’d think the name of the school would give it away.

Southmouth 8:31 am 20 Nov 14

I have several children there. I enrolled there because i wanted a Christian education for them. I have been disappointed at how watered down the christianity is in the student culture. I have been involved in two other Christian schools in other parts of the country and this one is definately weakest in this area. (so you will probably be ok with it)
If you are looking at the yr12 results, be aware (i wasn’t) that only a smallish subset of the yr10 students continue on to yr12 there. Many do yr11 and 12 elsewhere so the yr12 results don’t accurately reflect the broarder results of the junior and intermediate education as a whole.

Isn’t enrolling in a Christian school and complaining about the christian elements kinda like going in the army and complaining about the guns?

Masquara 7:26 am 20 Nov 14

OpenYourMind said :

From memory, this is the school that had the anti gay marriage policy. That alone would be enough to put me off it.

To the extent that alumni started a pro-gay-marriage facebook page in protest …

OpenYourMind 10:18 pm 19 Nov 14

From memory, this is the school that had the anti gay marriage policy. That alone would be enough to put me off it.

sportsmum 8:05 pm 19 Nov 14

As the parent of two Trinity kids I can tell you that the “mass” and “church” requirement you are worried about is non-existent. Formal religious education is similar to what is offered in Catholic schools, but less time. Non-believers and children from culturally diverse backgrounds are welcomed. All the focus in terms of religious education is values based and I am completely fine with that. As a family, you are expected to support the values of the school but you will not be expected to go to church. Children who don’t support these values are asked to leave the school.

The anti-bullying policy is real and enforced by teachers at every level. The opportunities to study a variety of electives is there, the value for money is excellent. As someone who considered all options, I found that Trinity offered everything and more that Grammar offered. We are very happy there. I highly recommend it.

RiotFrog 3:45 pm 19 Nov 14

You people are hilarious; enrolling your kids in a *religious* school and then complaining that the curriculum includes religious education. Wow.

pink little birdie 2:41 pm 19 Nov 14

Are you looking at the public schools? The school system here is a bit different and Canberra schools tend to have a similar demographic unless it’s the really to the grammar and Radford.
What region? I would just head to the public college for year 11 and 12. Colleges here are year 11 and 12 only and don’t tend to have bullying.
Go for one outside a town centre if you aren’t sure about how well he will handle the less structured enviroment of year 11 and 12 in the ACT

Madam Cholet 12:31 pm 19 Nov 14

We have our 6 year old registered to go there when he is 8. I have the same thoughts as you – I’m happy that they are academically as good as the highest fee paying schools in Canberra, but not that happy about their religious pursuits. If you look at the numbers in Grammer and the numbers at Trinity, Trinity comes out even better.

From talking to ex-students, who are all consistently extraordinarily nice and accomplished individuals, it is pretty full-on in terms of religious education, and that you have to live through it, i.e. go to mass, participate in prayers etc. It is hard to cut through the commentary sometimes, but it does concern me that it could be bordering on brainwashing! I’m starting to have second thoughts about it as frankly if you are not religious (and I was brought up in a catholic family), your fees are funding education and beliefs you don’t subscribe to.

I have visited the school and like I said, it’s a lovely place and the headmaster seemed reasonable, although the subsequent feedback is slightly different. I did get a bit concerned also about his apparent stance on homosexuality (he wrote to parents to state the case against basically a few years ago – or so the Crimes & the ABC would have you believe).

I would be interested to know others thoughts too.

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