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Trouble at the markets?

By johnboy 21 June 2013 36

The ABC has a strange complaint about the Saturday Farmers Market getting too many punters in which is somehow bad for business:

Beef and lamb producer Phil McCormack, from Crookwell on the NSW Southern Tablelands, says his market sales have fallen by 25 per cent in the last 18 months.

Mr McCormack says the weekly event is no longer a traditional farmers market and management needs to rethink its approach.

“People are sitting around and it’s getting in the road of people who want to just come in and buy and go home,” he said.

“I think we need to get back to the roots of what a genuine farmers market is and it’s genuine farmers.

“They take the elements, they take drought, they take floods, they take fire, they take everything into account, where the people that cook in their houses and do whatever they do in their houses, they don’t take anything like that into account.”

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Trouble at the markets?
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Phil123 7:40 pm 24 Jun 13

It won’t matter soon because there will not be many genuine farmers left. It will be for who ever what’s to pay for a stall. The people running this market have got to work with stallholders so this does not happen. Start listening. Before it’s all to late

Madam Cholet 12:49 pm 24 Jun 13

damien haas said :

cbjcurtin said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m always surprised by people’s capacity to believe that just because it comes from the farmers market that it is fresh, organic, better for us. From what I can see there is no requirement by the these markets for producers to demonstrate that their food is locally grown, not sprayed yesterday etc etc. I’ve certainly purchased stuff there, but I’m surprised that in the type of environment we live in these days in which we are regulated to within an inch of our lives concerning public health, that there is not more scrutiny.

There are some organic producers at the market, but it’s best to check, they have to have their certification displayed if they are selling organic produce. If its not certified organic, it’s grown conventionally using chemicals.

Low spray

Organic fertilizers used

And chemical free

Are marketing terms.

That said not everyone is looking for organic produce, and there are some great conventional growers at these markets, including Joe Vassello from Mowbray Park Produce and Others

All food is organic.

Well yes. But what most people don’t realise is that some chemicals are also organic and can be used in the production of ‘organic’ produce. Not all chemicals are synthetic. And with any chemical or item that you put on food during its production there needs to be time-frames that are adhered to before you can eat it – or in this case, send it to market. As far as I can see, the produce at the market undergoes no testing or QA process as the produce in the normal retail stream does. To get your produce into Woolies, for example, you need to be part of a QA program. Not saying it’s bullet-proof, just sayin.

Terra 10:45 am 24 Jun 13

It seems the world is filling with “In The Way People”. The malls, roads and carparks, now the markets. Those mindless wanderers with no spacial awareness who just plonk, or plod along totally oblivious of the carnage they cause around them.

And now here, it appears the markets are quickly becoming another haunt for the mindlessly ignorant.

Maybe the scope needs to be widened, maybe we, as a society need to start thinking about our impact on others, need to consider the inconvienances that mindless inaction causes others, or, at the very least, be mindful and apologetic when it’s unavoidable.

In the way people. Are you one of them?

dtc 10:20 am 24 Jun 13

Masquara said :

At least there’s some economic activity IN Canberra with the chocolate “reshaping”. Aforementioned Pilpel food importers don’t contribute a cent to the regional economy other than their stall fee. They combine their pre-processed ingredients in Sydney.

Yeah, thats at least 3 times you have mentioned Pilpel. Why dont you describe what your issue is

Spiral 9:20 am 24 Jun 13

damien haas said :

All food is organic.

Unless you count salt as food.

Masquara 10:44 pm 23 Jun 13

pepmeup said :

What about local hand made chocolates? Grown in South America, processed in Europe, re shaped in Canberra and sold at the farmers markets.

At least there’s some economic activity IN Canberra with the chocolate “reshaping”. Aforementioned Pilpel food importers don’t contribute a cent to the regional economy other than their stall fee. They combine their pre-processed ingredients in Sydney.

Pork Hunt 9:42 pm 23 Jun 13

damien haas said :

cbjcurtin said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m always surprised by people’s capacity to believe that just because it comes from the farmers market that it is fresh, organic, better for us. From what I can see there is no requirement by the these markets for producers to demonstrate that their food is locally grown, not sprayed yesterday etc etc. I’ve certainly purchased stuff there, but I’m surprised that in the type of environment we live in these days in which we are regulated to within an inch of our lives concerning public health, that there is not more scrutiny.

There are some organic producers at the market, but it’s best to check, they have to have their certification displayed if they are selling organic produce. If its not certified organic, it’s grown conventionally using chemicals.

Low spray

Organic fertilizers used

And chemical free

Are marketing terms.

That said not everyone is looking for organic produce, and there are some great conventional growers at these markets, including Joe Vassello from Mowbray Park Produce and Others

All food is organic.

Including cheesy poofs?

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=cheesy+poofs

damien haas 6:47 pm 23 Jun 13

cbjcurtin said :

Madam Cholet said :

I’m always surprised by people’s capacity to believe that just because it comes from the farmers market that it is fresh, organic, better for us. From what I can see there is no requirement by the these markets for producers to demonstrate that their food is locally grown, not sprayed yesterday etc etc. I’ve certainly purchased stuff there, but I’m surprised that in the type of environment we live in these days in which we are regulated to within an inch of our lives concerning public health, that there is not more scrutiny.

There are some organic producers at the market, but it’s best to check, they have to have their certification displayed if they are selling organic produce. If its not certified organic, it’s grown conventionally using chemicals.

Low spray

Organic fertilizers used

And chemical free

Are marketing terms.

That said not everyone is looking for organic produce, and there are some great conventional growers at these markets, including Joe Vassello from Mowbray Park Produce and Others

All food is organic.

pepmeup 6:35 pm 23 Jun 13

What about local hand made chocolates? Grown in South America, processed in Europe, re shaped in Canberra and sold at the farmers markets.

Re red caps, you can keep picking already ripe caps off a vine once winter starts but they stop producing new flowers, so yes you get one crop but not enough to sell each week at a market.

The farmers markets website has addresses for the farmers look them up on google earth/maps check it out and see if it looks like a commercial farm.

Masquara 11:58 am 23 Jun 13

michcon said :

Food miles, and supporting the local economy is an important concept for some market goers and if they are going to be a bit relaxed about the geographical definition of the “capital region” then it should be stated nice and clear.

Two of the producers listed as legitimate marketeers are from 1100 and 1200 kilometres away … far northern NSW. I appreciate that if consumers want them, provision of tropical fruits has to be from far away, and if they are legitimate Australian producers I don’t personally care about the distance.

However, I do care about the Pilpel/Darikay company passing themselves off as producers of Australian food. The market rules should be applied, and the organisers should concentrate on kicking out folks like “Pilpel” who are making dips out of imported ingredients. The “Pilpel” case gives the impression that the “farmer’s” market is simply prepared to accommodate anyone who will turn a buck for them and pay for a space.

michcon 2:17 am 23 Jun 13

michcon said :

Masquara said :

Question was asked on 666 yesterday re the market: where are those ripe red capsicums on sale at this time of the season being grown? Not locally. Queensland was the commenter’s thesis. What IS the farmer’s market policy? I thought it was only for local growers?

Hmm, I was actually pulling capsicums off my backyard plants only a month ago, it really should be an impossible concept that they’d be grown in Sydney, or under a poly tunnel/hothouse. I have provided feedback to the market organisers before though – each stall holder should display a sign that states how far away the food is grown. Food miles, and supporting the local economy is an important concept for some market goers and if they are going to be a bit relaxed about the geographical definition of the “capital region” then it should be stated nice and clear.

Sorry – should NOT be an impossible concept.

michcon 2:16 am 23 Jun 13

michcon said :

Masquara said :

Question was asked on 666 yesterday re the market: where are those ripe red capsicums on sale at this time of the season being grown? Not locally. Queensland was the commenter’s thesis. What IS the farmer’s market policy? I thought it was only for local growers?

Hmm, I was actually pulling capsicums off my backyard plants only a month ago, it really should be an impossible concept that they’d be grown in Sydney, or under a poly tunnel/hothouse. I have provided feedback to the market organisers before though – each stall holder should display a sign that states how far away the food is grown. Food miles, and supporting the local economy is an important concept for some market goers and if they are going to be a bit relaxed about the geographical definition of the “capital region” then it should be stated nice and clear.

michcon 2:14 am 23 Jun 13

Masquara said :

Question was asked on 666 yesterday re the market: where are those ripe red capsicums on sale at this time of the season being grown? Not locally. Queensland was the commenter’s thesis. What IS the farmer’s market policy? I thought it was only for local growers?

Hmm, I was actually pulling capsicums off my backyard plants only a month ago, it really should be an impossible concept that they’d be grown in Sydney, or under a poly tunnel/hothouse. I have provided feedback to the market organisers before though – each stall holder should display a sign that states how far away the food is grown. Food miles, and supporting the local economy is an important concept for some market goers and if they are going to be a bit relaxed about the geographical definition of the “capital region” then it should be stated nice and clear.

moneypenny2612 7:48 pm 22 Jun 13

Madam Cholet said :

I’m always surprised by people’s capacity to believe that just because it comes from the farmers market that it is fresh, organic, better for us. From what I can see there is no requirement by the these markets for producers to demonstrate that their food is locally grown, not sprayed yesterday etc etc. I’ve certainly purchased stuff there, but I’m surprised that in the type of environment we live in these days in which we are regulated to within an inch of our lives concerning public health, that there is not more scrutiny.

Market rules are here: http://www.capitalregionfarmersmarket.com.au/downloads.html

While the managing committee does have some discretion about how large the ‘local’ region is (eg, there are pie makers and smallgoods stallholders who drive up from northern Victoria fortnightly), it is not unheard of for a stallholder to be ejected if they misrepresent the provenance of the products they sell.

I can think of at least two instances where stallholders were ejected because they claimed to be selling on behalf of regional growers when in fact they got their produce from a commercial wholesaler who supplies supermarkets.

cbjcurtin 6:58 pm 22 Jun 13

Madam Cholet said :

I’m always surprised by people’s capacity to believe that just because it comes from the farmers market that it is fresh, organic, better for us. From what I can see there is no requirement by the these markets for producers to demonstrate that their food is locally grown, not sprayed yesterday etc etc. I’ve certainly purchased stuff there, but I’m surprised that in the type of environment we live in these days in which we are regulated to within an inch of our lives concerning public health, that there is not more scrutiny.

There are some organic producers at the market, but it’s best to check, they have to have their certification displayed if they are selling organic produce. If its not certified organic, it’s grown conventionally using chemicals.

Low spray

Organic fertilizers used

And chemical free

Are marketing terms.

That said not everyone is looking for organic produce, and there are some great conventional growers at these markets, including Joe Vassello from Mowbray Park Produce and Others

Masquara 6:20 pm 22 Jun 13

“Pilpel Fine Foods” are listed as a producer. They are NOT. Their products are marked “made in Australia” not “product of Australia”. Absolute lie.

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