Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Recruiting experts in
Accountancy & Finance

Waldorf Wankers Whingeing (Still)

By 54-11 - 21 June 2010 32

I see in yesterday’s Crimes that the residents and managers of the Waldorf Apartments are still whingeing about the noise of live venue music.  The reality is, folks, that noise has been there for many years, was there before the apartments were built, and you knew about it before you moved in.

This whole “order of occupancy” issue has been ignored for years by ACTPLA.  I wrote several submissions over many years suggesting that they enshrine such a principle in legislation but they just let it slide.  Nor did ACTPLA ever impose conditions on apartment developers to ensure that adequate noise insulation was installed.

And now, surprise, surprise, the whingers are closing down music venues.  It’s all wrong.

Many jurisdictions/countries have gone through/ are going through this issue.  One example is where residential land encroaches on agricultural holdings, and then residents start moaning about farm smells and noises.  Well, the reality is that these activities were there first, and these johnny-come-latelies have to accept these pre-existing rights.

I don’t agree with much of what the Snow family does or says, but I can understand why they would want to block the Tralee development – over time, the whingers will start to moan about the noise over property, when that noise was there to start with.  We need to have proper protection for earlier occupants to continue to enjoy their properties, within reason, as these activities were there when the later occupants purchased/moved in.  And that principle should also apply to inappropriate hi-rise developments in suburban areas.

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
32 Responses to
Waldorf Wankers Whingeing (Still)
millie 1:42 pm 21 Jun 10

Some people seem to think the live music was there before the Waldorf – not so. The Waldorf was the old Westpac Bank and the Waldorf’s foyer was once the Singapore Airlines office. When the Waldorf was built there was no live music venue in the area.

georgesgenitals 1:33 pm 21 Jun 10

Jim Jones said :

georgesgenitals said :

Jim Jones said :

georgesgenitals said :

It’s a nice whinge, but like the OP said, it’s been discussed before and nothing’s changed. Sure, ‘live music’ was there first, but it’s still bloody noisy for people trying to sleep there. Don’t forget, quite a few units there are serviced apartments, so the people sleeping there will often be visitors to Canberra without the benefit of local knowledge.

If you book a serviced apartment in the middle of Sydney, you know what to expect. I know that Canberra isn’t exactly in the same league – but it’s the same kind of principle.

You can’t expect to live or stay in the centre of the city without there being some noise.

Absolutely. The question is whether you are experiencing ‘some noise’ though, or a loud enough thumping that precludes all but chemically induced sleep.

Agreed.

However, I would state that if the noise is so loud that it precludes sleep, then the onus be on the apartment owners to supply adequate sound proofing, rather than forcing entertainment venues to shut down.

I spend a lot of time in serviced apartments in the Sydney CBD, and they’re very well soundproofed (you’d be crazy not to). I suspect that the Waldorf (and other inner city apartment complexes) has skimped on this and is looking to force venues to close rather than do what they should have done in the first place and properly soundproof their apartments.

I also spend time in Sydney for work, and the apartments there are definitely better soundproofed, and that does make a lot of difference.

54-11 1:17 pm 21 Jun 10

Exactly JJ and Buzz. It just needs the stroke of a (ACTPLA) pen and the problem is solved.

Well, unless the buildings are certified by one of the many dodgy certifiers who are paid by, and captive to, the developer. What a bunch of shonks they are (developers and certifiers, that is).

Buzz2600 1:17 pm 21 Jun 10

Right Jim Jones … plenty of other cities manage this issue through proper building design and soundproofing enabling bars and residents to coexist.

Having made the poor decision to purchase sub-standard apartments, Waldorf residents now want pre-existing businesses around them to quieten down or shut up shop so they can ensure their property value keeps growing. What happened to the principle of “buyer beware”?

Buzz2600 1:02 pm 21 Jun 10

Its about zoning and building design regulations. I have no sympathy for the Waldorf. They should have constructed a sound proof building if they wanted to set up shop in the inner city right next door to these pre-existing businesses. Why should venues constantly comply with increasingly prescriptive laws when they are not in a residential zone? It spells the end of a vibrant inner city area if Waldorf wins this battle.

Jim Jones 12:38 pm 21 Jun 10

georgesgenitals said :

Jim Jones said :

georgesgenitals said :

It’s a nice whinge, but like the OP said, it’s been discussed before and nothing’s changed. Sure, ‘live music’ was there first, but it’s still bloody noisy for people trying to sleep there. Don’t forget, quite a few units there are serviced apartments, so the people sleeping there will often be visitors to Canberra without the benefit of local knowledge.

If you book a serviced apartment in the middle of Sydney, you know what to expect. I know that Canberra isn’t exactly in the same league – but it’s the same kind of principle.

You can’t expect to live or stay in the centre of the city without there being some noise.

Absolutely. The question is whether you are experiencing ‘some noise’ though, or a loud enough thumping that precludes all but chemically induced sleep.

Agreed.

However, I would state that if the noise is so loud that it precludes sleep, then the onus be on the apartment owners to supply adequate sound proofing, rather than forcing entertainment venues to shut down.

I spend a lot of time in serviced apartments in the Sydney CBD, and they’re very well soundproofed (you’d be crazy not to). I suspect that the Waldorf (and other inner city apartment complexes) has skimped on this and is looking to force venues to close rather than do what they should have done in the first place and properly soundproof their apartments.

georgesgenitals 12:27 pm 21 Jun 10

Jim Jones said :

georgesgenitals said :

It’s a nice whinge, but like the OP said, it’s been discussed before and nothing’s changed. Sure, ‘live music’ was there first, but it’s still bloody noisy for people trying to sleep there. Don’t forget, quite a few units there are serviced apartments, so the people sleeping there will often be visitors to Canberra without the benefit of local knowledge.

If you book a serviced apartment in the middle of Sydney, you know what to expect. I know that Canberra isn’t exactly in the same league – but it’s the same kind of principle.

You can’t expect to live or stay in the centre of the city without there being some noise.

Absolutely. The question is whether you are experiencing ‘some noise’ though, or a loud enough thumping that precludes all but chemically induced sleep.

Inappropriate 11:51 am 21 Jun 10

It’s not rocket science to canvas the neighbourhood and find out what, if any, noise issues there may be.

People who move into noisy places deserve what they get.

Jim Jones 11:20 am 21 Jun 10

georgesgenitals said :

It’s a nice whinge, but like the OP said, it’s been discussed before and nothing’s changed. Sure, ‘live music’ was there first, but it’s still bloody noisy for people trying to sleep there. Don’t forget, quite a few units there are serviced apartments, so the people sleeping there will often be visitors to Canberra without the benefit of local knowledge.

If you book a serviced apartment in the middle of Sydney, you know what to expect. I know that Canberra isn’t exactly in the same league – but it’s the same kind of principle.

You can’t expect to live or stay in the centre of the city without there being some noise.

georgesgenitals 11:02 am 21 Jun 10

It’s a nice whinge, but like the OP said, it’s been discussed before and nothing’s changed. Sure, ‘live music’ was there first, but it’s still bloody noisy for people trying to sleep there. Don’t forget, quite a few units there are serviced apartments, so the people sleeping there will often be visitors to Canberra without the benefit of local knowledge.

Holden Caulfield 10:55 am 21 Jun 10

Nah, I think Deadly is off the mark here. I do appreciate that it is difficult for prospective buyers to get a full understanding of the ambient noise levels prior to buying an apartment. But this is where you would hope common sense might prevail and the prospective buyers would at least make some sort of effort to accept the responsibility of finding out for themselves what the noise might be like.

I know it may not be possible to get a full understanding, but as has been highlighted, you can’t take the word of a real estate agent in this context. A simple grasp on reality might also revel the high likelihood that living across the road from a live music venue in the middle of the city might bring with it some noise concerns.

It’s not bloody rocket science; why must we continue to pander to the people who cannot accept responsibility for their purchasing decisions. True, there may be occasions where the full facts of a property purchase are not known until after settlement. However, buying a unit over the road from a music venue and then complaining that the venue is noisy is not one of them.

Muttsybignuts 10:41 am 21 Jun 10

Sure, it is hard to gauge true noise levels however just standing on the corner near the Waldorf and looking around should give a fair indication that it isn’t going to be be silent and peaceful. There are bars and back packers and traffic and heaps of people. Only an idiot would expect to move in and have tranquillity. If you want that, move to the country. If you want the hustle and bustle of living in a city, move to the city and stop crying like a whiny little b*tch when the sounds of a vibrant city life disturb the life you knew you were getting!

indigoid 10:40 am 21 Jun 10

DeadlySchnauzer, it isn’t rocket surgery, FFS. All they need to do is take a walk along the prospective street a few times at night, particularly Fridays and weekends, (said gigs are usually at night, after all) before buying an apartment there. Any noise should be quite evident. IMHO anyone whinging about this after the fact is an idiot and should have done their research first.

After a year of living in Sydney (Hurstville region) with my bedroom windows open wide all night I am no longer woken up by any of the following:

– 3am street sweeper vehicles crawling past at least once a week (seems like a silly time to do it, the street is lined with cars!)

– pub brawls and other drunken antics with associated shouting

– gunshots (allegedly)

– fire trucks regularly leaving the fire station (100m from my bedroom) with sirens and lights on

Ignorance is bliss 🙂

54-11 10:38 am 21 Jun 10

Deadly, you’re right to a limited extent only. An apartment block right in the middle of a busy city next to all sorts of venues should ring all sorts of alarm bells, so to speak. Anyone sensitive to noise levels such as this should carry out proper due diligence.

A search on RA, for example, will show that this has been discussed before.

There’s no lack of information available to anyone who wants to check it out first.

Personally, I would never want to live there, because you’ve just got to walk down the street to get a pretty good idea of what it would be like.

DeadlySchnauzer 10:11 am 21 Jun 10

I would tend to agree, but I think there is one caveat you have to acknowledge. It’s very hard for prospective buyers to get a true idea of noise levels before moving in. You can be guaranteed that any real estate agent selling inner city apartments will spruik the hell out of the fact that “oh this apartment is fully noise insulated, its so quiet in here etc”. And you can also be sure that the specific times the apartment is open and on display prior to sale will be during “off peak” noise times. Unless buyers are allowed to camp out in an apartment over night for a few days, it will be almost impossible for them to get a true idea of the noise levels they are buying in to.

This is where the whole “oh people knew about the noise and moved in anyway” argument breaks down. And its one that is very hard to address (unless perhaps we start introducing compulsory noise reports along with building inspections).

1 2 3

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site