Wentworth Ave – g-doonk … g-doonk … g-doonk

Amanda Hugankis 1 December 2010 29

Hoping to draw on the collective wisdom of Rioters.

Does anyone know why Wentworth Avenue (Kingston) is the only road in Canberra to have been laid in pieces, causing your passage along it to be chorused with ‘g-doonk-g-doonk … g-doonk-gdoonk … g-doonk-gdoonk’?


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29 Responses to Wentworth Ave – g-doonk … g-doonk … g-doonk
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Jim Jones Jim Jones 3:21 pm 02 Dec 10

Thumper said :

It’s the mating call of the rare eastern spotted lesser grebelet.

It’s characteristic call is gadoonk, gadoonk.

The female then usually replies with her, equally characteristic call which sounds something like farkov, farkov, farcov…

I believe the eastern spotted lesser grebelet were hunted to extinction by the Fuccarwee people, a tribe of 4-foot-high pygymies who would hunt in the 5-foot-high grasses of their homeland, calling out the battle-cry: ‘We’re the Fuccarwee’.

troll-sniffer troll-sniffer 3:05 pm 02 Dec 10

Ceej1973 said :

Jim Jones said :

Solidarity said :

troll-sniffer said :

funny stuff

You’re not funny.

Yes he is.

You try working with him!?!

Since when did an assessor ever work? Mein freund.

Thumper Thumper 8:11 am 02 Dec 10

It’s the mating call of the rare eastern spotted lesser grebelet.

It’s characteristic call is gadoonk, gadoonk.

The female then usually replies with her, equally characteristic call which sounds something like farkov, farkov, farcov…

Ceej1973 Ceej1973 10:55 pm 01 Dec 10

Jim Jones said :

Solidarity said :

troll-sniffer said :

funny stuff

You’re not funny.

Yes he is.

You try working with him!?!

2620watcher 2620watcher 9:37 pm 01 Dec 10

colourful sydney racing identity said :

to lay down some sick beats while you let loose with some dope free-stylin’ rhymes to impress your crew?

Explains why the Red P-platers drive so fast down there. They obviously need the speed to crank it up to 120 beats per min….

olfella olfella 5:03 pm 01 Dec 10

phil m said :

I think TAMS should just get over whatever historical mumbo jumbo is being hung on to, tear it all up and resurface with that lovely hot-mix ashphalt.

Oh and the shoulders could be a lot safer too. Not as if there isn’t enough space along the verge/median strip.

It really is a substandard road by today’s standards.

Dont forget this is the same people that bought up the GDE….

astrojax astrojax 4:24 pm 01 Dec 10

Keijidosha said :

Phil, most new roads being constructed in the ACT these days are substandard, so repaving Wentworth Avenue would likely achieve nothing.

are you saying road crews should be sectioned?

Jim Jones Jim Jones 3:48 pm 01 Dec 10

Solidarity said :

troll-sniffer said :

funny stuff

You’re not funny.

Yes he is.

Keijidosha Keijidosha 3:40 pm 01 Dec 10

Phil, most new roads being constructed in the ACT these days are substandard, so repaving Wentworth Avenue would likely achieve nothing.

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 3:09 pm 01 Dec 10

Solidarity said :

troll-sniffer said :

This was a little known kow-tow to Walter Burley Griffin. In his homeland, the US, many of the roads were laid in concrete slabs separated by the g-doonk-gdoonk gaps, and it was felt that WBG would feel more at home and be more likely to stay and see out the project if he didn’t get homesick.

The strips were not expansion joints as is commonly believed. They were actually a clever device to aid the early motorist in speed monitoring, as early cars rarely had speedos and they mostly were unreliable, so the canny motorist could count the number of g-doonk-gdoonk gaps in 15 seconds, refer to the chart taped to their dashboard (where the speedo now sits) and make a crude but often accurate estimation of their speed.

At each end of the section of road equipped with the g-doonk-gdoonk gaps system, there were extra wide gaps that made a g-dwonk-gthump sound, quite different to the g-doonk-gdoonk sound, and this was referred to as the point to point speed estimation system.

You’re not funny.

It’s hilarious!

phil m phil m 2:24 pm 01 Dec 10

I think TAMS should just get over whatever historical mumbo jumbo is being hung on to, tear it all up and resurface with that lovely hot-mix ashphalt.

Oh and the shoulders could be a lot safer too. Not as if there isn’t enough space along the verge/median strip.

It really is a substandard road by today’s standards.

D2 D2 1:59 pm 01 Dec 10

troll-sniffer said :

The strips were not expansion joints as is commonly believed. They were actually a clever device to aid the early motorist in speed monitoring, as early cars rarely had speedos and they mostly were unreliable, so the canny motorist could count the number of g-doonk-gdoonk gaps in 15 seconds, refer to the chart taped to their dashboard (where the speedo now sits) and make a crude but often accurate estimation of their speed.

😀

+1

triffid triffid 1:28 pm 01 Dec 10

It reminds me of ‘The Causeway’ in Townsville when I was a kid, so wouldn’t mind betting it is for the same reasons. The Causeway is / was, as the name implies, fairly low lying (runs next to mangroves). ‘Cos of tidal subsidence and stuff you couldn’t lay a ‘normal’ road as it would simply float up and down and crack to bits.

Answer . . . ‘the causeway’ was constructed by laying a series of ‘box culverts’ — a sort of inverted, long, flat-bottomed-U-shaped, pre-cast concrete doover — end to end (uprights of the “u” downwards into the ground) to create the road. The resulting ’causeway’ was then paved over. The ‘culverts’ would still rise and fall with seasonal tidal changes; the paving would form into ridges at the boxes junctions, and; you’d get the classic ‘g-doonk, g-doonk’ as you drove alone.

Dunno what the ground is actually like in them thar parts. I wonder if it was originally fairly ‘marshy’?

la mente torbida la mente torbida 1:10 pm 01 Dec 10

Sorry if I offended, the road is a concrete base with expansion strips…hence the g-dunk …I grew up on Canberra Ave and had the g-dunk, g-dunk send me to sleep every night

dvaey dvaey 12:15 pm 01 Dec 10

DarkLadyWolfMother said :

I always assumed it was to get people used to the sound of rails on tracks as they drove towards the train station.

I was told the same story as a child, except the other way, that after so long on a train, you didnt mind the g-doonk sound.

andym andym 12:13 pm 01 Dec 10

Solidarity said :

troll-sniffer said :

This was a little …

You’re not funny.

Cmon – that was pretty funny!

jrsubs jrsubs 12:10 pm 01 Dec 10

Jeez la mente torbida, you’re a negative piece of work. Just go and write something positive about something you ARE interested in. I’m interested to read the op and a couple of the replies. It’s true I think that this is the only old concrete road in the act, possibly because it was low-lying.

TVStar TVStar 11:59 am 01 Dec 10

Presume it’s somehow the ACT Government’s fault: bloody Stanhope.

Oh, and get a life.

Jungle Jim Jungle Jim 11:53 am 01 Dec 10

troll-sniffer said :

At each end of the section of road equipped with the g-doonk-gdoonk gaps system, there were extra wide gaps that made a g-dwonk-gthump sound, quite different to the g-doonk-gdoonk sound, and this was referred to as the point to point speed estimation system.

Ha! Thanks for a Wednesday chuckle. I tip my hat to you, sir.

Holden Caulfield Holden Caulfield 11:51 am 01 Dec 10

la mente torbida said :

FFS get a life

Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww, I think the OP just got g-doonked!

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