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Why is the Glenloch Interchange surface falling apart?

By Terra 21 May 2013 31

Seriously, it’s been what, 2 years, 3 years and already huge pot holes are appearing, long rumble lines where the bitumen is falling apart, patching needed in so many places, bouncy uneveness …

What is happening to road making in Canberra?  The Baldwin Dr/Maribynong Ave intersection cost a bomb to be made worse by the most stupidly designed traffic island in history, constant radius corners simply arent anymore, cambers rise and fall like a bank account, and a new road surface falls apart under normal use in only a couple of years!

Seriously?  What the hell is going on? 

Anyone?


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31 Responses to
Why is the Glenloch Interchange surface falling apart?
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thatsnotme 7:17 pm 20 Aug 13

Driving through Glenloch from Belconnen towards the City this morning, I noticed there was a heap of white spray paint on the road, marking the areas needing repair.

What concerned me was that there were lots of areas of crumbling surface that didn’t have the paint treatment. I’m hoping that’s because they didn’t bring enough cans of paint and after a little while they just ran out!

Would have been a whole lot easier to just draw one great big rectangle around the entire interchange to be honest…

JC 5:25 pm 20 Aug 13

JC said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

Whilst the topic of this thread is Glenloch interchange if you follow the post I was replying to you will see the discussion turned to the 80km/h section of William Hovell Drive between Coulter and Bindubi street. So nothing what so ever to do with Glenloch interchange. The speed limit through there is 90km/h, though when first built it was 80km/h but changed to 90km/h when they changed the limit on Caswell Drive and lowered the limit on the part of William Hovell discussed above.

Robertson 8:54 am 19 Aug 13

Grail said :

Apart from the pot holes on the Glenloch interchange, there are also a few places where the ground is collapsing under the road. Heading North as the road passes over the East-bound lanes of William Hovell Drive/Parkes way, the road dips.

So there are potholes hastily patched with lumps of tar, subsidence of the road base, a temporary surface for a permanent road, cracking surface that isn’t getting patched. How long until one of the bridges collapses? Anyone running a book?

Yeah, and that subsidence extends over both North and Southbound roads. I don’t drive that road frequently enough to know how quickly the subsidence is progressing, but I’d avoid driving behind any heavy vehicle in the area, that’s for sure.

Grail 5:59 am 19 Aug 13

Apart from the pot holes on the Glenloch interchange, there are also a few places where the ground is collapsing under the road. Heading North as the road passes over the East-bound lanes of William Hovell Drive/Parkes way, the road dips.

So there are potholes hastily patched with lumps of tar, subsidence of the road base, a temporary surface for a permanent road, cracking surface that isn’t getting patched. How long until one of the bridges collapses? Anyone running a book?

slashdot 7:33 pm 18 Aug 13

JC said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

That is completely stupid. They redesigned the who interchange, why didn’t they design it properly?

JC 4:05 pm 18 Aug 13

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

damien haas 10:47 am 18 Aug 13

I asked a senior roadsACT staffer why there wasn’t a strategic program and he indicated that they have to justify all road projects on an annual basis. The plans are in the bottom drawer, but long term planning is just not possible.

If there was a real strategic infrastructure body for canberra we would be a lot better off.

JC 10:06 am 18 Aug 13

Growling Ferret said :

As impressive is the reseal job at Gungahlin Drive where it intersects with Well Station Road. All looked positive – the old surface was ground down, and hot mix was laid.

From the signs I saw, its about to be redone again tonight. First go lasted less than a week before breaking up into a million pieces.

Anyone remember when the Barton highway near Gold Creek Village was resurfaced? It had exactly the same issues as mentioned above and if I recall ended up in the government taking the contractor to court to get it fixed. So see sometime, in fact I would hazard a guess most times it isn’t the governments fault but the bloody contractors.

Oddly I was driving on the Barton yesterday where it was resealed and noticed how it is breaking up again, then though about how long since it was done and worked out it was almost 20 years ago. It should have been chipsealed about 2-3 years ago to slow down the deterioration we are now seeing. Though guess that would upset Gungahlin Al.

Jethro 8:59 am 18 Aug 13

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The part of William Novell that has been reduced to 80 is by far the safest part of that road. Well lit dual carriageway with a big median island separating traffic. Then it speeds up to 90 at the actual interchange where there is traffic merging from both sides on a bend,

Deref 8:17 am 18 Aug 13

The Federal Highway leading out of Canberra is a mess. The initial chipseal failed and the road was limited to 80kph for months until it was re-surfaced. That resurfacing has also failed.

Can anyone tell us whether the contractor is going to be required to re-seal it once again at his/her own expense, or are we ratepayers going to be stung for yet another incompetent job?

CraigT 7:42 am 18 Aug 13

bundah said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

Please give the assembly a little bit of credit. If nothing else they’ve been very consistent for the past 25 years..

Well, the ginormous Art has proven reasonably reliable, so that’s obviously a massive win for the ACT Ratepayer.

bundah 7:39 pm 17 Aug 13

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

Please give the assembly a little bit of credit. If nothing else they’ve been very consistent for the past 25 years..

slashdot 7:20 pm 17 Aug 13

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

Growling Ferret 6:09 pm 17 Aug 13

As impressive is the reseal job at Gungahlin Drive where it intersects with Well Station Road. All looked positive – the old surface was ground down, and hot mix was laid.

From the signs I saw, its about to be redone again tonight. First go lasted less than a week before breaking up into a million pieces.

CraigT 5:40 pm 17 Aug 13

Whitepointer said :

Lowest tender = lowest quality of work and lowest safety.

The first contractor for this particular project is a repeat offender in Canberra with piss poor work quality who continues to go unpunished and be awarded tenders by our Government.
The amount of problems/defective works associated with the Glenloch Interchange that were identified prior to acceptance by the Government & still remain unresolved are truly disgraceful if only the general public knew!
It really is a joke. The likes of TAMS & Procurement Solutions need a massive greased up stick inserted you know where, & Chief Ministers (both past & present) don’t help the situations by directing those involved to open now & fix later. The taxpayer ends up paying for all of the dodgy work people!!!!
So keep putting your pennies away Canberra because it’s only going to get worse in if there are no repercussions for shoddy work & serious change applied to the tender award system!

…and now we have subsidence on Caswell Drive, just North of Parkes Way.

I wonder how long it will take them to decide to fix it? And how long will it be closed for to fix it?

JC 6:18 am 22 May 13

BimboGeek said :

I just think it’s wonderful how many people here are experts in road construction, materials and so on. I wouldn’t even begin to know the first thing about chip resealing, I thought roads were just asphalt or cement.

Now that I’m educated in the cheap and nasty reseal I can see how it might be useful sometimes but it explains why some roads have big problems very shortly after they are resealed. I often wondered how this was possible. If it’s a very superficial repair, of course certain types of damage won’t be easily fixed by it.

On another note, what’s with all the patches? William Hovel Drive looks like a quilt.

In the case of Glenloch the problem isn’t chip seal, whilst many don’t like seal as a road surface when done over an asphalt road it doesn’t break up like the roads around Glenloch Interchange. The problem at Glenloch is what is under the chip seal, which is a base that I have never seen produce a road surface that lasts a long time. As mentioned they basically mix cement and gravel, compact it as the road base then spray asphalt on and roll on chip seal. Then a few months later the base starts to break and you get potholes and broken road surface.

As for William Hovel are you talking about the bit between Coulter Drive and Bindubi Street? If so then quite clearly you weren’t around when it was duplicated. The patch work effect is because when they duplicated it they used parts of the old alignment (parts form bits of both east and west bound carriageways), but on the old alignment they didn’t resurface. So you have new road, old road, new road, old road etc.

LSWCHP 10:17 pm 21 May 13

I curse these mongrels every day.

The entrance ramp as you head on to the GDE from the south has a pothole that is more like a pot-trench. I swear it must be 10m long, and the problem is that it’s hard to avoid because you have to take it at speed as you accelerate to merge with the traffic coming from Woden.

Someone is grinning and raking in the cash from us chumps as they bid for their next cockup.

BimboGeek 10:14 pm 21 May 13

I just think it’s wonderful how many people here are experts in road construction, materials and so on. I wouldn’t even begin to know the first thing about chip resealing, I thought roads were just asphalt or cement.

Now that I’m educated in the cheap and nasty reseal I can see how it might be useful sometimes but it explains why some roads have big problems very shortly after they are resealed. I often wondered how this was possible. If it’s a very superficial repair, of course certain types of damage won’t be easily fixed by it.

On another note, what’s with all the patches? William Hovel Drive looks like a quilt.

slashdot 9:07 pm 21 May 13

Whitepointer said :

Lowest tender = lowest quality of work and lowest safety.

The likes of TAMS & Procurement Solutions need a massive greased up stick inserted you know where, & Chief Ministers (both past & present) don’t help the situations by directing those involved to open now & fix later. The taxpayer ends up paying for all of the dodgy work people!!!!
So keep putting your pennies away Canberra because it’s only going to get worse in if there are no repercussions for shoddy work & serious change applied to the tender award system!

The stick shouldn’t be greased.

thatsnotme 7:02 pm 21 May 13

JC said :

Related I noticed this afternoon that the new west bound lanes on Parkes way is now in use (with the outside closed to remark the lines), and it appears as if the older lanes on this road won’t be resurfaced, which is another pet hate of mine. I can handle different road surfaces, but not across the road like this. What surprised me though is where the new lane meets the deviation to Belconnen they have made no attempt to straighten out the little kink (bearning in mind Parkes Way used to go towards the south will Belconnen as an exit) and at this point the road surface is shocking. Would have liked to have seen the whole of Parkes way upto and under Glenloch resurfaced. But not to be.

Couldn’t agree more. That little kink is terrible, not least because even now, the old line markings are still visible. At certain times if it’s wet, or if the sun is shining at the right angle, it can be really hard to see which are the right lane markings. Not so bad if you drive the road often, but if you’re not familiar with it it’d come as a rude shock.

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