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Why is the Glenloch Interchange surface falling apart?

By Terra - 21 May 2013 31

Seriously, it’s been what, 2 years, 3 years and already huge pot holes are appearing, long rumble lines where the bitumen is falling apart, patching needed in so many places, bouncy uneveness …

What is happening to road making in Canberra?  The Baldwin Dr/Maribynong Ave intersection cost a bomb to be made worse by the most stupidly designed traffic island in history, constant radius corners simply arent anymore, cambers rise and fall like a bank account, and a new road surface falls apart under normal use in only a couple of years!

Seriously?  What the hell is going on? 

Anyone?

What’s Your opinion?


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31 Responses to
Why is the Glenloch Interchange surface falling apart?
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thatsnotme 7:17 pm 20 Aug 13

Driving through Glenloch from Belconnen towards the City this morning, I noticed there was a heap of white spray paint on the road, marking the areas needing repair.

What concerned me was that there were lots of areas of crumbling surface that didn’t have the paint treatment. I’m hoping that’s because they didn’t bring enough cans of paint and after a little while they just ran out!

Would have been a whole lot easier to just draw one great big rectangle around the entire interchange to be honest…

JC 5:25 pm 20 Aug 13

JC said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

Whilst the topic of this thread is Glenloch interchange if you follow the post I was replying to you will see the discussion turned to the 80km/h section of William Hovell Drive between Coulter and Bindubi street. So nothing what so ever to do with Glenloch interchange. The speed limit through there is 90km/h, though when first built it was 80km/h but changed to 90km/h when they changed the limit on Caswell Drive and lowered the limit on the part of William Hovell discussed above.

Robertson 8:54 am 19 Aug 13

Grail said :

Apart from the pot holes on the Glenloch interchange, there are also a few places where the ground is collapsing under the road. Heading North as the road passes over the East-bound lanes of William Hovell Drive/Parkes way, the road dips.

So there are potholes hastily patched with lumps of tar, subsidence of the road base, a temporary surface for a permanent road, cracking surface that isn’t getting patched. How long until one of the bridges collapses? Anyone running a book?

Yeah, and that subsidence extends over both North and Southbound roads. I don’t drive that road frequently enough to know how quickly the subsidence is progressing, but I’d avoid driving behind any heavy vehicle in the area, that’s for sure.

Grail 5:59 am 19 Aug 13

Apart from the pot holes on the Glenloch interchange, there are also a few places where the ground is collapsing under the road. Heading North as the road passes over the East-bound lanes of William Hovell Drive/Parkes way, the road dips.

So there are potholes hastily patched with lumps of tar, subsidence of the road base, a temporary surface for a permanent road, cracking surface that isn’t getting patched. How long until one of the bridges collapses? Anyone running a book?

slashdot 7:33 pm 18 Aug 13

JC said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

That is completely stupid. They redesigned the who interchange, why didn’t they design it properly?

JC 4:05 pm 18 Aug 13

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The speed limit was lowered on the relatively straight stretch between Coulter Drive and Bindubi for no reason other than to comply with Australian standards. Apparently 80km/h is the fastest that the standards allow a road to be speed limited at through a set of traffic lights.

Rather than making it 90-80-90-80-90 (with 80 through the lights) they decided to make it 80km/h from just before the first set of lights, between the lights until just after, hence the 90-80-90 change.

Apparently the 80 stretch is long enough so as to comply with another standard for the number of speed limit changes over a given stretch of road.

damien haas 10:47 am 18 Aug 13

I asked a senior roadsACT staffer why there wasn’t a strategic program and he indicated that they have to justify all road projects on an annual basis. The plans are in the bottom drawer, but long term planning is just not possible.

If there was a real strategic infrastructure body for canberra we would be a lot better off.

JC 10:06 am 18 Aug 13

Growling Ferret said :

As impressive is the reseal job at Gungahlin Drive where it intersects with Well Station Road. All looked positive – the old surface was ground down, and hot mix was laid.

From the signs I saw, its about to be redone again tonight. First go lasted less than a week before breaking up into a million pieces.

Anyone remember when the Barton highway near Gold Creek Village was resurfaced? It had exactly the same issues as mentioned above and if I recall ended up in the government taking the contractor to court to get it fixed. So see sometime, in fact I would hazard a guess most times it isn’t the governments fault but the bloody contractors.

Oddly I was driving on the Barton yesterday where it was resealed and noticed how it is breaking up again, then though about how long since it was done and worked out it was almost 20 years ago. It should have been chipsealed about 2-3 years ago to slow down the deterioration we are now seeing. Though guess that would upset Gungahlin Al.

Jethro 8:59 am 18 Aug 13

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

The part of William Novell that has been reduced to 80 is by far the safest part of that road. Well lit dual carriageway with a big median island separating traffic. Then it speeds up to 90 at the actual interchange where there is traffic merging from both sides on a bend,

Deref 8:17 am 18 Aug 13

The Federal Highway leading out of Canberra is a mess. The initial chipseal failed and the road was limited to 80kph for months until it was re-surfaced. That resurfacing has also failed.

Can anyone tell us whether the contractor is going to be required to re-seal it once again at his/her own expense, or are we ratepayers going to be stung for yet another incompetent job?

CraigT 7:42 am 18 Aug 13

bundah said :

slashdot said :

Because this government is incompetent?

Why did they design the road so that it goes 90-80-90? Although they lowered the speed limit of William Hovel to 80 because everyone always sped on William Hovel and that caused accidents.

Who thought that was smart?

Please give the assembly a little bit of credit. If nothing else they’ve been very consistent for the past 25 years..

Well, the ginormous Art has proven reasonably reliable, so that’s obviously a massive win for the ACT Ratepayer.

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