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The Marist riot

By 1 December 2013 137

ACT Policing were required to respond to numerous incidents of disorderly behaviour and traffic hazards by graduating students from Marist College in Civic early this morning (Sunday, 1 December).

Around 2am police received reports of over 120 students congregated in the Pitts car park, Civic prior to commencing a walk southbound along the Commonwealth Avenue finishing in Pearce.

Police received several calls from members of the public reporting that the crowd was disrupting traffic flow in the vicinity of Capital Circle by walking and running onto the roadway to stop traffic – endangering not only themselves but others.

Ten general duties patrols attended and escorted the group but were forced on several occasions to block traffic along Adelaide Avenue and Melrose Drive to ensure the safety of individuals marching, many of whom were intoxicated and displaying aggressive behaviour.

Police vehicles were intermittingly hit with rocks and police officers abused by members of the crowd.

Upon arrival at Marist College students were asked to move on and the crowd dispersed within 15 minutes.

During the walk three males were arrested for breach of the peace and released soon after.

Acting Superintendent Jo Cameron said the prime objective of police during the walk was to keep the crowd moving towards Marist College whilst minimising disruption to traffic and preventing injury to pedestrians.

“As we pointed out in our recent stand up on school formals police are not against students having a good time but if things get out of hand action will be taken,” Acting Superintendent Cameron said.

“We encourage everyone to go out and have a good time but police along with the community will in no way tolerate anti-social behaviour that could put themselves and other lives at risk.”

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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137 Responses to The Marist riot
#1
Skidbladnir9:31 pm, 01 Dec 13

Disappointing.

No damage to buildings, no stolen public signage, people arrested without use of pepper spray and nobody charged, no incidents with Parliament House or Embassies, and being willingly dispersed in fifteen minutes without a barbeque?
Very disappointing indeed, boys. And poor form on the rock throwing at police.

(Things have really settled since my walkback…)

#2
MrPC9:46 pm, 01 Dec 13

I’d abuse you too if you used the word intermittingly in a sentence.

#3
Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd10:04 pm, 01 Dec 13

Retards.

Also, I’m sure the levels of non protected boy on boy bumming was massive that night.

#4
Mr Evil10:10 pm, 01 Dec 13

See, a Catholic education is a good education…………

#5
IrishPete11:01 pm, 01 Dec 13

MrPC said :

I’d abuse you too if you used the word intermittingly in a sentence.

For some reason the scene from Life Of Brian, where the Roman officer corrects Brian’s graffiti, comes to mind…

IP

#6
Roundhead897:07 am, 02 Dec 13

The Marist kids keeping up the school’s fine traditions. Brother Koska and Paul Lyons are looking down from above smiling.

#7
ScienceRules8:03 am, 02 Dec 13

You just can’t beat a classical, private education. Can you?

#8
Robertson8:16 am, 02 Dec 13

The take-home message I get from this is that you can throw rocks at police cars and the police won’t charge you with anything.

Limp.

#9
Tooks8:56 am, 02 Dec 13

Robertson said :

The take-home message I get from this is that you can throw rocks at police cars and the police won’t charge you with anything.

Limp.

Cool, you try it next time you see a cop car and see how you go.

Or you could use that dormant organ sitting in your headbone and realise someone throwing rocks from within a large group probably couldn’t be identified as the thrower. Maybe cops could forget about common proofs and just charge whoever, right?

#10
johnboy9:10 am, 02 Dec 13

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

#11
Baggy9:15 am, 02 Dec 13

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

Retards.

Also, I’m sure the levels of non protected boy on boy bumming was massive that night.

Do I detect a healthy dose of homophobia there?

How about an enormous case of generalisation?

Roundhead89 said :

The Marist kids keeping up the school’s fine traditions. Brother Koska and Paul Lyons are looking down from above smiling.

What do those two scumbags have to do with a mob of kids going off the rails today?

#12
Baggy9:16 am, 02 Dec 13

johnboy said :

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

I’m sorry, arresting them for what? Are you then in favour of arresting, for example, protestors at various anti-capitalist/globalisation riots? Guilt by association, yeah?

#13
Skidbladnir9:21 am, 02 Dec 13

johnboy said :

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

The “I am Spartacus” solution?

#14
Postalgeek9:23 am, 02 Dec 13

Riot gear, batons, rubber bullets, tear gas. Now that would be an education.

#15
IrishPete9:39 am, 02 Dec 13

Roundhead89 said :

The Marist kids keeping up the school’s fine traditions. Brother Koska and Paul Lyons are looking down from above smiling.

I don’t think Kotska is dead.

IP

#16
Rollersk8r10:34 am, 02 Dec 13

Skidbladnir said :

Disappointing.

No damage to buildings, no stolen public signage, people arrested without use of pepper spray and nobody charged, no incidents with Parliament House or Embassies, and being willingly dispersed in fifteen minutes without a barbeque?
Very disappointing indeed, boys. And poor form on the rock throwing at police.

(Things have really settled since my walkback…)

Obviously they walked back to the school – but I’ve never heard of a walkback. Is this a thing? What’s the point? After a very long walk you get to the school, and?

#17
markbuzz11:29 am, 02 Dec 13

Rollersk8r said :

Obviously they walked back to the school – but I’ve never heard of a walkback. Is this a thing? What’s the point? After a very long walk you get to the school, and?

It is a tradition they have.

School has issued a statement with apology. Snipped:

markbuzz said :


The so called ‘walk back’ is not a College event; it has never been supported by the College and is in fact strongly discouraged by the College. It is unsafe and dangerous. It is an inappropriate means of showing school pride. There is nothing to be proud of in anti-social behaviour.

The College position is that there be no ‘walk back’ and this position is explained in writing to parents and boys before Graduation.

On behalf of the College I want to apologize to both the police who had to deal with these boys and to the people of the community who were affected by their anti-social behaviour. I appreciate the efforts by the police on Saturday night and regret that they were confronted with this situation.

#18
johnboy11:31 am, 02 Dec 13

Maybe they could make the statement on their website so everyone is on the same page?

http://www.maristc.act.edu.au/

#19
markbuzz12:00 pm, 02 Dec 13

johnboy said :

Maybe they could make the statement on their website so everyone is on the same page?

Would make sense. And get it up onto social media while topic is still warm. They issued it to the journalist who wrote the article and emailed it out to the general parents mailing list (I am one, and an old boy – though I pre-date this ‘tradition’.)

#20
Russ12:22 pm, 02 Dec 13

Russ said :

On behalf of the College I want to apologize to both the police

I hope they also apologise for using (and teaching, I assume) American spelling.

#21
HiddenDragon12:43 pm, 02 Dec 13

I wonder if there is a future PM in this crop?

#22
Woody Mann-Caruso1:03 pm, 02 Dec 13

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

Tricky. Our affray legislation (which is only a few years old) sets a high bar for proving an offence. It’s not enough to be hanging out with violent individuals committing violence.

(In colonial jurisdictions one could face a crowd, declare that they singly and severally constituted an affray, order them to disperse, fire a warning shot over their heads, then just start arresting / shooting the natives. Ah, good times *twirls moustache, drinks gin*.)

#23
Blen_Carmichael2:03 pm, 02 Dec 13

A case of boys drinking men’s beer from the sounds of it. Throwing rocks at outnumbered police, harrassing and intimidating pedestrians – I hope you’re truly proud of yourselves, kiddies.

#24
dph2:38 pm, 02 Dec 13

Highly intoxicated kids, walking along busy roads in the middle of the night…. what could possibly go wrong?

#25
Robertson3:19 pm, 02 Dec 13

Baggy said :

johnboy said :

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

I’m sorry, arresting them for what? Are you then in favour of arresting, for example, protestors at various anti-capitalist/globalisation riots? Guilt by association, yeah?

Jay-walking? Riotous assembly? Offensive behaviour? Drunk and disorderly?

But no, cops didn’t even try, and these idiots now know that obeying the law is optional.

As for who threw the rocks – that’s criminal damage. Arrest the lot of them, fingerprint them, lift prints off the rocks, scare them into an admission or browbeat their peers into giving them up.

But no, cops didn’t even try, and these idiots are encouraged to thumb their noses at the law.

Limp, limp, limp. What are my taxes for?

#26
Robertson3:36 pm, 02 Dec 13

Baggy said :

johnboy said :

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

I’m sorry, arresting them for what? Are you then in favour of arresting, for example, protestors at various anti-capitalist/globalisation riots? Guilt by association, yeah?

Well, if you cast your mind back to the “AIDEX” arms fair held in Canberra back in 1991,
(http://dtl.unimelb.edu.au/R/QFPAX2LFKE2J9CYA9RFQAJMCHLPLM4YANVBYC8QILC3I2MNIL1-00128?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=273351&local_base=GEN01&pds_handle=GUEST)
you will recall that a group of Quakers and catholic nuns tried to picket the entrance to the venue, handing out anti-war pacifist literature. You may also recall that the cops turned up and beat the crap out of them.

So, cops not scared of nuns, then.
However, cops clearly scared of 18-year-old drunk boys.

#27
c_c™4:37 pm, 02 Dec 13

So continues the great hypocrisy in religious (and particularly Catholic) education. Portrayed as building character, it is in reality just a lesson in how to carry yourself as if riotous and virtuous while being able to do what every you want so long as you juggle some beads afterwards.

#28
MOCS5:08 pm, 02 Dec 13

Robertson said :

Baggy said :

johnboy said :

arresting the whole damn lot of them would one supposes be too much to ask for.

I’m sorry, arresting them for what? Are you then in favour of arresting, for example, protestors at various anti-capitalist/globalisation riots? Guilt by association, yeah?

However, cops clearly scared of 18-year-old drunk boys.

LOL… Love the armchair critics, the hindsight experts and my favourite, the “If I was there I would have…” ‘s. Unfortunately, real life isn’t quite like the movies and actual real life trained professionals have to make actual real life on-the-spot decisions based on their real life experience and training while actually being there. It must be great to then have these decisions publicaly critisied by numb nuts who in reality don’t actually have a real clue.

#29
Skidbladnir5:23 pm, 02 Dec 13

c_c™ said :

So continues the great hypocrisy in religious (and particularly Catholic) education. Portrayed as buconditionilding character, it is in reality just a lesson in how to carry yourself as if riotous and virtuous e being able to do what every you want so long as you juggle some beads afterwards.

You and I have different expectations of hypocrisy and hypocrites, and I think you’re profoundly overestimating the effect of religion in education.
Hypocrisy is not the mother of all sins, and nor are hypocrites constantly professing virtue and restraint whilst wilfully planning deception.

Personally, it’s not the constant adherence to a moral code that makes life lessons (as this becomes for everybody who received a concerned warning, and either obeyed or refuted it’s intent) worth learning.
Really, the difficulties involved – in developing, adhering to, and redefining that code as a result of missteps made along the way – are what make it interesting.
The struggle, between base impulses, the rigorous demands of a moral system, and dealing with the consequences of either living out or redefining that code that is the human condition.
For mine, it is how these boys (despite the fact they and the law may consider them men) conduct themselves in that struggle and deal with the consequences of their actions that determines how we ought to judge them as individuals, not a single instance of poor behaviour from certain members of a group becoming the defining standard by which we judge all of them.

#30
IrishPete6:27 pm, 02 Dec 13

c_c™ said :

So continues the great hypocrisy in religious (and particularly Catholic) education. Portrayed as building character, it is in reality just a lesson in how to carry yourself as if riotous and virtuous while being able to do what every you want so long as you juggle some beads afterwards.

I think you meant righteous. Riotous they certainly were.

IP

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