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31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags

By johnboy 28 October 2010 105

[First filed: Oct 27, 2010 @ 10:31]

plastic bags

Simon Corbell has announced the end of light plastic shopping bags with the final ban to be in place from 1 November next year.

Before panicking bear in mind there will be many exemptions:

The Plastic Shopping Bags Ban Bill 2010 will ban the supply of plastic shopping bags of 35 microns or less, generally the type distributed through supermarkets, grocery stores and takeaway food outlets.

A range of bags will be unaffected by the ban, including barrier bags of the type dispensed from a roll to hold items such as fruit or meat and heavier retail bags used in department, footwear and clothing stores.

The Government expects that retailers will provide a range of bags to consumers to replace light weight plastic bags including reuseable ‘green’ bags, paper bags and biodegradable bags which meet Australian Standard AS 4736-2006. The sale of plastic bin liners for waste containers in the home is unaffected by the ban.

I’m still not sure how we’re getting greasy take-away home without making a mess in the car, but we’re going to find out.

UPDATE: The Greens’ Caroline Le Couteur has expressed her pleasure at this piece of Green policy being adopted.

What’s Your opinion?


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31 October 2011 the last day for light plastic shopping bags
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Holditz 12:13 pm 11 Nov 10

Jim Jones said :

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

How is Nazis riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood a human right abuse? Personally I reckon that would be worth a looksee.

Jim Jones said :

Disabled people can use cloth bags or whatever else type of bag they might own: they’re disabled, not stupid.

It’s easier to carry things with prams (most have ample cargo space).

The elderly are usually much better at planning ahead for shopping trips than their younger cohorts.

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

+1

Jim Jones 11:37 am 11 Nov 10

Disabled people can use cloth bags or whatever else type of bag they might own: they’re disabled, not stupid.

It’s easier to carry things with prams (most have ample cargo space).

The elderly are usually much better at planning ahead for shopping trips than their younger cohorts.

Honestly, it’s just getting rid of plastic bags, it’s not some sort of human rights abuse. The sky isn’t going to fall and Nazis won’t be riding dinosaurs through rivers of blood.

dvaey 11:10 am 11 Nov 10

Seems Im a bit late to the party, but how will this work for the disabled? Sure, an able-bodied person might be able to easily carry a box or paper bag of their goodies, but what happens for the little old lady on a walking-frame, who needs to buy a couple of items? Does she have to use a box? Does she have to pay 10c, because she is physically unable to carry the items without the assistance of a bag? Is she required to carry her own bags with her, just in-case she decides to make a purchase?

What about people on bicycles? Are you likely to be able to carry a cardboard box on your handlebars? What about parents with prams? Its much easier to hang a plastic bag off the pram handle than balance a box above your baby’s head.

bethybobs 10:50 pm 03 Nov 10

CraigT said :

Real change will have occurred when people are eating seasonal local produce instead of produce that’s been trucked back and forth across the country for weeks.

The government will need to do this by:
– increasing taxes on freight so the rest of us stop subsidising road maintenance for the benefit of trucks
– increasing the availability of land for growing food on – release land for market-gardens and put an end to postage-stamp-sized blocks with over-sized houses on them
– increased funding for education to teach children and adults the basics of horticulture and agriculture

I was surprised by how many people posting say they buy their veges and fruit from the supermarket. I am not even sure its real food sometimes.

6

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