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And the Mully Cup for July 2012 goes to; The Concerned Citizens of Canberra

johnboy 1 August 2012 76

mully cup

Readers will doubtless be thrilled to learn that Canberra’s answer to the Ku Klux Klan, the Concerned Citizens of Canberra for their vile bit of dog whistling in Gungahlin against the long planned mosque.

It’s true the story kicked off on 28 June but the comments waged long and loud as bigots crawled out of the woodwork to show their sickening true colours.

Ending up with 246 comments and spawning a couple of extra stories it was a worthy Mully Cup winner for July 2012.

(The Mully Cup is awarded monthly to the entity stimulating the most comment on this website. It is named in memory (if not in honour) of Justin Mully Williams who both improved our world, and set the record for comments, in his departure)


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And the Mully Cup for July 2012 goes to; The Concerned Citizens of Canberra
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poetix 1:59 pm 04 Aug 12

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietrich_Bonhoeffer

This is an article about a German theologian who was adamantly opposed to the Nazis and executed by the Gestapo. He has a statue inside Westminster Abbey, alongside Martin Luther King.

Jethro 12:01 pm 04 Aug 12

HenryBG said :

johnboy said :

I you want to see sectarian violence try asking all of Canberra’s Christians to share the same facility.

Doesn’t happen. Because Christians were dragged out of the dark ages by a couple of centuries of warfare followed by the scientific revolution. Islam still has all that to go through. And I for one don’t believe we should allow them to go through any of it here.

HenryBG said :

The biggest Protestant group in 1930s Germany (Deutsche Christen) was a group whose aim was to combine Nazism with Christianity to create a new Nationalist Christian cult. They picked through their religion to get rid of anything that seemed too “foreign” or “jewish”.

The Nazis themselves regarded themselves as militant Christians, although there was a lot of revived weirdo Teutonic pagan nonsense going on as well.

There was nothing godless about them – that’s just the propaganda put about since the end of the 1,000-year Reich by the rest of the world’s Christian god-botherers, embarrassed as they are that the world’s 2nd-worst regime of mass-murderers was adamantly inspired by the Christian religion.

Are you arguing against yourself now HenryBG?

I suggest a cup of tea, a Bex and a good lie down.

Masquara 11:28 am 04 Aug 12

HenryBG said :

The biggest Protestant group in 1930s Germany (Deutsche Christen) was a group whose aim was to combine Nazism with Christianity to create a new Nationalist Christian cult… … … … regime of mass-murderers was adamantly inspired by the Christian religion.

HenryBG, given that it’s clear from your earlier post that you don’t know basic history such as the contribution Islam had made to the world’s knowledge by the turn of the 11th century, it looks as though you must have got your grasp of this from a quick google/wikipedia search!

HenryBG 8:59 am 04 Aug 12

johnboy said :

It should be noted that the big german theologians went to the mat and paid with their lives in opposing nazism which was essentially godless.
.

Who fed you that, JB?

The biggest Protestant group in 1930s Germany (Deutsche Christen) was a group whose aim was to combine Nazism with Christianity to create a new Nationalist Christian cult. They picked through their religion to get rid of anything that seemed too “foreign” or “jewish”.

The Nazis themselves regarded themselves as militant Christians, although there was a lot of revived weirdo Teutonic pagan nonsense going on as well.

There was nothing godless about them – that’s just the propaganda put about since the end of the 1,000-year Reich by the rest of the world’s Christian god-botherers, embarrassed as they are that the world’s 2nd-worst regime of mass-murderers was adamantly inspired by the Christian religion.

DrKoresh 12:37 am 04 Aug 12

AAMC said :

Hey JB, I note the inaugural Mully Trophy is quickly running out of space to record it illustrious recipients names and contributions.

Are there any plans to produce a new symbol of Riot act hysteria; a Mully mark 2″

Can I suggest that, if the Mully is to be replaced, the RA:

1. Produce a commemorative 1/16th scale “mully” for purchase.
2. Give it an appropriate send off, maybe a parade up northbound (We could get Lorie daily to drop it off the back of a mini moke)

Can we not just make it bigger? Stick another hubcap and layer of cans on. I’m happy to provide empty woodstocks if someone else supplies the cap.

johnboy 12:05 am 04 Aug 12

It should be noted that the big german theologians went to the mat and paid with their lives in opposing nazism which was essentially godless.

And Godwin.

Stevian 11:10 pm 03 Aug 12

Pork Hunt said :

What religion did the Nazis observe?

The NSDAP was a political rather than a religious movement, most members of the party and those under its governance would have probably claim adherence to some branch of mainstream Christianity.
Your point is ….?

Pork Hunt 6:02 pm 03 Aug 12

What religion did the Nazis observe?

Jethro 5:00 pm 03 Aug 12

p1 said :

LSWCHP said :

Ok, But Iceland? Of all the fantastic travel destinations available in the world, why Iceland?

Iceland has always been pretty high on my list of places to visit. Considerably higher on the list then Japan, all other things being equal.

For the record, I have no Icelandic friends, but I have a friend who was arrested there once.

I visited for a month about 15 years ago.

It is absolutely fantastic. I’m pretty well travelled and I would say that Iceland tops the list of places I’ve visited.

4W-Driving on Vatnajokull Glacier is pretty hard to beat, as are the Northern lights, and the absolutely mad Icelandic people. If you want a good drinking buddy find an Icelander.

It’s not all that far off the beaten track – a quick flight from Heathrow, and now that their economy has tanked I would guess it’s a fair bit cheaper than it was in the past.

Highly recommended.

poetix 2:59 pm 03 Aug 12

johnboy said :

Believe it or not I have strayed beyond the ACT border from time to time. Why just last weekend I was in Japan.

And haven’t given a wardrobe acquisition update. Ms Manners is appalled, after all those nice people helped.

p1 2:48 pm 03 Aug 12

LSWCHP said :

Ok, But Iceland? Of all the fantastic travel destinations available in the world, why Iceland?

Iceland has always been pretty high on my list of places to visit. Considerably higher on the list then Japan, all other things being equal.

For the record, I have no Icelandic friends, but I have a friend who was arrested there once.

LSWCHP 2:30 pm 03 Aug 12

johnboy said :

Believe it or not I have strayed beyond the ACT border from time to time. Why just last weekend I was in Japan.

Ok, But Iceland? Of all the fantastic travel destinations available in the world, why Iceland?

Now Japan, I can understand that. I spent a week there (mostly on a warship in Yokosuka harbour unfortunately) in 1997, and one day I intend to go back there. It’s a fantastic place.

LSWCHP 2:23 pm 03 Aug 12

Thumper said :

Since that tragic day Herne’s ghost is said to haunt the forest as a bizarre and terrifying sight. He is said to wear a deerskin robe with a strange helmet made from a stag’s skull complete with branching antlers. He is often reported as having an owl flying above him and sometimes can be seen riding a black horse with blazing red eyes while leading a pack of demon dogs.

🙂

Sounds like my boss.

LSWCHP 2:20 pm 03 Aug 12

johnboy said :

My icelandic friends tell me worshiping thor involves a lot of eating pork and hitting each other while drinking beer if that helps.

Icelandic friends? Seriously? Is there actually an Icelandic community (ie more than 2 people) in Canberra?

    johnboy 2:20 pm 03 Aug 12

    Believe it or not I have strayed beyond the ACT border from time to time. Why just last weekend I was in Japan.

p1 2:14 pm 03 Aug 12

AAMC said :

1. Produce a commemorative 1/16th scale “mully” for purchase.
2. Give it an appropriate send off, maybe a parade up northbound (We could get Lorie daily to drop it off the back of a mini moke)

I like (1) – I would buy one if I won it. And I like (2), if we can do it during summergnats, and only if it travels in the back of a white commodore.

If (as someone suggested in the past) another tier is added, I would like to suggest that a large chrome hub-cap is used, as that is what the better class of bogans have on their cars

qbngeek 2:10 pm 03 Aug 12

Jim Jones said :

Baldy said :

devils_advocate said :

Jim Jones said :

The Satanic Bible by La Vey is an interesting read (and good to have on the bookshelf to annoy fundies), but it’s not much more than (very American) libertarian political theory with a hedonistic foundation (written by a carny no less). It’s not got any religious content per se.

I don’t think it has any content full stop. It talks about selfism, and tbh it appears there is no shortage of that. As a book, it promises little and delivers less.

Ah. So basically it’s about Gen Y then 😀

I should clarify that It’s not religion per se that i am interested in, just the cultural aspects of relgion and the way people live their lives around their beliefs, which a quick read on Wikipedia says this falls into.

Are then any Satanist that also actually worship satan text out there as well?

‘Satanists’ that actually worship Satan are usually disgruntled Catholics railing against unpleasant upbringings. Satan is a character in Christian mythology after all.

There was a loose-knit ‘satanic’ movement of opposition to Christianity around Scandinavian regions, but they fairly quickly abandoned the whole satanist schtick (after burning down a few old churches mind you) and stated paying homage to the ‘ancient religions’ that predated Christianity instead (Christianity being largely responsible for preventing worship of Odin, Thor, and all that lot). The book Lords of Chaos covers a bit of it (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lords_of_Chaos_%28book%29)

The satanic statements sum up and represent how myself and most satanists I know view Satan. It is a representation rather than an all powerful god-like figure. Besides, belief in invisible beings that you talk to and that control your life is nothing more than insanity.

Thumper 2:08 pm 03 Aug 12

Baldy said :

Thumper said :

It would seem that to believe in Satan then one must believe in the christian god given that Satan, the devil, was a christian construct of the middle ages.

Also interestingly it seems possible that that Herne the Hunter could represent the Norse god Odin who was known to the Anglo-Saxons as Woden, Lord of the Wild Hunt.

Incidentally, the Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe which tells of a ghostly group of huntsmen with the all accoutrements of hunting such as horses, bugles and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or just above it. The hunters may be the dead or fairies or even unidentified lost souls, deities, spirits, historical figures or mythical figures such as Woden.

Which has got absolutely nothing to do with mosques 🙂

Good point with the Satan worship but is it possible that Satan was just another god that got absorbed and demonisd into Christianity. They certainly did a lot of that when taking over new land.

Possibly, but I’ve yet to find any evidence of it, having said that, the Horned God of pagan beliefs (which again could be Herne, the Green man, Jack in the Green, or many other derivatives) was later used by the church as the image of Satan.

Interestingly numerous christian churches have Green Man images carved onto them, this is believed to be somewhat of a homage to the old Gods and incredibly these images can even be found on churches in Australia.

AAMC 1:45 pm 03 Aug 12

Hey JB, I note the inaugural Mully Trophy is quickly running out of space to record it illustrious recipients names and contributions.

Are there any plans to produce a new symbol of Riot act hysteria; a Mully mark 2″

Can I suggest that, if the Mully is to be replaced, the RA:

1. Produce a commemorative 1/16th scale “mully” for purchase.
2. Give it an appropriate send off, maybe a parade up northbound (We could get Lorie daily to drop it off the back of a mini moke)

Jim Jones 1:44 pm 03 Aug 12

poetix said :

Thumper said :

It would seem that to believe in Satan then one must believe in the christian god given that Satan, the devil, was a christian construct of the middle ages.

Also interestingly it seems possible that that Herne the Hunter could represent the Norse god Odin who was known to the Anglo-Saxons as Woden, Lord of the Wild Hunt.

Incidentally, the Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe which tells of a ghostly group of huntsmen with the all accoutrements of hunting such as horses, bugles and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or just above it. The hunters may be the dead or fairies or even unidentified lost souls, deities, spirits, historical figures or mythical figures such as Woden.

That sounds pretty much like the Woden bus interchange, with the lost souls and all.

Incidentally, Islam has Shaitan too.

Shaitan is a different kind of beast to the Christian Satan, and is more derived from the Old Testament satan, who is ‘the adversary’ – an accuser appointed by God to test men’s faith (kind of like a devil’s advocate), rather than an enemy of God. The whole ‘battle of light and dark’ thing owes a lot to Manicheanism and religious paranoia.

Unsurprisingly, a lot of the Norse revivalists have unsavoury links with the far right.

Baldy 1:30 pm 03 Aug 12

Thumper said :

It would seem that to believe in Satan then one must believe in the christian god given that Satan, the devil, was a christian construct of the middle ages.

Also interestingly it seems possible that that Herne the Hunter could represent the Norse god Odin who was known to the Anglo-Saxons as Woden, Lord of the Wild Hunt.

Incidentally, the Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe which tells of a ghostly group of huntsmen with the all accoutrements of hunting such as horses, bugles and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or just above it. The hunters may be the dead or fairies or even unidentified lost souls, deities, spirits, historical figures or mythical figures such as Woden.

Which has got absolutely nothing to do with mosques 🙂

Good point with the Satan worship but is it possible that Satan was just another god that got absorbed and demonisd into Christianity. They certainly did a lot of that when taking over new land.

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