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Bicycle restoration in Canberra?

By mp2615 - 6 February 2012 14

Ok, popcorn ? check. Fizzy drink ? check.

I’m seeking some assistance from the RA collective to do with bicycle restoration.

I’ve decided to give my old roadie a big dose of bike love.

I recall a thread about respray recommendations. 

Any + suggestions would be great. 

I also need to have some shiny bits rechromed (no, not my head).  I thought the guys in Kembla st would be good for that.

Now, can someone please explain in short words what converts a friction gear shift to an indexed system ? The original format is friction shifters on the downtube. I’m undecided about keeping gears and brakes separate or go the rat and fit a fancy integrated setup.  Everything else is just money I think – new seat, wheels, group set. 

Thanks

What’s Your opinion?


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14 Responses to
Bicycle restoration in Canberra?
nothingtoprove 6:10 pm 07 Feb 12
patrick_keogh 5:33 pm 07 Feb 12

Ray-Ray said :

If I got my bike frame sandblasted, would car painters paint a bike frame? and if so, about how much would it cost to be painted?

Let me recommend powder coating as a durable finish that is now available in a fair range of colours. There are two or three places around Fyshwick/Queanbeyan who can do it.

It should probably be said though that unless this bike has significant sentimental value then you are probably throwing good money after bad in reconditioning it. By the time you buy tyres, tubes, sandblasting, painting, new cables, new brake pads, brake hoods etc. etc. you could buy a modern bike which will be lighter, stiffer, change gears better and be more reliable.

I have kept and restored my oldest road bike but it isn’t remotely as good to ride as my modern road bike or touring bike or dualie… gears in particular have come a long way in 30 years.

Ray-Ray 9:10 am 07 Feb 12

If I got my bike frame sandblasted, would car painters paint a bike frame? and if so, about how much would it cost to be painted?

Brandi 10:32 pm 06 Feb 12

Your bike is more modern than I expected! A 7 speed probably has 700c wheels already, so 105 brakes (grey series with green and blue label?) are likely to be fine. Sounds like you’re after a straight-up resto… Check how much meat is left in the rims, there should be a wear indicator. If they’re ok get the hubs and freehub body serviced – new bearings and grease may be all that’s needed, provided the cones are not worn. Service the headset while it’s all disassembled, check the crown race for wear and make sure the cups are pressed in correctly after the paint job. Replace the bottom bracket with a sealed-bearing Shimano UN54 of the correct axle width. Look for replacements NOS chainrings and cassette, they are likely to be worn.

I like the suggestion about RSX shift levers, but also recall an expert opinion about the fragility of early examples. There may be a reason they’re going cheap on the Bay.

With the paint, if you’re leaving chrome on the chain/seatstays you may want some decals to cover the transition. AA Sandblasting – I’m not sure if anyone else in the area even does this work? – and I’ve had better results from Tai’s in Queanbeyan than Canfab, but that’s my own take on it.

patrick_keogh 9:04 pm 06 Feb 12

A bit of diligence on ebay will find you compatible bits for most of the drivetrain. One thing to ponder though is what to do about wheels. Almost all bikes of that style from the ’80s will be 27″, whereas today it will be the very similar 700C size. Tubes are not a problem, but your choice in rims and tyres will be a lot more limited. Of course you could put 700C wheels on your bike but then you may run into problems with brake reach. If it is primarily a nostalgia thing then stay with 27″ but if you plan to ride it a fair bit then you might consider biting the bullet and moving to 700C sooner rather than later.

On my ’75 vintage road bike I went the whole hog and got the rear brake bridge repositioned so that I could use the original Dura Ace sidepulls with 700C wheels. Any reputable frame builder can do this fairly easily, and before a repaint would be the best time 🙂

Grrrr 8:02 pm 06 Feb 12

mp2615 said :

Thanks for all this. budget is flexible. bike is mid 80’s, frame is reynolds 531 I think. shimano 105 on the front with a 2 x 7 setup which I’m quite happy with. It just needs replacing. I’m not wanting to risk cracking it just to jam a 10 speed in.

Shimano made RSX 7-speed STI levers if you are interested in “upgrading” from down-tube shifters while keeping the rest of the components closer to original spec .. you’ll have to hunt for them though, and they won’t be cheap if you find them in good condition.

http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#bodycompat You could perhaps do the 8-cogs-of-a-9-speed-cassette thing. Spend some time reading Sheldon Brown. Think about what sort of replacement gear you want on it. Have a chat with a bike store who like “interesting” work – EG Mal Adjusted.

Pork Hunt 6:58 pm 06 Feb 12

This thread brings back happy memories of my Peugeot 10 speed racer that I bought from the sports store in Weston in the days when the Duke worked there…
Mafac centre pull brakes and the same colour yellow as the comments bar as I type this…

mp2615 6:56 pm 06 Feb 12

Thanks for all this. budget is flexible. bike is mid 80’s, frame is reynolds 531 I think. shimano 105 on the front with a 2 x 7 setup which I’m quite happy with. It just needs replacing. I’m not wanting to risk cracking it just to jam a 10 speed in. Cinelli bar and stem should polish up nicely but the front forks are chromed I think, not polished. Not sure about the rear, maybe polished to about 3/4 of their length. The brakes have adjustment, thanks for the tip, I’ll check. If I can’t source new hoods to cover the brake assembly, is it kosher to wrap the bar tape around to cover the gap ? I’ve used chromeworld before. nice work too. thanks again

Gus929 5:00 pm 06 Feb 12

I can’t remember where I found the recommendations, but 18 months ago I had my old road bike frame sandblasted by “AA Sandblasting” in Fyshwick (in the industrial area off Gladstone St, aka at the bottom of a paddock mostly full of scrap metal.) Then powder coated at Canfab Engineering.

I stripped the frames and did all the prep myself. I can’t remember the price, but I was very happy with the whole experience (bike frames are pretty tiny and simple compared to most of what these folks do.)

Hope that’s of use. 🙂

Brandi 4:11 pm 06 Feb 12

Bosworth said :

Stevens Speed Shop

http://www.facebook.com/StevensSpeedShop#!/StevensSpeedShop?sk=info

Haha thanks for the props, Boz!

Brandi 3:58 pm 06 Feb 12

Sticking with downtube shifters is an inexpensive option that keeps the bike looking period. The indexing is in the shifter itself, and you can go right up to a 10-speed rear with Dura-Ace shifters. If you’re used to riding the old girl this way, downtube shifting won’t be as much of an annoyance as it’d be to cyclists who have always ridden combined shift levers. Get a rear derailleur and cassette to match so there are no issues with shift ratio (but most 10sp Shimano kit is internally compatible)

I’m assuming the rear hub spacing is not modern 130mm … be prepared to risk cracking the frame when you widen (ie. bend) the stays. Most steels frames can cope but a couple I’ve worked with did not, resulting in cracks near be join of the chainstay and BB shell.

If the bike had 27″ wheels you’ll probably need to source long-drop brake calipers so the pads will reach the smaller-diameter rims of modern 700c wheels.

Alloy parts can be polished, not chromed. Faster and cheaper too. In fact just chuck all your steel parts and replace with period alloy – it’ll lop kilos off the bike weight 🙂

Also beware that a lot of Shimano gear called “silver” online is not polished alloy but painted, and looks s*** (to be blunt) on a vintage frame.

Any more questions? 🙂

Bosworth 3:55 pm 06 Feb 12

Stevens Speed Shop

http://www.facebook.com/StevensSpeedShop#!/StevensSpeedShop?sk=info

Friction shifting and index shifting both move the chain side-to-side on the gear sprockets.

With friction shifting, you can move the chain any distance, which sometimes means the chain is not perfectly aligned with a cog. The chain might be halfway inbetween gears.

With index shifting, the shifter has several stops, or a ratchet mechanism, which means the chain is perfectly aligned with the cog on every shift.

Grrrr 3:27 pm 06 Feb 12

How much do you want to spend on restoration? What make / model / year is your bike? It is all original currently?

Your choice of groupset will dictate the shifting..

Okwhatever 3:07 pm 06 Feb 12

http://www.chromeworld.net.au 31 Kembla Street
Fyshwick

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