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Calling all Progressives and Stoners

By jimbob87 10 November 2011 77

At lunch today, near the Merry-go-round in Civic, I happened across a petition calling for a debate on the legalisation of illicit drugs.

They seem to have gathered quite a few signatures so far, which i was assured won’t go onto some type of police database!

Anyone wanting to help lose the War on Drugs should get on down there and sign up.

What’s Your opinion?


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Calling all Progressives and Stoners
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LSWCHP 6:56 pm 08 Dec 11

fgzk said :

Above is just the effect of pedants who wish to affect us all with their ridged interpretation of knowledge. Its a wind up.

Nope, not at all. In short, if someone writes in a semi literate fashion, either here or elsewhere, I don’t pay much attention to what they have to say. It’s a useful rule that saves me wasting a lot of time.

I may be the only one here who feels that way, but I doubt it.

Jim Jones 10:34 am 08 Dec 11

fgzk said :

Above is just the effect of pedants who wish to affect us all with their ridged interpretation of knowledge. Its a wind up.

I’m assuming you mean ‘rigid’ interpretation of knowledge.

fgzk 9:09 am 08 Dec 11

Above is just the effect of pedants who wish to affect us all with their ridged interpretation of knowledge. Its a wind up.

Diggety 2:08 am 08 Dec 11

I think this thread has gone far enough.

There is no “War on Drugs” in the ACT.

If you’d like a party that respects your choice, vote LDP.

LSWCHP 10:54 pm 07 Dec 11

dpm said :

HenryBG said :

They are two entirely separate words with entirely separate meanings…

Do you mean like ‘wind’ and ‘wind’ (as in: ‘It was very windy on the long and winding road today!’)? 😉

Anyway, I don’t really give a toss, except to say that if you look on basically any grammar site or in any dictionary (not just Websters), including the Macquarie Australian (you know, the place where we live?) or the Oxford, they all say both words are interchangeable (with one country preferring one over the other – as I mentioned before; la de dah.). Check for yourself if you like. I’m not sure how long ago you went to school, but it seems the world has moved on and gotten over that issue – except you who is stuck in ye old past! Just sayin…. Hahaha! 🙂
My ‘pet peeve’ is more likely to be grammar or spelling nazis on sites like RA. A lot of people in the world have valuable points to make, but for whatever reason (English may not be their first language, they may be dyslexic, they may have dropped out of school, they may be rushed and make typos without checking, they may be young and talk in TXT speak, etc etc) they may put together ‘non-perfect posts’. But if I can understand the point they were making, I don’t care at all about the grammatical perfection of the message (OK, so ALLCAPS *is* annoying! But I did amusingly like the Firstcaps used by Krats recently!). Everyone is entitled to make their point, even those who aren’t perfect (which certainly includes me!). Tut tutting over these issues is a yawn, IMHO.
I’m probably alone on this but we should aim to discuss the points being made behind the posts, otherwise we just look we have no other argument other than pointing out typos from our ivory towers….

Bad argument there, in my view.

I equate the ability to write correct and coherent English with intelligence and education. This affects the amount of weight I apply to the views of the author. It may not be a perfect heuristic, but it works enough of the time to be worthwhile. So if I see someone writing here or elsewhere in textspeak, or ALLCAPS, or Firstcaps, or forming poorly structured sentences etc then I usually equate that with lack of intelligence, or education, or both. This makes me tend to discount the opinions of the authors. Really poorly formed posts, such as those produced by the defenders of swan molesters et al get no consideration at all, apart from a bit of mockery if I feel like it.

There are people who post on this site who write with wit and grace, and I hold their views in high regard. JB’s posts, for example, are frequently masterpieces of minimalist precision. That’s why I come here, not for the incoherent text speakers.

Then again, who cares what I think. 🙂

dpm 8:43 pm 07 Dec 11

HenryBG said :

They are two entirely separate words with entirely separate meanings…

Do you mean like ‘wind’ and ‘wind’ (as in: ‘It was very windy on the long and winding road today!’)? 😉

Anyway, I don’t really give a toss, except to say that if you look on basically any grammar site or in any dictionary (not just Websters), including the Macquarie Australian (you know, the place where we live?) or the Oxford, they all say both words are interchangeable (with one country preferring one over the other – as I mentioned before; la de dah.). Check for yourself if you like. I’m not sure how long ago you went to school, but it seems the world has moved on and gotten over that issue – except you who is stuck in ye old past! Just sayin…. Hahaha! 🙂
My ‘pet peeve’ is more likely to be grammar or spelling nazis on sites like RA. A lot of people in the world have valuable points to make, but for whatever reason (English may not be their first language, they may be dyslexic, they may have dropped out of school, they may be rushed and make typos without checking, they may be young and talk in TXT speak, etc etc) they may put together ‘non-perfect posts’. But if I can understand the point they were making, I don’t care at all about the grammatical perfection of the message (OK, so ALLCAPS *is* annoying! But I did amusingly like the Firstcaps used by Krats recently!). Everyone is entitled to make their point, even those who aren’t perfect (which certainly includes me!). Tut tutting over these issues is a yawn, IMHO.
I’m probably alone on this but we should aim to discuss the points being made behind the posts, otherwise we just look we have no other argument other than pointing out typos from our ivory towers….

HenryBG 5:24 pm 07 Dec 11

The same goes for “insure” and “ensure”.

I mean, come on! How hard is it?

HenryBG 5:22 pm 07 Dec 11

dpm said :

HenryBG said :

I’ve even had an argument about this at the library:
“Is this the ‘enquiry’ desk?”, I asked the shrivelled prune behind the counter.
“Yes”, she replies, “how can I help you?
“It’s just that your sign advertises ‘inquiries’. You will clearly need to replace it with one that is accurate”.

AFAIK, there is little difference between enquire and inquire (or their nouns) and they can generally be used interchangeably. Enquiry more commonly is used ‘to ask’ but there is no grammar rule that says that is so exclusively – and that inquiry only means ‘an investigation’. There may be preferences amongst people/groups/countries but that’s about it.
At the end of the day, it’s probably not something to get yourself too worked up about….! 🙂

They are two entirely separate words with entirely separate meanings.

Sadly, a borderline-illiterate called Webster decided to conflate their meanings when writing his substandard dictionary and for reasons of cultural chauvinism that awful dictionary is still in use.

If you have two different words to describe two different things it is completely stupid to conflate their meanings to produce both ambiguity and linguistic impoverishment. The fact that it is an ugly and ignorant americanism should make it even less desirable for taxpayers’ money being spent making up stupid signs which perpetuate foreign mis-spellings.

dpm 4:52 pm 07 Dec 11

HenryBG said :

I’ve even had an argument about this at the library:
“Is this the ‘enquiry’ desk?”, I asked the shrivelled prune behind the counter.
“Yes”, she replies, “how can I help you?
“It’s just that your sign advertises ‘inquiries’. You will clearly need to replace it with one that is accurate”.

AFAIK, there is little difference between enquire and inquire (or their nouns) and they can generally be used interchangeably. Enquiry more commonly is used ‘to ask’ but there is no grammar rule that says that is so exclusively – and that inquiry only means ‘an investigation’. There may be preferences amongst people/groups/countries but that’s about it.
At the end of the day, it’s probably not something to get yourself too worked up about….! 🙂

Deref 4:10 pm 07 Dec 11

PBO said :

fgzk said :

What’s a Verb?

A nasty hallucinegenic drug, they say that it can show you a descriptive picture of action or a state of being, so they say.

Sounds dangerous to me. Should be banned forthwith!

poetix 4:07 pm 07 Dec 11

HenryBG said :

Ben_Dover said :

AFFECT is normally a verb, and means “to influence or change.”
EFFECT is normally a noun, and means the result, consequence, or change that is made.

The horse of rampant, flagrant, and unrepentant illiteracy has well and truly bolted.

Those who paid no attention whatsoever in school and now live in houses with nary a book in sight, save the obligatory Victoria Beckham autobiography, actually believe the world deserves or needs their illiterate and insensate opinions.

I’ve even had an argument about this at the library:
“Is this the ‘enquiry’ desk?”, I asked the shrivelled prune behind the counter.
“Yes”, she replies, “how can I help you?
“It’s just that your sign advertises ‘inquiries’. You will clearly need to replace it with one that is accurate”.

And how did she answer? Perhaps she picked up on the fact that you regarded her as a dried up piece of fruit, and were approaching her to be unpleasant, and to waste her time. Perhaps she realised that ‘inquiries’ is a legitimate alternative to ‘enquiries’, (or enquiry desk, by extension) slightly more common in the USA, but nevertheless perfectly correct. Or perhaps, as an employee, that she is not responsible for the sign, and bit her lip so as not to call you anything rude? If she didn’t say anything rude, I think she deserves a medal. Behaviour like this gives the glorious cause of pedantry a bad name. And the full-stop in your last sentence should precede the quotation marks, as the whole sentence is made up of what you said.

An addiction to grammar does not preclude courtesy. Or so I’ve heard.

PBO 3:41 pm 07 Dec 11

fgzk said :

What’s a Verb?

A nasty hallucinegenic drug, they say that it can show you a descriptive picture of action or a state of being, so they say.

HenryBG 3:39 pm 07 Dec 11

Ben_Dover said :

AFFECT is normally a verb, and means “to influence or change.”
EFFECT is normally a noun, and means the result, consequence, or change that is made.

The horse of rampant, flagrant, and unrepentant illiteracy has well and truly bolted.

Those who paid no attention whatsoever in school and now live in houses with nary a book in sight, save the obligatory Victoria Beckham autobiography, actually believe the world deserves or needs their illiterate and insensate opinions.

I’ve even had an argument about this at the library:
“Is this the ‘enquiry’ desk?”, I asked the shrivelled prune behind the counter.
“Yes”, she replies, “how can I help you?
“It’s just that your sign advertises ‘inquiries’. You will clearly need to replace it with one that is accurate”.

Kat87 2:57 pm 07 Dec 11

Whoever said alcohol and tobacco use wasn’t harmless? If you apply what I stated about “drug use” (the illicit kind) to either alcohol or tobacco my response would still be the same.

Stevian 12:55 pm 05 Dec 11

Deref said :

Kat87 said :

How it effects me doesn’t really concern you. My point was that those who use drugs and advocate them don’t seem willing to take into consideration what it does to those around them. My personal experience is enough to convince me that drug use is not; and will never be, harmless.

So you’d support alcohol and tobacco prohitibion, Kat? After all, alcohol and cigarettes kill many more people than the illegal drugs.

Careful, when you expose ignorant prejudices to logical thoughts you can get an explosive reaction

poetix 12:02 pm 05 Dec 11

fgzk said :

What’s a Verb?

Something at the edge of the pavement. Easy to trip over when feeling a little ‘progressive’.

fgzk 11:25 am 05 Dec 11

What’s a Verb?

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