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Coles to be anchor tenant at new Amaroo Group Centre

By Canfan - 1 August 2014 25

Coles Property Director Greg Chubb and Deputy Chief Minister Andrew Barr are pleased to announce that a full line Coles supermarket will be the anchor tenant for the new Amaroo Group Centre.

The centre will include a 2,300 to 2,500sqm supermarket, a Liquorland, around 1100sqm of space for between five to 10 specialty retail shops, more than 30 residential apartments and parking for around 160 cars.

The construction phase will create around 200 jobs and work is expected to commence in the latter part 2015 and take approximately 15 – 18 months to complete, with the centre expected to open for business during the 2016-17 financial year.

Once opened, the development will also significantly contribute to the local employment market with around 150 ongoing jobs in Coles and Liquorland and additional employment opportunities in the centre’s specialty retail outlets.

The inclusion of medium density residential apartments as part of a new group centre development, confirms the ACT Government’s ongoing commitment to provide Canberrans with the opportunity of living closer to services and major public transport routes.

Additional medium density housing will also be constructed in the areas adjacent to the centre.

Coles Property Director Greg Chubb said that, “Amaroo is a growing suburb in Canberra with great potential. Our development will mean local residents can have a full-line supermarket for the first time in their suburb.”

He also confirmed that local architectural firm Cox and other local consultants would be used to provide concept plans and building and engineering services.

(Andrew Barr Media Release)

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Coles to be anchor tenant at new Amaroo Group Centre
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Maya123 5:40 pm 05 Aug 14

HiddenDragon said :

Some might say that things have only gotten worse in the meantime, but I think there have been small signs of hope, including some responsiveness to a greater consumer demand for Australian produce (on food safety and nationalism grounds).

And carbon ‘miles’. That’s the important one for me, along with food safety. Australian, for me, comes after those. (Of cause buying local in Australia means it is Australian! [:)])

HiddenDragon 4:24 pm 05 Aug 14

There is good reason for concern about the market power and practices of the big supermarket chains, as discussed in this Four Corners, from six years ago:

http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/content/2008/s2348906.htm

Some might say that things have only gotten worse in the meantime, but I think there have been small signs of hope, including some responsiveness to a greater consumer demand for Australian produce (on food safety and nationalism grounds).

Beyond that, it’s probably worth remembering that some people (probably increasing numbers) really don’t have much choice about their grocery shopping in terms of what they can afford – and for such folk, the relatively cheap “own brand” offerings of the major supermarket chains are essential to making ends meet each week.

Holden Caulfield 3:19 pm 05 Aug 14

“Magnate Mart?”

I’ll have two Ginas, a couple of Andrews and, yeah, throw in half a dozen Clives, too, they seem to be in season at the moment.

A shame they still don’t make ’em like those Christophers and Alans all those years ago.

Ghettosmurf87 12:22 pm 05 Aug 14

Steven Bailey said :

I’m sorry I don’t have the time to detail for you the individual policies of every political entity in Australia. Perhaps it would be eisier if you found me an example of a politician, outside of the two majors, that campaigned on a policy that supports a complete market dominance in Australia’s food industries.

You may, or may not, have seen family businesses destroyed, and farmers in tears because of the corporate depravity sanctioned by the two major parties (and that’s okay), but I have.

Steven, lets cut the emotive language and debate this with facts. I am not arguing for the duopoly. I am simply asking that when you make claims, you don’t embellish them so that it seems you have more direct support than you actually do. It doesn’t do your credibility any favours when you make broad claims which are simply not true.

I am not saying that those minor parties have policies that directly advocate FOR the duopoly. I would even argue that the 2 majors policies are not DIRECTLY for the duopoly, though the continuance of the status quo is certainly what results from their policies.

All I am saying is that I would argue that many minor parties in the Australian politicval landscape do not have a policy on this matter, one way or the other and therefore it is not reasonable for you to claim that they actually support your viewpoint.

Not opposing something doesn’t mean you support it.

Steven Bailey 3:49 pm 04 Aug 14

Ghettosmurf87 said :

Steven Bailey said :

My arguments against Coles and Woolworths is supported by countless entities throughout Australia including The Council of Small Business of Australia, every independent politician I know, and every small political party in Australia.

Well of course the Small Business Council is going to support Small Business rather than the corporate multi-nationals. That’s about as obvious as saying that the Cancer Council is against smoking or that the Mineral Council supports the mining industry.

How many independent politicians do you know then Steven? Are they all really vehemently against Coles and Woolies, or do they just think it would be nice if there were some other smaller retailers around as well?

And “Every small political party in Australia” supports your argument? Are you sure of that? Are you telling me that the Liberal Democratic Party, the Shooters and Fishers Party, the Australian First Nations Political Party, Australian Christians, Rise Up Australia, the Voluntary Euthanasia Party, Wikileaks, Carers Alliance, Australian Sports Party, Australian Motoring Enthusiasts Party, and the list goes on and on….ALL support your argument?

Whether or not the duopoly is good or bad is a debate to be had. But lets actually debate it using facts, rather than making exaggerated claims which I doubt you can substantiate.

You make some good points. I respond with respect to those points.

Your first point is a good one. Coles and Woolworths are to small business what cancer is to humans, so thanks for making that comparison.

The Australian Sex Party, the Greens, Nick Xenophon, Katter, John madigan, Andrew Wilkie, I could go on. They all campaign against the duopoly of Coles and Woolworths.

I’m sorry I don’t have the time to detail for you the individual policies of every political entity in Australia. Perhaps it would be eisier if you found me an example of a politician, outside of the two majors, that campaigned on a policy that supports a complete market dominance in Australia’s food industries.

The point is that Coles and Woolworths is a duopoly that, whilst limiting our access to healthy Australian grown food, erodes the hearts of Australian communities and small businesses. And with the support of other Australian corporations, including the two main political parties, Coles and Woolworths act with impunity and precision in their ruthless pursuit of putting profits before people.

You may, or may not, have seen family businesses destroyed, and farmers in tears because of the corporate depravity sanctioned by the two major parties (and that’s okay), but I have.

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