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Double demerit points for the long weekend

By Canfan 3 October 2014 33

Attorney-General, Simon Corbell, reminds drivers that double demerit points will be applied over the Labour Day long weekend as part of the government’s commitment to improving road safety.

Double demerit points will apply to speeding offences and increased demerit points will apply to a number of other traffic offences from Friday 3 October to Monday 6 October 2014 inclusive, and are in line with NSW arrangements over this holiday period.

“Don’t ruin your family’s or someone else’s holiday through reckless driving,” Mr Corbell said.

“Speeding, fatigue and drink-driving are the main causes of road deaths and serious crashes. Plan your trip to meet arrival times without exceeding speed limits.
“If drivers exceed the speed limit by more than 15km/h and up to 30km/h, 6 demerit points will be applied.

“Exceeding the speed limit by 45 km/h or more during this Labour Day weekend will result in 12 demerit points being applied and the risk of licence suspension.”

Drivers are also urged to observe the seatbelt rules and ensure passengers under 16 years old wear appropriate seatbelts or child restraints.

“Failure to wear seatbelts can substantially increase the incidence of fatalities and serious injuries to vehicle occupants,” Mr Corbell said.

“Six demerit points can be applied to the licence of any driver who does not wear a seatbelt or who permits passengers to travel in the vehicle unrestrained.”

Drivers who commit other offences, such as running red lights or failing to stop at stop signs, will receive one extra demerit point on top of the usual number applied.

Mr Corbell also encouraged drivers to be aware of the dangers of fatigue and to ensure they were alert on the roads this long weekend.

“A tired driver becomes a dangerous driver, therefore, I urge people travelling interstate to take advantage of the driver reviver sites in the south east region of NSW where refreshments are available or alternatively take a break at one or more of the many rest stops.”

(Simon Corbell Media Release)

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Double demerit points for the long weekend
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justin heywood 9:07 am 09 Oct 14

rommeldog56 said :

..The ” I’ll just slow the world down to my speed” on the road attitude creates traffic tains (particularly in peak hours) behind the slower vehicle so creates fustration and contributes to unnecessary lane changing, …

Are people so really so self-absorbed that they think slower drivers are deliberately trying to slow THEM down?
Wow

rommeldog56 7:08 am 09 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

house_husband said :

….It even says the following in the ACT Road Rules “Always drive at a legal speed comfortable for you, your car and your passengers, but at a speed that will not obstruct other road users.” .

I think you need to re-read what you wrote. The above does not even remotely suggest that vehicles should be driven at the maximum allowable speed.

And if you regard a vehicle travelling 10 km below the limit as an ‘obstruction’ to you… Well words fail me. I give up and goodbye

In fine conditions, I reckon going 10kph or more under the posted speedlimit in fine/clear conditions is an obstruction. If your car isnt up to it (heavy vehicles, tractors, L platers, etc excepted) or the driver isn’t, then they shouldn’t be on the road. The ” I’ll just slow the world down to my speed” on the road attitude creates traffic tains (particularly in peak hours) behind the slower vehicle so creates fustration and contributes to unnecessary lane changing, brealing, etc.

Just show a little rspect and consideration for fellow road users – who want to or need to travel at the speed limit.

house_husband 10:29 pm 08 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

And if you regard a vehicle travelling 10 km below the limit as an ‘obstruction’ to you… Well words fail me. I give up and goodbye

Words fail me that you can’t acknowledge that someone travelling below the speed limit can represent an increased risk to other road users.

Yes I would regard 10kmh below the limit as an obstruction in some circumstances as would may other drivers. Could I deal with it and not get angry? Of course. Do I think it demonstrates poor skill on behalf of the slow driver and a probable limited ability to deal with more complex situations like multi lane roundabouts and busy intersections? Absolutely.

The reality is that poorly skilled drivers with limited spatial awareness will continue to kill and maim themselves and others at speeds below the limit. The sooner that this type of behaviour is treated as seriously as drivers who travel too fast for the conditions, the sooner we might start to see fewer casualty crashes. And with that I’m done too.

justin heywood 10:00 pm 08 Oct 14

house_husband said :

….It even says the following in the ACT Road Rules “Always drive at a legal speed comfortable for you, your car and your passengers, but at a speed that will not obstruct other road users.” .

I think you need to re-read what you wrote. The above does not even remotely suggest that vehicles should be driven at the maximum allowable speed.

And if you regard a vehicle travelling 10 km below the limit as an ‘obstruction’ to you… Well words fail me. I give up and goodbye

house_husband 8:34 pm 08 Oct 14

switch said :

Works for push bikes on our roads. They even get special limits on how close you can get.

I have no problem with push bikes, trucks, tractors, P platers or any other vehicle that is unable to do things like merge at or maintain the posted speed limit. What I have a problem with is that there is an onus on every driver to not act in a way that increases the risk to other road users. If you have a full licence and almost any size car on a good road in clear conditions what possible legitimate reason is there for not merging at the correct speed or driving below the speed limit to the point you are holding up the flow of traffic?

It even says the following in the ACT Road Rules “Always drive at a legal speed comfortable for you, your car and your passengers, but at a speed that will not obstruct other road users.” And the answer that other people should be able to cope with it does not somehow magically absolve the person who is breaking the road rules in the first place.

switch 3:56 pm 08 Oct 14

house_husband said :

Also your argument that a competent driver should be able to deal with this does not take away from the fact that by creating a speed differential the merging driver has increased the risk of an accident to all concerned. Where does it stop? Should slower drivers be allowed to change lanes into faster traffic because alert drivers should be able to apply the brakes in time?

Works for push bikes on our roads. They even get special limits on how close you can get.

Grimm 11:23 am 08 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

Well you must really have difficulties then. A significant number of vehicles cannot do 100 km/h. (Buses, trucks, L platers, scooters etc.)

I would say that if a driver cannot handle adjusting their speed to allow traffic to enter, THEY have a problem and should hand their license in forthwith.

There are no autobahns or US style freeways here, and there will ALWAYS be slower traffic. We have to learn to deal with that.

If your vehicle outright can not do the posted speed limit, it is probably not roadworthy and is dangerous. It should not be on the road.

If you do have something that is unable to do the posted speed limit, and insist on being a road hazard by taking it on the road, it is up to you to safely merge into traffic.

The “I’ll be an obstruction and nuisance just because I can” banter is pretty poor, and outright selfish.

house_husband 10:13 am 08 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

I would say that if a driver cannot handle adjusting their speed to allow traffic to enter, THEY have a problem and should hand their license in forthwith.

There are no autobahns or US style freeways here, and there will ALWAYS be slower traffic. We have to learn to deal with that.

If you read the ACT road rules there is no onus on existing traffic to adjust their speed to allow for merging traffic that is travelling slower than the posted limit. The merging vehicle is expected to accelerate to near the posted speed limit and enter safely into a gap in traffic. If the merging vehicle is unable to do this then they MUST give way to traffic already on the road they are merging into. So on what basis should a driver hand in their licence when they are following the road rules?

Also your argument that a competent driver should be able to deal with this does not take away from the fact that by creating a speed differential the merging driver has increased the risk of an accident to all concerned. Where does it stop? Should slower drivers be allowed to change lanes into faster traffic because alert drivers should be able to apply the brakes in time?

tuco 8:21 am 08 Oct 14

I thought registering bikes was meant to solve all the problems on the road.
Wait – did I get that right?

JC 11:51 pm 07 Oct 14

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

So why don’t we see some road safety campaigns targeting this type of behaviour? Serious question.

It is all too hard, especially when you can take the easy way out and have speed cameras and a long list of people being caught, never mind it isn’t necessarily dangerous. Illegal of course.

JC 11:49 pm 07 Oct 14

dtc said :

Although its then incumbent on the slower driver not to speed up to 100km/h when there is an overtaking lane since you can be booked for speeding while overtaking…

Doesn’t actually apply in multilane roads or overtaking lanes. But certainly does when the overtaking vehicle crosses to the opposing lane to overtake.

Same too with overtaking on the left. Here in Aus it is legal to do this on a multilane road, and of course on a single lane road if the vehicle being overtaken is turning right.

justin heywood 10:08 pm 07 Oct 14

watto23 said :

+1 this is a problem. If the traffic is going 100 km/h you need to merge at that speed, not merge at 80km/h. That is one instance where you have to do the speed the traffic is doing.

Well you must really have difficulties then. A significant number of vehicles cannot do 100 km/h. (Buses, trucks, L platers, scooters etc.)

I would say that if a driver cannot handle adjusting their speed to allow traffic to enter, THEY have a problem and should hand their license in forthwith.

There are no autobahns or US style freeways here, and there will ALWAYS be slower traffic. We have to learn to deal with that.

dtc 10:02 pm 07 Oct 14

It does constantly amaze me that when people are asked what annoys them the most about other drivers, its ‘driving too slowly in the right hand lane’

ie not going as fast as someone else wants them to go

if this is a courtesy issue, by all means criticise how bad some drivers are at this; but as a speed issue its the same as in this thread – take a breath, put on a podcast or something and relax. Sometimes things are just that way. Think instead the road to BB is 45km longer than the straight line distance (105 vs 148km) ie 33% extra distance! And how much better it would be if Canberra was at Braidwood (or jervis bay, but thats another dream)

Although its then incumbent on the slower driver not to speed up to 100km/h when there is an overtaking lane since you can be booked for speeding while overtaking…

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