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Double demerit points for the long weekend

By Canfan - 3 October 2014 33

Attorney-General, Simon Corbell, reminds drivers that double demerit points will be applied over the Labour Day long weekend as part of the government’s commitment to improving road safety.

Double demerit points will apply to speeding offences and increased demerit points will apply to a number of other traffic offences from Friday 3 October to Monday 6 October 2014 inclusive, and are in line with NSW arrangements over this holiday period.

“Don’t ruin your family’s or someone else’s holiday through reckless driving,” Mr Corbell said.

“Speeding, fatigue and drink-driving are the main causes of road deaths and serious crashes. Plan your trip to meet arrival times without exceeding speed limits.
“If drivers exceed the speed limit by more than 15km/h and up to 30km/h, 6 demerit points will be applied.

“Exceeding the speed limit by 45 km/h or more during this Labour Day weekend will result in 12 demerit points being applied and the risk of licence suspension.”

Drivers are also urged to observe the seatbelt rules and ensure passengers under 16 years old wear appropriate seatbelts or child restraints.

“Failure to wear seatbelts can substantially increase the incidence of fatalities and serious injuries to vehicle occupants,” Mr Corbell said.

“Six demerit points can be applied to the licence of any driver who does not wear a seatbelt or who permits passengers to travel in the vehicle unrestrained.”

Drivers who commit other offences, such as running red lights or failing to stop at stop signs, will receive one extra demerit point on top of the usual number applied.

Mr Corbell also encouraged drivers to be aware of the dangers of fatigue and to ensure they were alert on the roads this long weekend.

“A tired driver becomes a dangerous driver, therefore, I urge people travelling interstate to take advantage of the driver reviver sites in the south east region of NSW where refreshments are available or alternatively take a break at one or more of the many rest stops.”

(Simon Corbell Media Release)

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33 Responses to
Double demerit points for the long weekend
justin heywood 10:12 am 07 Oct 14

house_husband said :

justin heywood said :

Unless you’re a cardiac surgeon racing to save someone’s life, accept that sometimes you will have to slow down and be tolerant of other drivers of variable skill and comfort levels.

The problem is that there are plenty of drivers out there whose “variable skill” means they are a danger to themselves and others. If you can’t perform basic functions like matching speed when merging, driving with the flow of traffic, judging overtaking distances or giving way at intersections then you shouldn’t be on the road.

When did we reach the stage that the main test of driver skill is speed related?

The main criteria for driving is surely the ability to drive safely.

If a driver is unable to deal with slower traffic in a responsible way, THEY are the unsafe driver, not the person driving 10 km below the limit.

house_husband 8:36 am 07 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

Unless you’re a cardiac surgeon racing to save someone’s life, accept that sometimes you will have to slow down and be tolerant of other drivers of variable skill and comfort levels.

The problem is that there are plenty of drivers out there whose “variable skill” means they are a danger to themselves and others. If you can’t perform basic functions like matching speed when merging, driving with the flow of traffic, judging overtaking distances or giving way at intersections then you shouldn’t be on the road.

justin heywood 5:19 pm 06 Oct 14

Southmouth said :

….. this is 2014 and people expect to be able to drive at the posted speed unless there are unusual conditions at play.

There’s your problem right there. “People expect…”, meaning YOU expect to be able to drive at the maximum speed allowable. This will often not be the case when there is a lot of traffic about.

I’m not retired, nor do I knit, but like you I have driven a lot, been in a few prangs (including a fatal) and have learned to become a lot more philosophical about other drivers; i.e. they aren’t all as good as me but I’ll live longer if I just deal with it.

Worst case scenario? I’ll be at the coast 10 minutes later. The world will still turn.

Southmouth 4:05 pm 06 Oct 14

justin heywood said :

Scary that I’m sharing the road with some of the attitudes displayed on this thread.

The scary thing is almost getting wiped out a couple of times a year by someone who can’t judge distance who is overtaking someone who is driving in a way that would irritate all but retired cardigan wearers. They other scary thing is coming across fatalities caused by same, which I do, all too often.

I agree that impatience is the root cause, but this is 2014 and people expect to be able to drive at the posted speed unless there are unusual conditions at play. I don’t believe it’s realistic to think that people are going to get any more patient over time.

There will always be the moron who will overtake you regardless of your speed but if everyone is overtaking you it’s time to surrender that license

JC 12:48 pm 06 Oct 14

Southmouth said :

I agree that there are road conditions that require a speed lower than the posted speed to be safe but this accounts for like 1percent of the occurrences and was obviously not the intent of my comment. The fact is that if you are travelling at a speed below the traffic flow, most people will overtake you and that is serious hazard. Do you do 99 km/h when using an overtaking lane?

Really? In my driving experience the road conditions vary based on a number of factors. Take the summer conga line to the coast for example, with the traffic on there some days 80km/h is about the safest speed, but you still get some who will do absolute and utter silly things endangering themselves and those around to get two cars ahead.

As for you 1% claim I assume you are talking in the city, because sure as shit it isn’t 1% in the country. Most open country roads have a speed limit of 100km/h which just is not safe, yet people see that speed and try to drive at that speed and curse anyone who dares to drive at what is a safe and sensible speed.

justin heywood 12:39 pm 06 Oct 14

Scary that I’m sharing the road with some of the attitudes displayed on this thread.

The problem is not people travelling 10 km below the limit or L platers etc. It’s impatience – stemming from an entitlement mentality (eg. that driver is not driving at what I think is the proper speed!).

Unless you’re a cardiac surgeon racing to save someone’s life, accept that sometimes you will have to slow down and be tolerant of other drivers of variable skill and comfort levels.

Too many people think that everyone should behave exactly as they do.

Southmouth 10:25 am 06 Oct 14

JC said :

Southmouth said :

and making it illegal to be more than 10km BELOW the limit would reduce fatalities for sure. (Although upset some, particularly those who think doing 90 in a 100 makes them safe drivers)

Seriously? That is the dumbest dumbest idea/statement I’ve heard in years. People need to drive to the conditions, that may well be 40km/h (or more) below the speed limit on some roads and some conditions, not some arbitrary figure.

What we do need maybe are some laws like in the UK that, in theory force people to pull over and let others pass when they are holding up traffic driving too slowly.

Though do agree that the fixation with speeding by governments and police is also a crock.

I agree that there are road conditions that require a speed lower than the posted speed to be safe but this accounts for like 1percent of the occurrences and was obviously not the intent of my comment. The fact is that if you are travelling at a speed below the traffic flow, most people will overtake you and that is serious hazard. Do you do 99 km/h when using an overtaking lane?

house_husband 8:59 am 06 Oct 14

“Speeding, fatigue and drink-driving are the main causes of road deaths and serious crashes. Plan your trip to meet arrival times without exceeding speed limits”

I would love for Mr Corbell to back this statement up with some actual hard facts. The one thing that our annual report on crashes here in the ACT is completely devoid of is causes and/or contributing factors. Or perhaps they have that information and because it doesn’t suit their revenue raising “speeding is the root of all evil” approach it gets hidden?

Until we have a genuine evidence based approached to road safety it’s all just hyperbole and hot air that will do little to have any real long term impact on reducing casualty crashes.

JC 6:26 pm 05 Oct 14

Southmouth said :

and making it illegal to be more than 10km BELOW the limit would reduce fatalities for sure. (Although upset some, particularly those who think doing 90 in a 100 makes them safe drivers)

Seriously? That is the dumbest dumbest idea/statement I’ve heard in years. People need to drive to the conditions, that may well be 40km/h (or more) below the speed limit on some roads and some conditions, not some arbitrary figure.

What we do need maybe are some laws like in the UK that, in theory force people to pull over and let others pass when they are holding up traffic driving too slowly.

Though do agree that the fixation with speeding by governments and police is also a crock.

Southmouth 1:14 pm 05 Oct 14

Twice in the last couple of months I’ come across serious accidents at the intersection of the Monaro hwy and Old Cooma rd. One was a fatality. Can anyone tell me if this is on the black spot funding list?

Southmouth 12:50 pm 05 Oct 14

I do around 75,000km a year as a combination of work and play kms. I see more than my fair share of craziness. A fair proportion is from people who are discernibly city drivers ( so act plates on the way to the coast or nsw plates with skis on the roof for eg) who are simply not used to judging distances when overtaking on country roads. I fully support double demerit holiday periods but overtaking is the big issue. I’m not sure what can be done but banning L platers on long weekends and making it illegal to be more than 10km BELOW the limit would reduce fatalities for sure. (Although upset some, particularly those who think doing 90 in a 100 makes them safe drivers)

BenjaminRose1991 10:04 pm 04 Oct 14

The government’s commitment to improving road safety should include making it harder for people not suited for safe driving to get licenses in the first place with harsher penalties for existing drivers (i.e. $1000 for tailgating a vehicle on a road with a speed limit exceeding 80 km/h + loss for 4 demerit points)

This should also include all authorised drivers of ACT government plated vehicles and ACTEW vehicles. Both of which I often see speeding, tailgating, and/or driving erratically obviously under the impression that because they are a government employee that the rules don’t apply.

gooterz 9:43 pm 03 Oct 14

Is it constitutional to change the laws for holidays?

watto23 4:21 pm 03 Oct 14

Yet most of the bad driving i see is people who are either unattentive or just don’t know the rules.
Speeding is just the easy thing to pick on and raises the most revenue.

magiccar9 1:43 pm 03 Oct 14

Double demerit points will apply to speeding offences and increased demerit points will apply to a number of other traffic offences from Friday 3 October to Monday 6 October 2014 inclusive, and are in line with NSW arrangements over this holiday period.

So we’re back to picking and choosing what penalties apply are we? If it’s double demerits, leave it at that. Don’t make some offences double and some less (but still increased).

Yet another sign that the only offence being policed is speeding…. shouldn’t say I’m surprised really.

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