Feed in Tariff details released

johnboy 11 February 2009 44

[First Filed: February 10, 2009 @ 12:45]

Simon Corbell has announced the details of “Stage 1 of the ACT’s Electricity Feed-in Tariff Scheme for households and commercial buildings”.

The start date is going to be 1 March and households that produce more electricity than they consume will be paid 50.05 cents per kilowatt.

    This is 3.88 times the calculated normal cost of electricity.”

    The amendments will be introduced into the Legislative Assembly this Thursday, and the Government is confident they will passed to allow the scheme to commence on March 1.

    The ACT Labor Government has decided to introduce the Feed-in Tariff scheme in 2 stages. Stage 1 will allow householders and commercial building owners with renewable energy generation of up to 30kw capacity to be eligible for the tariff. The average size installation for a household is around 1.5kw. At 30kw large commercial buildings such as shopping centres, office complexes and warehouses will also be eligible.

Windmills, solar panels, impellers in guttering, exercise bikes, the possibilities are endless once people are given a real financial incentive to produce and conserve.

Let’s just hope it doesn’t become economical to run a diesel generator in the shed feeding in. Or even worse to tap the neighbour’s power.

Update [Che] – Just found out that while the legislation is effective from 1 March 2009, the process then becomes that the electricity retailers (ACTEW, Energy Australia etc) will wait for the govt to develop a Code of Best Practice before they are then willing to offer customers a 20 year contract. This could take some months. So while its all supposed to happen on Sunday 1 March 2009, the reality is that it will be some months before Actew start paying out the 50.05c per kilowatt hour. I’m hoping the ACT govt doesn’t go the way of NSW and is so broke they can’t afford to pay their bills by then.


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monomania monomania 4:14 pm 14 Feb 09

che said :

I feel all warm and cozy wrapped in my smug.
My little sunny boy 1.3kw system produces about 8.5kwh per day which is around half my daily usage.

I’d just like to thank See Change Jamison for getting me into this great idea.

Well may you be smug while the rest of us pays off your little toy. This is a crazy scheme and astrojax is plainly wrong. I don’t know who estimated the 2.2 euros a month. PV installation in Germany has virtually collapsed because tariffs were reduced. Only 1.5% of German electricty is generated in this way. A critic estimated that each solar PV job in Germany had cost 330000 euros. Probably no more believable that the nonsense we here about the benefits of PV.

astrojax astrojax 2:12 pm 12 Feb 09

http://inside.org.au/solar-policy-trapped-in-the-state-shadowlands/

“The objection to a gross scheme is that it is more expensive, and the added cost will be borne by other electricity users as higher average prices are charged to all grid connected homes. This is true. But Germany’s gross feed-in tariff is estimated to have added just 2.2 euros to the average monthly cost of household power bills. At the same time, it has mobilised large amounts of private capital (the investment made by householders in installing the rooftop panels in the first place) for a public good (reducing greenhouse gas emissions) at minimal cost to government and the budget. Deploying widely dispersed, small scale rooftop generators also has other system-wide benefits: it reduces electricity wastage through transmission losses (because generation and consumption are closer together) and allows generators to delay or cancel planned investment in new large scale power plants. This last point is particularly relevant to Australia, where new installed capacity is often required to meet the peak loads that occur on hot summer afternoons as airconditioners are switched on. The output from rooftop cells peaks at the very time when additional power is most urgently needed in the grid. When the demand for power surges on hot afternoons, the spot cost of electricity in the national energy market also soars. (This provides further justification for paying a premium for the electricity generated from suburban rooftops and suggests that the subsidy under a gross feed-in tariff is lower than a comparison with average electricity prices would suggest.)”

so, re the question @27, yes indeed…

p1 p1 1:24 pm 12 Feb 09

So I wonder if the cost of dog food would be less then the money back from the scheme if you ran a pack 6 husky’s in shifts 24 hours a day on power generating tread mills?

Only if you source your dog food one ‘roo at a time. .22 rimfire is cheap…

shauno shauno 1:14 pm 12 Feb 09

So I wonder if the cost of dog food would be less then the money back from the scheme if you ran a pack 6 husky’s in shifts 24 hours a day on power generating tread mills?

che che 12:43 pm 12 Feb 09

Cost of the installed system with fed govt rebate was $5100 as part of the See Change Jamison Community Bulk buy from Armada Solar.

VYBerlinaV8_the_one_they_all_copy VYBerlinaV8_the_one_they_all_copy 11:26 am 12 Feb 09

I could afford to do this, but think it’s false economy so I won’t. PirateMonkey in post 31 should be running this scheme.

enrique enrique 11:15 am 12 Feb 09

Thanks for the info chewy.

jakez jakez 10:22 am 12 Feb 09

chewy14 said :

enrique said :

Pommy bastard said :

So, excuse my ignorance, but isn’t this just the taxpayer susbsidising the electricity bill for those who can afford to install these systems?

You know all those people that have signed on to “Green Power” at the higher rate? Well, you would assume that the extra money they pay for their power gets used to pay for the feed-in tariff.

But I would be interested to know exactly where the money comes from to pay the tariff.

Enrique,

they’ve already said that the money for the tariff will come from all users in the ACT. So everyone pays for a feelgood scheme, which only people with a lazy $10-$20K lying around will be able to afford.

Sounds like most Government programs to me.

chewy14 chewy14 10:05 am 12 Feb 09

enrique said :

Pommy bastard said :

So, excuse my ignorance, but isn’t this just the taxpayer susbsidising the electricity bill for those who can afford to install these systems?

You know all those people that have signed on to “Green Power” at the higher rate? Well, you would assume that the extra money they pay for their power gets used to pay for the feed-in tariff.

But I would be interested to know exactly where the money comes from to pay the tariff.

Enrique,

they’ve already said that the money for the tariff will come from all users in the ACT. So everyone pays for a feelgood scheme, which only people with a lazy $10-$20K lying around will be able to afford.

enrique enrique 9:37 am 12 Feb 09

che said :

I feel all warm and cozy wrapped in my smug.
My little sunny boy 1.3kw system produces about 8.5kwh per day which is around half my daily usage.

I’d just like to thank See Change Jamison for getting me into this great idea.

How much did it set you back to install it?

enrique enrique 9:35 am 12 Feb 09

Pommy bastard said :

So, excuse my ignorance, but isn’t this just the taxpayer susbsidising the electricity bill for those who can afford to install these systems?

You know all those people that have signed on to “Green Power” at the higher rate? Well, you would assume that the extra money they pay for their power gets used to pay for the feed-in tariff.

But I would be interested to know exactly where the money comes from to pay the tariff.

shauno shauno 6:12 am 12 Feb 09

Kramer said :

Time to get an exercise bike that feeds power back into the grid… I should be able to crank out a continual 150W, so a few hours training a week would probably pay off the bike in a few years.

http://www.econvergence.net/electro.htm

che che 11:19 pm 11 Feb 09

I feel all warm and cozy wrapped in my smug.
My little sunny boy 1.3kw system produces about 8.5kwh per day which is around half my daily usage.

I’d just like to thank See Change Jamison for getting me into this great idea.

Piratemonkey Piratemonkey 11:58 am 11 Feb 09

How about we forget about what sounds like an expensive, inefficient scheme to allow people rich enough to have solar installed to get all smug. Here is what the ACT should be doing:

Take the 950 bucks a huge percentage of our population will recieve soon from each and every person.

Spend it on a renewable energy plant near by. Then take whatever it earns and use that as a refund on each and every ACT’s households power bill. While we are at it give small locally owned businesses the same treatment.

The we will be doing something!

Creating heaps of jobs,
Doing something meaningful for the enviornment,
And most importantly saving people some serious cash.

haroldbeagle haroldbeagle 11:14 am 11 Feb 09

>>Answer me this – will these systems assist the grid when peak
>>power is required ie during last week when everyone had their
>>electric air conditioners on all day…?

Actually, No. Peak power demand is early morning, and (especially during the heat) late afternoon – basically when people are getting ready for work, and when they get home. Solar voltaic systems generate most power when the light angle is near perpendicular, and drops significantly as they get hot. Hence, for a typically north facing system they develop most power mid morning to just after midday (solar time). Unless the system is set up to face west, very little power would be generated when it is most needed for airconditioning.

Pommy bastard Pommy bastard 9:45 am 11 Feb 09

Paying people to convert to solar hot water would have a far greater effect on greenhouse gas emissions, apparently.

p1 p1 9:41 am 11 Feb 09

Yes.

AG Canberra AG Canberra 9:21 am 11 Feb 09

Answer me this – will these systems assist the grid when peak power is required ie during last week when everyone had their electric air conditioners on all day…?

p1 p1 9:19 am 11 Feb 09

So, excuse my ignorance, but isn’t this just the taxpayer susbsidising the electricity bill for those who can afford to install these systems?

While this is true, the other side is that it is expanding the market place by making it more attractive, at the same time increasing production at peak times (albeit negligibly) and making the power grid less focused on singular large corporations.

haroldbeagle haroldbeagle 8:58 am 11 Feb 09

Exactly P.B.

The rest of us are being asked to pay for the green posturing of those that can afford this folly.

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