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It would help if large swaths of the public didn’t want to buy drugs

By johnboy - 17 October 2013 12

poster

Breaking the chain of drug supply, and the detrimental effects that illicit drugs have on families and communities has motivated police and health experts to team up to deliver important information during the current illicit drugs campaign.

Police focus on combating illicit drugs because of the role they play as a significant crime precursor in the ACT community, says Drugs and Organised Crime Detective Sergeant Shane Scott.

Emergency Medicine Consultant at Calvary Hospital, Dr David Caldicott, said that law enforcement had an important role to play in preventing young people from being hurt by illicit drugs.

“Young adults do not deserve to be hurt or even die as a consequence of ill-informed choices. In my job, I’m often asked to deal with the results of those choices. Law enforcement, when performed sensitively and sensibly, can play an important public health role in disrupting the distribution of potentially very dangerous products, and remove some of the opportunity to make choices that might prove deadly.”

Detective Sergeant Shane Scott said what police are focusing on is breaking the chain and taking drug traffickers off the streets.

“Police target every criminal in the supply chain from manufacturers and importers to local dealers. These people live or work in our community so chances are you may know something,” Detective Sergeant Scott said.

“There are signs which people can look out for which could indicate illicit drug dealing. Drug dealers often have unexplained wealth, might carry large sums of cash, meet in suspicious locations or make secretive phone calls. They may also have a lot of visitors who appear to be acquaintance’s rather than friends.”

“Some people begin dealing drugs thinking it will be an easy way to make money but don’t consider the impact a criminal charge can have on their career and ability to travel overseas. Countries such as USA may deny entry to travelers convicted of a drug-related crime.”

If you suspect someone is dealing illicit drugs or witnessed suspicious behaviour in your neighbourhood, contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or at www.crimestoppers.com.au. Information can be provided anonymously and rewards may apply.

For more information on illicit drugs go to the ACT Policing website at www.police.act.gov.au.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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12 Responses to
It would help if large swaths of the public didn’t want to buy drugs
astrojax 1:01 pm 18 Oct 13

astrojax said :

also, case use is not grammar, merely typographical convention. and i have been unconventional on this forum for some years now, so it should be no surprise…

as shirty notes 🙂

astrojax 12:48 pm 18 Oct 13

buzz819 said :

astrojax said :

help us stop a drug dealer call crimestoppers

help us stop a drug dealer. call crimestoppers.

grammar.

and i did think it was ‘swathes’ [with the ‘e’] but without the ‘e’ seems to also be fine. well done.

but really, decriminalising and state control of supply might be a better way to minimise harm from the ingestion of drugs, no?

also, less burden on health system (save $$), less use of judicial (police, court, gaol/community services) resources (save $$) and revenue from government controlled sale of merchandise (make $$). makes it a win by my books…

You have a go at grammar, when;

a. You don’t use capital letters; and
b. You started a sentence with “and”.

If you want perfection, then you yourself should strive to be perfect.

i wasn’t ‘having a go at grammar’, but making the point more eloquently made by mess.

and the problem, grammatically, with starting [and here ending] a sentence with and?

also, case use is not grammar, merely typographical convention. and i have been unconventional on this forum for some years now, so it should be no surprise…

shirty_bear 12:36 pm 18 Oct 13

buzz819 said :

astrojax said :

help us stop a drug dealer call crimestoppers

help us stop a drug dealer. call crimestoppers.

grammar.

and i did think it was ‘swathes’ [with the ‘e’] but without the ‘e’ seems to also be fine. well done.

but really, decriminalising and state control of supply might be a better way to minimise harm from the ingestion of drugs, no?

also, less burden on health system (save $$), less use of judicial (police, court, gaol/community services) resources (save $$) and revenue from government controlled sale of merchandise (make $$). makes it a win by my books…

You have a go at grammar, when;

a. You don’t use capital letters; and
b. You started a sentence with “and”.

If you want perfection, then you yourself should strive to be perfect.

I’m as big a fan of pedantry as the next bloke, but I would call astrojax’ style appropriate to the forum on which it was posted.
A PR blurb should meet higher standards.

HiddenDragon 10:47 am 18 Oct 13

So Nancy Reagan was correct – just say no (to shiftworkers):

http://the-riotact.com/act-policing-declares-war-on-shift-workers/115078

curlylocks 10:07 pm 17 Oct 13

Have called them a few times for the drug dealers that use to live up the street. They basically wanted me to do their job for them take down number plates etc.
What a crock!

BimboGeek 7:27 pm 17 Oct 13

I can name a few dodgy people but I’m pretty sure the police already know them. So any calling crimestoppers I could do would simply be “being a busybody.” What is the point of that?

Tooks 6:59 pm 17 Oct 13

MarkG said :

The war on drugs makes criminals rich causes far more social and financial harm than drugs themselves ever could.

See for eg: http://www.economist.com/node/13237193

All the best to ACT police, but public co-operation with these kinds of efforts is apparently fairly underwhelming these days. Forty years and a trillion dollars in, the moral and practical failures of the global anti-drug war may just be a bit too obvious.

Couldn’t agree more.

buzz819 4:46 pm 17 Oct 13

astrojax said :

help us stop a drug dealer call crimestoppers

help us stop a drug dealer. call crimestoppers.

grammar.

and i did think it was ‘swathes’ [with the ‘e’] but without the ‘e’ seems to also be fine. well done.

but really, decriminalising and state control of supply might be a better way to minimise harm from the ingestion of drugs, no?

also, less burden on health system (save $$), less use of judicial (police, court, gaol/community services) resources (save $$) and revenue from government controlled sale of merchandise (make $$). makes it a win by my books…

You have a go at grammar, when;

a. You don’t use capital letters; and
b. You started a sentence with “and”.

If you want perfection, then you yourself should strive to be perfect.

mossrocket 3:01 pm 17 Oct 13

Mess said :

I didn’t realise Crime stoppers had such a problem with drug dealers calling them.

+1

Mess 2:29 pm 17 Oct 13

I didn’t realise Crime stoppers had such a problem with drug dealers calling them.

astrojax 2:10 pm 17 Oct 13

help us stop a drug dealer call crimestoppers

help us stop a drug dealer. call crimestoppers.

grammar.

and i did think it was ‘swathes’ [with the ‘e’] but without the ‘e’ seems to also be fine. well done.

but really, decriminalising and state control of supply might be a better way to minimise harm from the ingestion of drugs, no?

also, less burden on health system (save $$), less use of judicial (police, court, gaol/community services) resources (save $$) and revenue from government controlled sale of merchandise (make $$). makes it a win by my books…

MarkG 1:29 pm 17 Oct 13

The war on drugs makes criminals rich causes far more social and financial harm than drugs themselves ever could.

See for eg: http://www.economist.com/node/13237193

All the best to ACT police, but public co-operation with these kinds of efforts is apparently fairly underwhelming these days. Forty years and a trillion dollars in, the moral and practical failures of the global anti-drug war may just be a bit too obvious.

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